Functional Food Center

FFC Header

22nd International Conference of FFC - 10th International Symposium of ASFFBC

Functional Foods and Chronic Diseases: Science and Practice
September 22-23, 2017, at Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA

Register Now


Functional Food Center is pleased to announce its 22nd International Conference "Functional and Medical Foods for Chronic Diseases: Bioactive Compounds and Biomarkers". The conference will be held in Joseph B. Martin Conference Center at Harvard Medical School Boston, USA on September 22-23, 2017. This conference will bring together experts in medicine, biology, and the food industry to discuss the functional foods with bioactive compounds as dietary interventions for chronic diseases. Conference organized by FFC and Nutrition/Metabolism Laboratory at Department of Surgery, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center.

Main Conference Topics/Sessions

Session Topics:

  • Functional Food Definition and the Status of Functional Foods in Japan, US and other Countries
  • Functional Foods and Obesity
  • Functional Foods and Diabetes
  • Functional Foods and Neurological Diseases
  • Functional Foods and Cardiovascular Diseases (CVD)
  • Functional Foods and Cancer
  • Functional Foods with Bioactive Compound(s): Prevention and Management of Non-communicable Diseases
  • Safety of the Bioactive Compounds and Functional Foods
  • Biomarkers and Functional Food
  • Special Session: Functional Food, Microbiome and Cancer
  • Special Session: Dietary Exosomes and their Cargos
  • Special session: Engineering bioaccessibility and bioavailability of bioactive compounds
  • Current Research and Development of New Functional Food Products

For more details about the Sessions and main conference topics please visit conference Topics and Sessions page.

Call for Abstracts:

Deadline for abstract submission has been extended until July 31st, 2017, 5:pm (PST). The entire abstract should have a maximum of 1,000 words, up to three pages (including references). There is no up-front fee for submitting a conference abstract. Once the abstract is generally accepted for the conference, the corresponding/first author is responsible to pay the abstract publication fee of $49 within 10 days. Failure to pay the abstract publication fee within 10 days after abstract acceptance day will result in a late abstract publication fee of $99. First authors are expected to register, pay the conference and abstract fee, and present the paper (if submission is accepted). In the case of an emergency and the author(s) are unable to attend the conference, they are required to pay an abstract publication fee of $99. Decisions on selection will be promptly communicated to the authors via e-mail. All contributions will be reviewed, and accepted abstracts will be published in the conference proceedings book. Please email your abstract as an attachment to ffc@functionalfoodcenter.com. Please review our sample abstract.

There is no charge for the withdrawal of an abstract before May 31, 2017. In the case that the first author cannot attend the conference and present, he or she must contact the conference organizing committee via e-mail at ffc@functionalfoodcenter.com, to provide notification of withdrawal or to request a substitute presenter. Withdrawals must be received before May 31, 2017.

Please note: Abstracts withdrawn after May 31, 2016, will be published and the first author will be expected to pay the abstract publication fee. The conference does not provide financial support nor registration fee waivers for any presentations.

To avoid the last-minute rush, submit your abstract in advance. Abstracts received by the Conference Organizing Committee after July 31, 2017 at 5 pm will not be accepted. For any information concerning publications please contact us at ffc@functionalfoodcenter.com. For more information about abstract submission, click here.


Instructions for Poster Presenters:

Poster presentations allow the audience to get a clear visual of the presenters' work in a simple format. The reasonable size for posters is 2.5 - 3.0 feet high by 3.5 - 4 feet wide.

Poster Presentation Recommendations:

The poster should clearly present the title, the author(s), affiliation(s), and a description of the research, along with highlighting the abstract's major elements.Remember that pictures, tables, and figures are key to any poster display. At least 50% of the surface area should be used for photos, graphs, or diagrams. Good use of color and the use of black or dark blue for text. Too much color can be hard to read! One or two large high-quality photographs attract attention. Make the title large and clear! Include author(s) name(s) and address(es). Your poster title should be easily readable from 3 - 4 meters away. We recommend the following sections on the poster: Abstract, Introduction, Methods, Tables, Figures, Results, and Conclusions. For more information about poster sessions, please click here.

Registration Fees:

The registration fee will cover the Conference Proceedings book (Abstract book) and lunches and refreshments for two days. It will also cover a 12 month membership to the Academic Society for Functional Foods and Bioactive Compounds. Each registration allows the registrant to present up to 3 accepted abstracts maximum. Registration includes access to the entire program and Expo, meals, presentation materials and networking with expert speakers and organizing committee members.

Cancellation Policy: Before February 22, 2017: 75% refund; before May 30, 2017: 50% refund; after May 30, 2016: No refund. Reimbursements will be sent after the conference. Notice of cancellation of registration must be received in writing to the Conference Secretariat, at: ffc@functionalfoodcenter.com. All refunds will be provided after the conference within 14 days.

You may click here to make a payment for the conference registration fee.

Conference registration fees are in USD (Early Bird Registration by March 30, 2017)

  Early Bird Registration
(until March 30, 2017)
Discounted Rate
(until July 31, 2017)
Standard Rate
Full-Time Students* 295.00 345.00 N/A
Dietitians and Retired Professionals* 345.00 445.00 N/A
USDA, NIH, FDA 445.00 495.00 N/A
Academic 545.00 645.00 N/A
Commercial (Food and Medical Industry) 645.00 745.00 N/A
Exhibitor/Vendor 845.00 1045.00 N/A
Abstract Publication Fee 49.00 49.00 N/A
Explore Boston and Networking N/A 55.00 N/A

*Must present ID

Please note: space at this conference is limited and will be allocated on a first come, first served basis.

Students enrolled in an undergraduate program (MS, PhD or MD) are eligible for the Student Discount rate. When you register for the conference, you must enter your mentor's name and Email address during checkout to verify your student status.

Paper Submission:

Deadline for abstract submission has been extended until July 31st, 2017, 5:pm (PST). Full-text papers for oral presentations or posters should be submitted before July 31st, 2017. Power Points for oral presentations should be submitted before September 12, 2017. Please send all documents to ffc@functionalfoodcenter.com.

Please note that the program and sessions are subject to change.

Disclaimer: Functional Food Center, Inc, is not affiliated with Harvard University, nor is Functional Food Center, Inc, a Harvard University program or activity.

For more information about the conference, please contact us by e-mail at ffc@functionalfoodcenter.com. For international calls, please use: 469-441-8272, Toll free: 1-866-202-0487


Sample Abstract 1 (Research)

Diacylglycerol for obesity: serotonin hypothesis

Hidekatsu Yanai1, Hiroshi Yoshida2, 3, Yuji Hirowatari4, and Norio Tada3

1Department of Internal Medicine, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Kohnodai Hospital, Chiba, 21567-0345, Japan; 2Department of Laboratory Medicine, Jikei University School of Medicine, Chiba, 31567-0345, Japan; 3Internal Medicine of Metabolism and Nutrition, Jikei University Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba, 41567-0345, Japan; 4Bioscience Division, TOSOH Corp, Kanagawa, 51567-0345, Japan

Corresponding Author: Hidekatsu Yanai, PhD, Department of Internal Medicine, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Kohnodai Hospital, Chiba, 21567-0345, Japan

Keywords: diacylglycerol, intestine, obesity, serotonin, thermogenesis

Background: Diacylglycerol (DAG) oil is a natural component of various edible oils. DAG has been reported to prevent obesity through a variety of potential mechanisms in comparison with triacylglycerol (TAG) in humans. An increase in postprandial energy expenditure (EE) is proposed to be one of the mechanisms underlying this effect of DAG. Up-regulated mRNA expressions associated with EE by DAG in the small intestine may explain increased postprandial EE. The small intestine seems to contribute to changes in EE by DAG. We previously studied plasma serotonin, which is mostly present in the small intestine and mediates sympathetic thermogenesis. We found that DAG ingestion increases plasma serotonin levels by approximately 50% compared to TAG ingestion.

Objective: To understand the molecular mechanisms for DAG-induced increase in serotonin and EE, we investigated effects of DAG on serotonin release and expressions of genes associated with EE, using the human intestinal cell line.

Methods: The intestinal cell line, the Caco-2 cells, was incubated with medium containing 1-monoacylglycerol (1-monooleyglycerol [1-MOG]) and 2-monoacylglycerol (2-monooleylglycerol [2-MOG]), distinctive digestive products of DAG and TAG, respectively. We measured serotonin release from the Caco-2 cells using a newly developed high-performance liquid chromatography. Further, we studied effects of 1-MOG, 2-MOG, and serotonin on expressions of mRNA associated with EE (acyl-CoA oxidase [ACO], medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase [MCAD], fatty acid translocase [FAT], and uncoupling protein-2 [UCP-2]), by the Real-Time quantitative RT-PCR system.

Results: 100 mM 1-MOG significantly increased serotonin release from the Caco-2 cells compared with the same concentration of 2-MOG by approximately 37% (P<0.001). Expressions of mRNA of ACO, FAT, and UCP-2 were significantly higher in 100 mM 1-MOG-treated Caco-2 cells than 100 mM 2-MOG-treaed cells by approximately 13%, 24%, and 35%, respectively. Expressions of mRNA of ACO, MCAD, FAT, and UCP-2 were significantly increased in 400 nM serotonin-treated Caco-2 cells as compared with the Caco-2 cells incubated without serotonin by approximately 29%, 30%, and 39%, respectively.

Conclusion: Our study demonstrated that a hydrolytic product of DAG increases serotonin release from the intestinal cells and enhances expressions of genes associated with b-oxidation (ACO, MCAD), thermogenesis (UCP-2) and fatty acids metabolism (FAT). Furthermore, this study revealed that serotonin also enhances expression of these genes, proposing a new molecular biological mechanism for DAG-mediated anti-obesity effect. Serotonin may play an important role in DAG-mediated prevention of obesity.

(Please note: the portion below is required for our records, but will not appear in the published abstract)

FFC's 22nd International Conference

Corresponding Author: Hidekatsu Yanai, PhD, Professor, Department of Internal Medicine, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Kohnodai Hospital, Chiba, 01567-0345, Japan, e-mail: hy@gmal.com, phone number: (001) 469-441-8272, secondary phone: (866) 464-6955

Main Presenting Author: Hidekatsu Yanai, PhD, Professor, Department of Internal Medicine, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Kohnodai Hospital, Chiba, 01567-0345, Japan, e-mail: hy@gmal.com, phone number: (001) 469-441-8272, secondary phone: (866) 464-6955

Co-authors:

Hiroshi Yoshida, MD, PhD, e-mail: hyoshida@gmal.com

Yuji Hirowatari, PhD, e-mail: yhir@gmal.com

Norio Tada, MS, e-mail: mtada@gmal.com

Presentation Type (please choose one): Oral or poster

Session (please choose one): Choose one from the conference website


Sample Abstract 2 (Review)

Definition for functional food by FFC: Creating functional food products using new definition

April Mitchell and Danik Martirosyan

Functional Food Center/Functional Food Institute, Dallas, TX, 75252, USA

Corresponding Author: Danik M. Martirosyan, Functional Food Center/Functional Food Institute, Dallas, TX, 75252, USA

Keywords: Functional food definitions, bioactive compounds, biomarkers

ABSTRACT

Healthcare costs in industrialized countries are soaring as a result of rising average life expectancies and epidemics of specific chronic diseases. As the public pursues ways to become healthier and improve quality of life, functional food science has become an intriguing field of research and topic of debate to combat certain chronic diseases cost-effectively. While steps are being taken to develop and research functional food consistently across the globe, there is still not a shared international or conclusive definition of functional food. The term “functional food” was first coined in Japan in the 1980’s and the science expanded to EU and the United States quickly. However, the term “functional food” has since been the center of confusion in scientific and consumer discussions due to shifting definitions. Inconsistent definitions in the literature and government legislation have posed challenges for the development of functional food science and have caused public doubt in the effectiveness of functional food as a potential strategy for chronic diseases.

Here, the Functional Food Center’s new definition for “functional foods” was revised to: “Natural or processed foods that contains known or unknown biologically- active compounds; which, in defined, effective non-toxic amounts, provide a clinically proven and documented health benefit for the prevention, management, or treatment of chronic disease” [1,2]. In this latest version of our definition, we added the phrase “in effective non-toxic amounts” to highlight the significance of bioactive compound dosage in the consumption of functional food. This new definition of functional food by the Functional Food Center can improve communication and collaboration between the scientific, medical communities, food industry, and the public to legitimize functional food science globally.

References:

Danik M. Martirosyan and Jaishree Singh, A new definition of functional food by FFC: what makes a new definition unique? Functional Foods in Health and Disease 2015; 5(6):209-223

Danik M. Martirosyan and Jaishree Singh, Introduction to Functional Food Science, Third Edition, Editied by Martirosyan DM, Dallas: Food Science Publisher; 2015:10-24

(Please note: the portion below is required for our records, but will not appear in the published abstract)

FFC's 22nd International Conference

Corresponding Author: Danik Martirosyan, PhD, Research and Development Department, Functional Food Institute, Dallas, TX, 75024, Plano (Dallas), USA, e-mail: ffc_usa@sbcglobal.net, phone number: (001) 469-441-8272, secondary phone: (866) 202-0487

Main Presenting Author: Danik Martirosyan, PhD, Research and Development Department, Functional Food Institute, Dallas, TX, 75024, Plano (Dallas), USA, e-mail: ffc_usa@sbcglobal.net, phone number: (001) 469-441-8272, secondary phone: (866) 202-0487

Co-authors:

April Mitchell, BSc, e-mail: ffc@functionalfoodcenter.com

Presentation Type (please choose one): Oral or poster: oral

Session (please choose one): Choose one from the conference website: Session: Functional Food Definition and the Status of Functional Foods in Japan, USA and other Countries


Abstract Submission

Deadline for abstract submission has been extended until July 31st, 2017, 5:pm (PST). The entire abstract should have a maximum of 1000 words. Please use Times New Roman Font 12 for the entire abstract.

The first author of the research is considered the primary author and must present. One person may be the primary author for a maximum of 2 abstracts. However, only one abstract may be presented as an oral presentation with the other presented as a poster, or both abstracts may be presented as posters.

1. All abstract submissions must include research-based data to allow for a thorough review.

2. Abstracts must contain the following:

  • Title
  • Author(s) – do not include degree acronyms (i.e., BS, MS, PhD, etc.)
  • Primary Institution/Laboratory Name, City, State, and Country
  • Body of the abstract

3. The body of abstract should contain the following sections:

  • Keywords
  • Background
  • Methods
  • Results
  • Conclusions

4. Abstracts cannot contain the following:

  • Brand names
  • Advertisements. Research abstracts should be free from solicitations and should not contain demonstrations of products for the purpose of sales. Exhibitor’s tables are available for the purpose of advertisement and sales

5. Abstracts can contain either one picture, one graph, or one table (no combinations)

  • A graph or table must be embedded into the abstract and cannot exceed 1/3 of the page
  • Any graph or table must pertain to the abstract for the purpose of visualizing data and must be referred to in the text of the abstract
  • Pictures, tables and graphs should be no bigger than 4 1/2 in. (W) x 4 1/2 in. (L)
  • Keep in mind that all images will be displayed in black and white

6. Please also provide the following information:

  • Corresponding author(s)
  • Primary/Presenting author's name
  • Primary author's professional mailing address, e-mail address, and phone number
  • Desired presentation format (oral, poster, etc.)
  • Session name
  • Co-authors' e-mail addresses

Please note: the portion of abstract is required for our records, but will not appear in the published abstract and accordingly will not included in worrd count. Please send your abstract to the ffc@functionalfoodcenter.com via the attached file.

Also note: article submission to the Journal of Functional Foods in Health and Disease is mandatory for the oral presenters.

Click here for the sample abstract.


Accepted Abstracts

  1. Garlic essential oil provides lead discharging effect on human body, an efficacy and mechanism study. Feng B, Hui RJ, Tu YF, Wang HF, Xuan JG
  2. Impact of daily consumption of wheat germ on human health: a randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover trial. Moreira-Rosário A, Pinheiro H, Marques C, Norberto S, Sintra D, Teixeira JA, Calhau C, Azevedo LF
  3. Sustained safety and efficacy of a novel KD120 MEC multi-enzyme complex (N-Sorb®) in human volunteers. Downs BW, Kushner S, Bagchi M, Swaroop A, Bagchi D
  4. Potential implications for dietary HDAC inhibitors in the heart. Ferguson B, Bender A, Evans L
  5. Clinical evaluation of a standardized Prunus Domestica Extract on benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) in male volunteers. Sankhwar SN, Verma N, Patel N, Swaroop A, Kumar P, Bagchi M, Preuss HG, Bagchi D
  6. Blood pressure regulation: evidence for interplay between common dietary sugars and table salt. Preuss HG, Bagchi D, Swaroop A
  7. Effect of vitamin C supplementation on oxidant and antioxidant status in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Mirmiranpour H, Salehi SS, Nakhjavani M, Esteghamati A, Larry M, Hashemi P, Salehi SS
  8. Effect of cranberry extract on hepatic and intestinal cytochromes P450 in normal and obese mice – in vivo study. Ulrichova J, Liskova B, Anzenbacher P, Tomankova V, Jourova L, Bousova I, Skalova L, Matouskova P, Martin J, Anzenbacherova E
  9. Safety and free testosterone boosting efficacy of a novel Curculigo orchioides extract in male rats. Bagchi M, Chopra K, Dharavath RN, Swaroop A, Kumar P, Preuss HG, Bagchi D,
  10. Water infused with molecular hydrogen increases skin NADH. Perricone NV, Pugliese PT
  11. Effects of Jerusalem artichoke snack bar on gastric emptying on colon transit: a randomized crossover trial. Ornthanalai N, Gonlachanvit S, Chaiseri S, Chaiwatanarat T, Shiratori S, Sirisansaneeyakul S, Horkaew P, Kanungsukkasem V
  12. Analysis of the absorption of drugs in hydrogels for treatments of skin cancer using nanotechnology. Rangel-Vazquez N, Villanueva-Garcia DN
  13. Activity of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) based diet against alloxan - induced diabetes in rats. Ajayi OB, Ajayi OO, Oyerinde AS
  14. Metadichol ® a novel VDR inverse agonist and control of hypertension in patients with metabolic syndrome. Raghavan PR
  15. Randomized controlled trial of food elimination for treatment of primary headache in children. Taheri , Cader I, Seabrook J, Mazza E, De Vries M, Campbell C
  16. Ribes nigrum L. (Grossulariaceae) and Sambus nigra L. (Adoxaceae) extracts enhance growth and inhibit apoptosis in rat L6 cells. Wicks S, Mahady G, Patel S, Lawal TO, Salamon I, Raut N
  17. Charnolosome-antioxidant interaction in health and disease. Sharma S
  18. Lysophosphatidic acid promotes the tube formation of human dermal lymphatic endothelial cells in an MMP-activity-dependent manner. Sato T
  19. Hydrogen: an emerging medical gas with clinical significance. LeBaron TW
  20. Is the biological system of the elements a scientific and practical tool for functional food therapy on chronic diseases? – Lithium accumulating food being given to patients of bipolar disorders might represent a beneficial relationship for curing a chronic neurological disease. Markert B, Wuenschmann S, Fraenzle S
  21. Mitigating the symptoms of chronic diseases through the administration of probiotics. Hall S
  22. Physicochemical engineering of macronutrient digestibility and control of bioactive release in the human gastrointestinal tract. Lesmes U
  23. Understanding the use of bioactive compound for the reduction of inflammation and oxidative stress using nutrigenomics. Nambiar U
  24. Aloin prevents osteoclastogenesis via downregulation of microRNA-21. Madhyastha R
  25. Cognitive enhancing effects of aqueous extract of two medicinal plants (Tetrapleura tetraptera and Quassia undulata) in scopolamine. Koledoye O
  26. Designing biopolymer microgels for encapsulation, protection, and release of bioactives. David Julian McClements DJ, and Zhang Z
  27. The fermentation with lactic acid bacteria further enhances the immunomodulatory and antioxidant properties of a Carica Papaya Linn formulation in comparison with yeast fermentation. Caliceti C, Fortini F, Aquila G, Pagnotta E, Ugolini L, Simoni P, Calabria D, Roda A, and Rizzo P
  28. Red raspberry consumption suppresses NLRP3 inflammasome and attenuates metabolic syndromes in diet-induced obese mice. Zhu MJ, Kang Y, Xue Y, Liang X, and Du M
  29. Messenger RNAs in bovine milk exosomes are translated into bovine proteins in non-bovine systems (subject to change). Di Wu
  30. Putative roles of adipocyte-derived exosomes in colon cancer risk (subject to change). Upadhyaya B
  31. Real time in vivo monitoring of green tea polyphenol (−)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate’s effect in resolving neutrophil-mediated inflammation in transgenic zebrafish. Nguyen TL, and Mohan C
  32. DNA methyltransferase 1-targeting microRNA-148a of dairy milk: a potential bioactive modifier of the human epigenome. Melnik B
  33. Functional characterization of specific immune response and comparison of oral and intestinal human microbiota in patients with colorectal cancer after treatment with probiotic / prebiotic. Amedei A
  34. Lentinula edodes and Pleurotus ostreatus: functional food with antioxidant -antimicrobial activity and an important source of Vitamin D and medicinal compounds. Parola S
  35. New approaches to changing healthy life expectations: functional food in Turkey. Sezgin D
  36. Association between metabolic syndrome and polyunsaturated fatty acids in elderly. Schwanke C
  37. Functional properties of red-aroeira or pink pepper (Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi). Gottlieb M
  38. Encapsulation of vitamin D 3 in emulsion-based delivery systems using microfibrillated cellulose extracted from mangosteen rind. Winuprasith T
  39. Effects of fermentation on the nutritional and anti-nutritional components of cooked/boiled water melon (Citrullus Lanatus) seed. Makinde O
  40. Processing as a tool to modify natural and create process-induced barriers in plant-based foods with the aim of tailoring food digestion. Grauwet T
  41. Anti-inflammatory activity of peptide fractions obtained from casein hydrolysate generated by cell envelope proteinase PrtS purified from S. thermophilus LMD-9-ΔsrtA strain. Hafeez Z
  42. Aqueous extract of crataegus monogyna with aerobic training improves angiogenic mediators. Dehghan F, Daloii AA, Soori R, Azarbayjani MA
  43. Evaluation of the hazelnuts as functional food: molecular effects of long term maceration raw kernel extract in HepG2 human hepatocarcinoma cell line. Santi C, Benassi B, Diretto G, De Murtas O, Pacchierotti F, and Bachetta L
  44. Insight into the biochemical link between biodiversity and nutraceuticals: a case study of Carica papaya. Vora J, Pednekar S
  45. Bio-fortification of Brassica micro-greens: towards development of a nutritionally enhanced micro-green melange for non-communicable disease prevention. Loedolff B
  46. Kefir effect on metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance and obesity in adults and elderly: A systematic review. Schwanke C
  47. Effect of YH0618 soup on chemotherapy-induced toxicity in cancer patients: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial. Chen J
  48. Beneficial effect of original powdered fermented papaya preparation (fpp-ori) vs gel form and xylitol in modulating oral metabolome , inflammatory molecules and amino-acid network. A weapon for degerenrative disease? Marotta F
  49. Bioaccessibility of polyphenols – limitations and opportunities. Shpigelman A
  50. The effect of fermented buckwheat on producing L-carnitine and Gamma-aminobutyric acid enriched designer eggs. Kim D
  51. Multiplicity and selectivity in biomedical research: a view of a statistician. Kipnis V
  52. Bioactive compounds from walnut (Juglans regia L.) septum extracts: antioxidant and cytotoxic activity. Rusu M
  53. MicroRNAs in chicken egg exosomes: content and bioavailability in healthy humans. Fratantonio D
  54. The communication of animal and bacterial kingdoms through exosomes and their RNA cargos in bovine milk. Zempleni J
  55. Spent coffee grounds activate intestinal motility and are safe upon chronic treatment. Radiographic and histological study in rats. Iriondo-DeHond A
  56. Lipid biomarkers for validation of spent coffee grounds as a healthy dietary fiber. del Castillo M
  57. Decreased levels of putative heart protective metabolites in heart tissues of rats fed a vitamin B6 deficient diet: a metabolomics approach. Kumrungsee T
  58. Effect of moringa and maize flour blending ratio on the functional, nutritional and sensory quality of wheat based biscuit. Birhanu E
  59. What’s in your dietary fiber supplement? An updated look at the dietary supplement label database (DSLD) for determining total dietary fiber consumption in community oncology health care practices. Emenaker N
  60. Synergistic application of tea extract and lactic acid bacterial fermentation in enhancing bioavailability and anti-oxidative effectiveness of tea flavonoids in vitro and in vivo. Zhao D
  61. Insights into bioavailability and microbial catabolism of grape polyphenols in mice using an efficient UPLC-Triple quadrupole-MS/MS method. Zhao D
  62. Effects of gut microbiota modulation on performance of professional athletes. Angle E
  63. Challenging of finding a new type of calmodulin inhibitors. Kumrungsee T
  64. Characterization of a new functional extracellular vesicle subset in commercial dairy cow milk with protein and small RNA profiles different from canonical milk exosomes. Benmoussa M
  65. Instant pectin from sea grass Phyllospadix iwatensis as a key ingredient of the functional food with radioisotope-removing properties. Khotimchenko M
  66. Polysaccharides from two medicinal mushrooms Ganoderma lucidum and Poria cocos reveal prebiotic effects in mice. Hsiao W
  67. How much weight loss is expected after each type of bariatric surgery procedure?. Mobarki H
  68. In adults’ athletics and what is the time, energy, and macronutrient requirement to gain lean body mass?. Alhindi A
  69. Beneficial effect on original powdered fermented papaya preparation (FPP-ORI) vs gel form and xylitol in modulating oral metabolome, inflammatory molecules and amino-acid network. A weapon for degenerative disease? Marotta F
  70. Processed food addiction: evidence for a role in the obesity epidemic. Ifland J
  71. Aegeline vs statin in the treatment of Hypercholesterolemia: A comprehensive study in rat model of liver steatosis. Singh A
  72. Production of innovative Cistus Creticus leaf-flavored extra virgin olive oil based products of industrial interest with functional activity. Charalampia D, Dimitrios K, Makoudis, Panagioti, Charalampos K
  73. Correlation of specific functional foods consumption with anthropometric characteristics and body composition on a sample of 18-65 years old aged adults from Greece. Charalampia D, Ioannis D, Vaia D, Nikolaos R, Koutelidakis A
  74. Chemical compositions and bioactivities of essential oils from eleven Curcuma species. Zhang L, Zhou R, Zheng X and Du Z
  75. The role of probiotics in microbial resistance treatment and why they should be added to the World Health Organization’s List of Essential Medicines. Bentley R, Brown LT, Garcia E, Dregansky G
  76. Intake of antioxidant dietary fiber from spent coffee grounds improves the circadian rhythm and body weight management in human adults. del Castillo
  77. Composition of recombinant Lactococcus bacteria ameliorate the symptoms of EAE - multiple sclerosis animal model, in rats. Szczepankowska A

Guidelines for Full Paper Submission:

Participants with accepted abstracts may write full articles:

  1. The entire text of the full papers must be in Times New Roman, 12 point size font.
  2. Full paper margins should be 0.75 inches from the top and bottom, and 1.0 inch from the left and right for A4 format paper.
  3. Line spacing should be 1.15 and alignment justified.
  4. The submitted full papers should contain 6-16 pages. A shorter or longer manuscript must be discussed with the organizing committee.
  5. When submitting a full paper, the corresponding author should send a cover letter indicating that the authors have not submitted a similar manuscript for publication elsewhere. Full papers submitted without cover letters will not be published.
  6. The full papers and cover letter should be submitted as separate attachments to the following email address: ffc_usa@sbcglobal.net.
  7. Submit the full paper within 2 months following the date in the abstract acceptance letter, but no later than the date mentioned on the conference website.
  8. Full papers will be published in FFC’s Journal of Functional Foods in Health and Disease. Please download and use the suggested samples for an original scientific paper, review paper, and cover letter.
  9. As a token of our appreciation for article submissions in the Special Issue, we are offering 50% discount of our standard publication fee. The final cost will be $348.00. If sufficient scientific funds are unavailable for coverage of the discounted publication fee, ASFFBC is willing to accommodate as needed. Please contact us (in advance) for more details, if necessary. Don't miss your chance to be a part of this!
  10. Full-text papers should be submitted before July 30, 2017 and it is mandatory for oral presenters.

Conference Awards

The conference will have the following awards, which will be announced and presented during the conference closing session.

  • Best Oral and Poster Presentation Awards
  • Best Full Paper Award
  • Best Special Session Organizer Award
  • Best Oral and Poster Presentation Award

The author of an awarded presentation will be entitled to:

  • A signed official award certificate;
  • The announcement of their achievement on a special conference webpage;
  • One year membership of the ASFFBC. If already an ASFFBC member, then this offer adds one year to her/his current membership.
  • A personal voucher for a 50% reduced registration fee in one event sponsored by FFC, valid during a 12-month period. This voucher is only available if the presenter attends the closing session and receives the award.

Best Full Paper Award

Best full article will be chosen from participants who submit their full article to the journal of Functional foods in Health and Disease. Article should be generally accepted for publication (decision will be made by the Editorial Team of journal).

Best Special Session Organizer Award

Special sessions are small and specialized events to be held during the conference as a set of oral and poster presentations with a highly specialized theme. The goal of special sessions (minimum 4 papers; maximum 7) is to provide a focused discussion on innovative topics.

Selection Criteria

The awards will be presented to the author(s) of the paper, selected by the Conference Committee and Session Chairs.

The decision criterion will consider both the paper quality and the presentation quality (feedback given by main conference organizers, session chairs, and organizing committee members at the conference venue).


Main Conference Organizers:

Jin-Rong (Joseph) Zhou, Ph.D, Associate Professor of Surgery, Director of Nutrition/Metabolism Laboratory at Department of Surgery, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA

Danik Martirosyan, PhD, President, Functional Food Center/Functional Food Institute, Dallas, TX, USA

Gabriela Riscuta MD, CNS, Program Director, Nutritional Science Research Group, Division of Cancer Prevention, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, MD, USA

Janos Zempleni, Ph.D, Willa Cather Professor of Molecular Nutrition, Director of the Nebraska Center for the Prevention of Obesity Diseases through Dietary Molecules, Director of the Nebraska Gateway to Nutrigenomics, Department of Nutrition and Health Sciences, University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Lincoln, NE, USA

Debasis Bagchi, PhD, Chief Scientific Officer, Cepham Research Center, Piscataway, NJ, USA; Department of Pharmacological and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Houston College of Pharmacy, Houston, TX, USA

Uri Lesmes, PhD, Associate Professor, Head of the Laboratory of Food Chemistry and Bioactives Department of Biotechnology and Food Engineering, Technion – Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel.


Conference Program 

September 22, 2017

8:15 -8:45 Registrations

8:45-8:50 Welcome and Opening Remarks: Jin-Rong (Joseph) Zhou, Co-chairman: Ph.D, Associate Professor of Surgery, Director of Nutrition/Metabolism Laboratory at Department of Surgery, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA; Danik Martirosyan, Co-chairman, PhD: President, Functional Food Center; Dallas, TX, USA.

Session 1: Functional Food Definition, Status, and Regulation. Session chairs: Nicholas V. Perricone, MD, Michigan State University, College of Human Medicine, East Lansing, MI, USA.

8:50-9:15 Danik Martirosyan, PhD, Functional Food Center, USA. FFC's Advancement of functional food definition.

9:15-9:40 Debasis Bagchi, PhD, Professor, Department of Pharmacological and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Houston College of Pharmacy, Houston, TX, USA. Regulation of functional foods in USA and Japan.

9:40-10:05 (Special Lecture) Nicholas V. Perricone, MD, Michigan State University, College of Human Medicine, East Lansing, MI, USA. Water infused with molecular hydrogen increases skin NADH.

10:05-10:15 Coffee Break

Session 2: Engineering bioaccessibility and bioavailability of bioactive compounds. Special Session Chair: Uri Lesmes, PhD, Technion – Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel.

10:15 -10:35 David Julian McClements, PhD, Distinguished Professor, (expert on delivery of bioactives via food emulsions and novel particulates) Fergus Clydesdale Endowed Chair, Department of Food Science, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst, MA, USA. Designing biopolymer microgels for encapsulation, protection, and release of bioactives.

10:35-10:55 Tara Grauwet, PhD, Laboratory of Food Technology, Department of Microbial and Molecular systems, KU Leuven, Belgium. Processing as a tool to modify natural and create process-induced barriers in plant-based foods with the aim of tailoring food digestion.

10:55-11:15 Avi Shpigelman, PhD, Laboratory for novel food and bioprocessing, Faculty of Biotechnology and Food Engineering, Technion, Haifa, Israel. Bioaccessibility of polyphenols – limitations and opportunities.

11:15-11:40 Uri Lesmes, PhD, Associate Professor, Head of the Laboratory of Food Chemistry and Bioactives Department of Biotechnology and Food Engineering, Technion – Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel. Physicochemical engineering of macronutrient digestibility and control of bioactive release in the human gastrointestinal track.


Session 3. Microbiome: Health and Cancer. Session Chair: Gabriela Riscuta MD, CNS, Program Director, Nutritional Science Research Group, Division of Cancer Prevention, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, MD, USA.

11:40-12:00 Amedeo Amedei, PhD, Professor, Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, University of Florence, Viale Pieraccini, Florence, Italy. Functional characterization of specific immune response and comparison of oral and intestinal human microbiota in patients with colorectal cancer after treatment with probiotic / prebiotic.

12:00:12:20 Danyue Zhao, PhD, New Use Agriculture and Natural Plant Products Program, Department of Plant Biology, School of Environmental and Biological Sciences, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey, USA. Insights into bioavailability and microbial catabolism of grape polyphenols in mice using an efficient UPLC-Triple quadrupole-MS/MS method.

12:20- 13:05 Lunch

13:05-1:25 Erika Angle, PhD, CEO and Co-Founder, Ixcela: The Internal Fitness Company, Bedford, MA, USA. Effects of Gut Microbiota Modulation on Performance of Professional Athletes.

13:25-13:45 W.L.Wendy Hsiao, PhD, Professor, State Key Laboratory of Quality Research in Chinese Medicine, Macau University of Science and Technology, Macau, China. Polysaccharides from two medicinal mushrooms Ganoderma lucidum and Poria cocos reveal prebiotic effects in mice.

13:45-14:10 Gabriela Riscuta MD, CNS, Program Director, Nutritional Science Research Group, Division of Cancer Prevention, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda MD, USA. Functional food, microbiome, aging and cancer.

Session 4: Functional Foods and Chronic Diseases. session Chairs: Jin-Rong Zhou, Ph.D, Associate Professor of Surgery, Director of Nutrition/Metabolism Laboratory at Department of Surgery, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA, and Palayakotai Raghavan, PhD, Nanorx Inc. NY, USA.

a. Neurological Diseases

14:10-14:30 Bernd Markert, PhD, Professor, Environmental Institute of Scientific Networks (EISN), Haren, Erika, Germany. Is the biological system of the elements a scientific and practical tool for functional food therapy on chronic diseases? – Lithium accumulating food being given to patients of bipolar disorders might represent a beneficial relationship for curing a chronic neurological disease.

14:30-14:50 Cristiana Caliceti, PhD, Laboratory of Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy. The fermentation with lactic acid bacteria further enhances the immunomodulatory and antioxidant properties of a Carica Papaya Linn formulation in comparison with yeast fermentation.

14:50-15:00 Coffee Break

b. Cardiovascular Diseases

15:00-15:25 Harry G. Preuss, PhD, Department of Biochemistry, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, D.C. Blood Pressure Regulation: Evidence for interplay between common dietary sugars and table salt.

15:25-15:45 Bradley Ferguson, PhD, Assistant Professor, Department of Agriculture, Nutrition and Vet Sciences, The University of Nevada Reno, Reno, NV, USA. Potential implications for dietary HDAC inhibitors in the heart.

15:45-16:05 Chiara Santi, PhD, Department of Sustainable productive and territorial systems, Laboratory of Bioprocesses and Bio products, ENEA Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Sustainable Economic Development, Rome, Italy. Evaluation of the hazelnuts as functional food: molecular effects of long maceration raw kernel extract in HepG2 human hepatocarcinoma cell line.

16:05-16:25 Hossein Mirmiranpour, PhD, MD, Assistant Professor, Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Alborz University of Medical Sciences, Karaj, Iran. Effect of vitamin C supplementation on oxidant and antioxidant status in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

16:25-16:50 Palayakotai Raghavan, PhD, Nanorx Inc. NY, USA. Metadichol ® a novel VDR inverse agonist and control of Hypertension in Patients with Metabolic Syndrome.


16:50-17:30 Session 5: Poster Session

17:30 Conference Closing

17:30-19:00 - Networking Banquet Organized by Catering Departement at Harvard Medical School

September 23, 2017

Session 6: Dietary Exosomes and their Cargos. Special Session Chair: Janos Zempleni, PhD, Professor, University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Lincoln, NE, USA.

8:00-8:25 Bodo Melnik, MD, Professor, Department of Dermatology, Environmental Medicine and Health Theory, University of Osnabrück, Osnabrück, Germany. DNA methyltransferase 1-targeting microRNA-148a of dairy milk: a potential bioactive modifier of the human epigenome.

8:25-8:45 Deborah Fratantonio, PhD, Postdoctoral Research Associate, Department of Nutrition and Health Sciences, University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Lincoln, NE, USA. MicroRNAs in chicken egg exosomes: content and bioavailability in healthy humans.

8:45-9:05 M. Abderrahim Benmoussa, PhD candidate, Department of Microbiology-Infectious Disease and Immunity, and Faculty of Medicine, Université Laval, Quebec, Canada. Characterization of a new functional extracellular vesicle subset in commercial dairy cow milk with protein and small RNA profiles different from canonical milk exosomes.

9:05-9:30 Janos Zempleni, Ph.D, Willa Cather Professor of Molecular Nutrition, Department of Nutrition and Health Sciences, University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Lincoln, NE, USA. The communication of animal and bacterial kingdoms through exosomes and their RNA cargos in bovine milk.

9:30-9:40 Coffee Break

Session 7: Functional Foods with Bioactive Compound(s): Prevention and Management of Non-Communicable Diseases.

9:40-10:00 Sepideh Taheri, PhD, Assistant Professor, Division of General Academic Paediatrics, University of Western Ontario, Consultant Paediatrician at Children’s Hospital of Western Ontario, London Health Sciences Centre, London, ON, Canada. Randomized controlled trial of food elimination for treatment of primary headache in children.

10:00-10:20 Sean Hall, MD, CEO of Medlab Clinical LTD, Sydney Australia. Mitigating the symptoms of chronic diseases through the administration of probiotics.

10:20-10:40 Joan Ifland, PhD, MBA, CEO, Food Addiction Training, LLC, Cincinnati, OH, USA. Processed Food addiction: Evidence for a role in the obesity epidemic.

10:40-11:00 Zeeshan Hafeez, PhD, UR AFPA-équipe PB2P, Université de Lorraine-INRA UC 340, Faculté des Sciences et Technologies, Vandœuvre-lès-Nancy Cedex, France. Anti-inflammatory activity of peptide fractions obtained from casein hydrolysate generated by cell envelope proteinase PrtS purified from S. thermophilus LMD-9-ΔsrtA strain.

11:00-11:20 Simone Parola, PhD, PreventPCB srl, Vergiate (VA) Italy; University of Insubria, Department of Biotecnologie e Scienze Della Vita (DBSV), Vergiate, VA, 21029, Italy. Lentinula edodes and Pleurotus ostreatus: functional food with antioxidant - antimicrobial activity and an important source of Vitamin D and medicinal compounds.

11:20-11:45 Uwe Albrecht, MD, Mediconomics GmbH, Hannover, Germany. Detoxification: Natural scavenger clinoptilolite for removal of heavy metals from the body.

11:45-12:30 Lunch


Session 8: Bioactive food compounds: sources and potential health benefits. Session Chair: Nancy J. Emenaker, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, MD, USA.

12:30-12:55 Francesco Marotta, MD, PhD, Professor, ReGenera Research Group for Aging Intervention, Milan, Italy. Beneficial effect of original powdered fermented papaya preparation (fpp-ori) vs gel form and xylitol in modulating oral metabolome, inflammatory molecules and amino-acid network. A weapon for degerenrative disease?

12:55-13:15 Manashi Bagchi, PhD, Cepham Research Center, Piscataway, NJ, USA. Safety and free testosterone boosting efficacy of a novel curculigo orchioides extract in male rats.

13:15-13:35 Debasis Bagchi, PhD, Chief Scientific Officer, Cepham Research Center, Piscataway, NJ, USA; Department of Pharmacological and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Houston College of Pharmacy, Houston, TX, USA. Clinical evaluation of a standardized Prunus Domestica extract on benign prostrate hyperplasia (BPH) in male volunteers.

13:35-13:55 María Dolores del Castillo, PhD, Head of Food Bioscience group, Department of Food Analysis and Bioactivity, Institute of Food Science Research (CIAL, CSIC-UAM), Madrid, Spain. Lipid biomarkers for validation of spent coffee grounds as a healthy dietary fiber.

13:55-14:20 Nancy J. Emenaker, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, MD, USA. What’s in Your Dietary Fiber Supplement? An Updated Look at the Dietary Supplement Label Database (DSLD) for Determining Total Dietary Fiber Consumption in Community Oncology Health Care Practices.

14:20-14:30 Coffee Break

Session 9: Current Research and Development of New Functional Food Products. Danik Martirosyan, PhD, Functional Food Center, USA.

14:30-14:50 Jyoti D. Vora, PhD, Professor, Head, Department of Biochemistry and Food Science and Quality Control, Ramnarain Ruia College, Matunga, Mumbai, Maharashtra, India. Insight into the biochemical link between biodiversity and nutraceuticals: A case study of Carica papaya.

14:50-15:10 Bainian Feng, PhD, Distinguished Professor, Taihu Scholar, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Jiangnan University, Wuxi, China. Garlic essential oil provides lead discharging effect on human body, an efficacy and mechanism of study.

15:10-15:30 Enrica Bargiacchi, PhD, Researcher Agronomist, Italian Interuniversity Consortium for Science and Technology of Materials, Firenze, Italy. Grape Marc as a source of bioactive compounds for new foods.

15:30-15:50 Bianke Loedolff, PhD, Group Leader (Biopolymer Tailoring/Nutritional Biotechnology), Institute for Plant Biotechnology, Stellenbosch University, South Africa. Bio-fortification of Brassica micro-greens: towards development of a nutritionally enhanced micro-green melange for noncommunicable disease prevention.

15:50-16:10 Tyler W. LeBaron, Executive Director of Molecular Hydrogen Foundation/Institute, Academic Committee of Taishan Institute for Hydrogen Biomedical Research. Hydrogen: an emerging medical gas with clinical significance.

16:10-16:50 Session 10: Poster Session

16:50-17:00 Awards and Certificates

17:00-17:15 Conference Closing

Please note: Schedule subject to change.


Exhibitors Information:

All vendors have a separate exhibitor table at the conference. The two tables will be located near the conference area and will have sufficient access to conference participants. The international conference will attract many experts from food processing companies, universities, research centers, and related industries from around the world, such as local restaurants and bakeries. This will be a great opportunity to introduce yourself to many international organizations. The cost for vendors is $795.00, which includes one (1) full registration for the conference.

There is a limited amount of space. Please purchase your conference registration ticket and provide your company description, which will appear on the conference website with your sponsorship level, or exhibit booth, listed alongside a hyperlink to your website. Limit the company description to no more than 35 words.

You can fill out the registration form and make a payment for the registration fee to become a vendor for this International Conference. An email confirmation will be sent within two days of the submission date.

If you have any questions, feel free to email us at ffc@functionalfoodcenter.com


FFC's Exhibitors at Harvard Medical School (from previous conference)

  • BESO Biological Research Inc., 21660 Copley Dr. Ste# 180, Diamond Bar, CA 91767, USA. Website: http://besoinc.com/home.html. Based in CA, U.S.A. BESO develops nutritional products ranging from daily nutrition to supportive needs. Our products are made with 100% fermented foods that help increase bioavailability and improve nutrient absorption. Our formulation contains a natural (non-synthetic) bio-active compound called 13-Methyltetradecanoic acid.

BESO Logo

  • Danem Dairy Products, Inc., Suleyman Demirel University Technopark, East Campus, 32260 Isparta, Turkey. Web Site: http://www.kefirdanem.com. Danem’s purpose is to protect, maintain and produce genuine kefir grains that contain all of the probiotic bacterial and yeast strains naturally found in traditional kefir. From these grains, we produce our traditional kefir product, Kefirzadem™, with no additives. Using our kefir grains produces kefir with the highest level of natural strains and a magnificent flavor. After a long academic research period, our significant scientific and technical knowledge was transferred to an industrial scale at Danem, Inc. Along with other patent-pending technology, Danem holds three patents on natural kefir and yogurt production from non-GMO, natural probiotic microflora. Danem is the first company in the world that produces significant amounts of non-GMO natural kefir grains, kefir starter culture, natural kefir from kefir grains as well as probiotic yogurt starter culture. Continued research indicates that consumption of our products can contribute significantly to improved health.

Danem Dairy Products Logo

  • Food Science Publisher, 4659 Texas St, San Diego CA, USA. Website: http://functionalfoodscenter.net/food-science-publisher.html. Food Science Publisher is especially interested in human clinical nutrition, functional food science and chronic disease aspects of the publishing field. The company specializes in publishing books in the field of food science, nutrition, functional foods and chronic diseases.

Publisher Logo

  • Vibrant America, 1021 Howard Avenue Suite B, San Carlos, CA 94070-4034, USA. Website: https://www.vibrant-america.com/. Vibrant strives to become the leader in autoimmune diagnostics. Our platform allows us to provide results 4 days sooner than any other regional or specialized laboratory. We are committed to providing the best services and a clinically relevant menu of testing options to accommodate healthcare providers and their patients.

Vibrant America

  • Lifeway Foods, Inc., 6431 West Oakton St. Morton Grove, IL 60053, USA. Website: http://lifewaykefir.com/. Lifeway Foods, America’s leading supplier of the probiotic fermented beverage known as kefir, is on a mission to provide the best probiotic and nutritious foods to consumers. Lifeway has also innovated several new ideas in the dairy industry by introducing breakthrough products. The company is committed to four ideals: all natural hormone and GMO-free ingredients, philanthropy, environmental responsibility, and local farming sustainability.

Lifeway Logo

Osato Research Institute, 1956 Inatomi, Ono-cho, Ibi-gun, Gifu, 501-0501, Japan. Website: http://en.ori-japan.com/. Osato Research Institute works with universities and institutes around the world to support research on FFP® (Fermented Papaya Preparation) and its effect on healthy aging. One of their many goals to is to reduce medical costs associated with aging through preventative therapeutic strategies and education.

FPP Round Logo

ORI Logo


Payment Options

The 22nd International Conference of the Functional Food Center (FFC) and the 10th Symposium of the Academic Society for Functional Foods and Bioactive Compounds (ASFFBC) will be held on September 22-23, 2017. The FFC accepts new registrations for the conference until the official start date. If you plan on registering for the conference, your presentation will not be scheduled until proper payment has been received. The FFC accepts a multitude of different payments, including check, credit card, PayPal, and bank transfers. All payments must be made to Functional Food Center in US dollars.

When paying with a credit card you must submit the payment through the FFC website. You must use MasterCard, Visa, Discover, or American Express for the payment to be accepted. It can take up to 3-4 business days for the payment to go through and appear on your credit card. A receipt for proof of purchase will be sent to you. It will come with confirmation of your credit card authorization.

When using a bank transfer to make the payment, you are required to send an email after making the payment to ffc@functionalfoodcenter.com. The email must include the following information: date of transfer, amount, invoice number, and name of remitter.

When paying your registration payment with a check, make sure that all checks are made out to Functional Food Center, using US dollars. If you are using a check outside of the United States, please talk to your bank about whether the check will be accepted in the United States’ banks. Any fees that are applicable to international checks will be deducted from the payment, and may result in an incomplete registration. Checks must be mailed to 4659 Texas St, Unit 15, San Diego, CA 92116. An email will be sent confirming that the FFC received payment.

If you have any questions regarding the payment options for the conference, please contact us.

You may click here to make a payment for the conference registration fee.

Reserve Your Space Today


Poster Session

Conference Poster Presentations: Poster presentations give the audience a clear visual of the presenter's work in a simple format. The reasonable size for posters is 2.5-3.0 feet high by 3.5-4 feet wide.

Poster presentation recommendations:

  1. Present the title, the author(s), affiliation(s), and a description of the research, along with highlighting the abstract's major elements.
  2. Minimize detail and try to use simple statements. Keep it short and easy to read.
  3. Remember that pictures, tables, and figures are key to any poster display.
  4. If possible, use color in your visuals.
  5. Don't overwhelm the audience with excessive information. Instead, construct a display that enhances the presentation.
  6. At least 50% of the surface area should be used for photos, graphs and diagrams.
  7. Use a clear structure and layout.
  8. Use complementary colors. Use black or dark blue for text. Too much color can be hard to read!
  9. One or two large, high quality photographs attract attention.
  10. Your title should be a condensed statement of the main idea of your poster. It should be large and clear.
  11. Your poster title should be easily readable from a distance of 3-4 meters. Include author(s) name(s), and address(es).
  12. We recommend the following sections on the poster: Abstract, Introduction, Methods, Tables, Figures, Results, and Conclusions.
  13. Please confirm your poster number on the list. The posters with odd number will be presented on September 22, 2017 and the posters with even number will be presented on September 23, 2017.
  14. Please put up your own poster in the position indicated by your presentation number by noon of each day. Presentation numbers are already indicated on display panels. Please check your presentation number and be careful to put up your poster on the correct panel. Please use pins to put up posters. Please do not use glue or sellotape.
  15. Please present your work in front of your own poster during the poster session.
  16. The best poster presentation award will be chosen by votes of all participants.
  17. Posters will be changed every day. Please help by taking your own poster down. Posters still displayed after the removal time has passed will be disposed of by the secretary the following day.

Posters Accepted for Presentation: (from previous conference)

P1

Zohreh Hamidi-Esfahani

Arachidonic acid production using Mortierella alpinain batch and fed-batch fermentation

P2

Dimou Charalampia

Correlation of specific functional foods consumption with anthropometric characteristics and body composition on a sample of 18-65 years old aged adults from Greece

P3

Dimou Charalampia

Production of innovative Cistus Creticus leaf-flavored extra virgin olive oil based products of industrial interest with functional activity

P4

André Moreira-Rosário

Impact of daily consumption of wheat germ on human health: a randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover trial

P5

Norma-Aurea Rangel-Vázquez

Nanotechnology in the analysis of Polyurethane/Graphene/ Polymethylmetacrylate for new prosthesis for diabetic patients using Quantum mechanics and Monte Carlo simulation

P6

Jitka Ulrichová

Effect of cranberry extract on hepatic and intestinal cytochromes P450 in normal and obese mice – in vivo study

P7

Asma K. Alhindi

In adults’ athletics and what is the time, energy, and macronutrient requirement to gain lean body mass?

P8

Bernard Downs

Sustained safety and efficacy of a novel KD120 MEC multi-enzyme complex (N-Sorb®) in human volunteers

P9

Takashi Sato

Lysophosphatidic acid promotes the tube formation of human dermal lymphatic endothelial cells in an MMP-activity-dependent manner

P10

Sheila Wicks

Ribes nigrum L. (Grossulariaceae) and Sambus nigra L. (Adoxaceae) extracts enhance growth and inhibit apoptosis in rat L6 muscle cells

P11

Veronica Oluwatoyin Odubanjo

Cognitive enhancing effects of aqueous extract of two medicinal plants (Tetrapleura tetraptera and Quassia undulata) in scopolamine induced amnesic rats

P12

Olubunmi Ajayi

Antidiabetic effect of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) based diets on blood glucose of alloxan – induced diabetes rats

P13

Firouzeh Dehghan

Aqeuous extract of crategus monogyna with aerobic training improves angiogenic mediators

P14

Zohreh Hamidi-Esfahani

Optimization of encapsulation conditions of vitamin C within yeast cell Saccharomyces cervisiea as biocapsule

P15

Radha Madhyastha

Aloin prevents osteoclastogenesis via downregulation of microRNA-21

P16

Thao L. Nguyen

Real time in vivo monitoring of green tea polyphenol (−)-Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate’s effect in resolving neutrophil-mediated inflammation in transgenic zebrafish

P17

Huda Mobarki

How much weight loss is expected after each type of bariatric surgery procedure?

P19

Abhilasha Singh

Aegeline vs statin in the treatment of Hypercholesterolemia: A comprehensive study in rat model of liver steatosis

P20

Carla Schwanke

Association between metabolic syndrome and polyunsaturated fatty acids in elderly

P21

Norma-Aurea Rangel-Vázquez

Analysis of the absorption of drugs in hydrogels for treatments of skin cancer using nanotechnology

P22

Maksim Khotimchenko

Instant pectin from sea grass Phyllospadix iwatensis as a key ingredient of the functional food with radioisotope-removing properties

P23

Deniz Sezgin

New approaches to changing healthy life expectations: functional food in Turkey

P24

Maria Gabriela Valle Gottlieb

Functional properties of red-aroeira or pink pepper (Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi)

P25

Mei-Jun Zhu

Red raspberry consumption suppresses NLRP3 inflammasome and attenuates metabolic syndromes in diet-induced obese mice

P26

Thunnalin Winuprasith

Encapsulation of vitamin D 3 in emulsion-based delivery systems using microfibrillated cellulose extracted from mangosteen rind

P27

Carla Schwanke

Kefir effect on metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance and obesity in adults and elderly: A systematic review

P28

Deborah Fratantonio

MicroRNAs in chicken egg exosomes: content and bioavailability in healthy humans

P29

Doman Kim

The effect of fermented buckwheat on producing L-carnitine and Gamma-aminobutyric acid enriched designer eggs

P30

Marius Rusu

Bioactive compounds from walnut (Juglans regia L.) septum extracts: antioxidant and cytotoxic activity

P31

Jian-ping Chen

Effect of YH0618 soup on chemotherapy-induced toxicity in cancer patients: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

P32

Amaia Iriondo De Hond

Spent coffee grounds activate intestinal motility and are safe upon chronic treatment. Radiographic and histological study in rats

P33

Eden Birhanu

Effect of moringa and maize flour blending ratio on the functional, nutritional and sensory quality of wheat based biscuit

P34

Danyue Zhao

Synergistic application of tea extract and lactic acid bacterial fermentation in enhancing bioavailability and anti-oxidative effectiveness of tea flavonoids in vitro and in vivo

P35

Thanutchaporn Kumrungsee

Challenging of finding a new type of calmodulin inhibitors

P36

Zhiyun Du

Chemical compositions and bioactivities of essential oils from eleven Curcuma species

P37

Nattiporn Ornthanalai

Effects of jerusalem artichoke snack bar on gastric emptying and colon transit: A randomized crossover trial

P38

Tony L. Brown

The role of probiotics in microbial resistance treatment and why they should be added to the World Health Organization’s List of Essential Medicines

P39

María Dolores del Castillo

Intake of antioxidant dietary fiber from spent coffee grounds improves the circadian rhythm and body weight management in human adults

P40

Agnieszka Szczepankowska

Composition of recombinant Lactococcus bacteria ameliorate the symptoms of EAE -multiple sclerosis animal model, in rats


Registration Form


Speakers (from previous conference)

Janos Zempleni, Ph.D, Willa Cather Professor of Molecular Nutrition, Director of the Nebraska Center for the Prevention of Obesity Diseases through Dietary Molecules, Director of the Nebraska Gateway to Nutrigenomics, Department of Nutrition and Health Sciences, University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Lincoln, NE, USA. The communication of animal and bacterial kingdoms through exosomes and their RNA cargos in bovine milk

Bodo Melnik, MD, Professor, Department of Dermatology, Environmental Medicine and Health Theory, University of Osnabrück, Osnabrück, Germany. DNA methyltransferase 1-targeting microRNA-148a of dairy milk: a potential bioactive modifier of the human epigenome

Deborah Fratantonio, PhD, Postdoctoral Research Associate, Department of Nutrition and Health Sciences, University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Lincoln, NE, USA. MicroRNAs in chicken egg exosomes: content and bioavailability in healthy humans

Sepideh Taheri, PhD, Assistant Professor, Division of General Academic Paediatrics, University of Western Ontario, Consultant Paediatrician at Children’s Hospital of Western Ontario, London Health Sciences Centre, London, ON, Canada. Randomized controlled trial of food elimination for treatment of primary headache in children

Jin-Rong Zhou, Ph.D, Associate Professor of Surgery, Director of Nutrition/Metabolism Laboratory at Department of Surgery, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. Session Chair: Functional foods and cancer

Bernd Markert, PhD, Professor, Environmental Institute of Scientific Networks (EISN), Haren/Erika, Germany. Is the biological system of the elements a scientific and practical tool for functional food therapy on chronic diseases? – Lithium accumulating food being given to patients of bipolar disorders might represent a beneficial relationship for curing a chronic neurological disease

Manashi Bagchi, PhD, Cepham Research Center, Piscataway, NJ, USA. Safety and free testosterone boosting efficacy of a novel curculigo orchioides extract in male rats

Sean Hall, MD, CEO of Medlab Clinical LTD, Sydney Australia. Presentation topic: Mitigating the symptoms of chronic diseases through the administration of probiotics

Palayakotai Raghavan, PhD, Nanorx Inc. NY, USA. Metadichol ® a novel VDR inverse agonist and control of hypertension in patients with metabolic syndrome.

Debasis Bagchi, PhD, Professor, Chief Scientific Officer, Cepham Research Center, Piscataway, NJ, USA; & Department of Pharmacological and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Houston College of Pharmacy, Houston, TX, USA. Clinical evaluation of a standardized prunus domestica extract on benign prostrate hyperplasia (BPH) in male volunteers, safety and free testosterone boosting efficacy of a novel Curculigo orchioides extract in male rats

Danik M. Martirosyan, PhD, Functional Food Center, Dallas, TX, USA. Food bioactive compounds and functional foods

Harry G. Preuss, PhD, Dept of Biochemistry, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, D.C. Blood pressure regulation: evidence for interplay between common dietary sugars and table salt

Hossein Mirmiranpour, PhD, MD, Assistant Professor, Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Alborz University of Medical Sciences, Karaj, Iran. Effect of vitamin C supplementation on oxidant and antioxidant status in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

Nicholas V. Perricone, MD, Michigan State University, College of Human Medicine, East Lansing, MI, USA. Water infused with molecular hydrogen increases skin NADH

Bradley Ferguson, PhD, Assistant Professor, Department of Agriculture, Nutrition and Vet Sciences, The University of Nevada Reno, Reno, NV, USA. Potential implications for dietary HDAC inhibitors in the heart

Uri Lesmes, PhD, Associate Professor, Head of the Laboratory of Food Chemistry and Bioactives
Department of Biotechnology and Food Engineering, Technion – Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel. Physicochemical engineering of macronutrient digestibility and control of bioactive release in the human gastrointestinal tract

David Julian McClements, PhD, Distinguished Professor, (expert on delivery of bioactives via food emulsions and novel particulates) Fergus Clydesdale Endowed Chair, Department of Food Science, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst, MA, USA. Designing biopolymer microgels for encapsulation, protection, and release of bioactives

Avi Shpigelman, PhD, Laboratory for novel food and bioprocessing, Faculty of Biotechnology and Food Engineering, Technion, Haifa, Israel. Bioaccessibility of polyphenols – limitations and opportunities

Tara Grauwet, PhD, Laboratory of Food Technology, Department of Microbial and Molecular systems, KU Leuven, Belgium. Processing as a tool to modify natural and create process-induced barriers in plant-based foods with the aim of tailoring food digestion

Bainian Feng, PhD, Distinguished Professor, Taihu Scholar, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Jiangnan University, Wuxi, China. Garlic essential oil provides lead discharging effect on human body, an efficacy and mechanism of study

Tyler W. LeBaron, Executive Director of Molecular Hydrogen Foundation/Institute, Academic Committee of Taishan Institute for Hydrogen Biomedical Research. Hydrogen: an emerging medical gas with clinical significance

Vanisha S Nambiar, PhD, Associate Professor, Department of Foods and Nutrition, Faculty of Family and Community Sciences, The Maharaja SayajiRao University of Baroda, Vadodara, Gujarat. India. Understanding the use of bioactive compound for the reduction of inflammation and oxidative stress using nutrigenomics

Amedeo Amedei, PhD, Professor, Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, University of Florence, Viale Pieraccini, Florence, Italy. Functional characterization of specific immune response and comparison of oral and intestinal human microbiota in patients with colorectal cancer after treatment with probiotic / prebiotic

Chiara Santi, PhD, Department of Sustainable productive and territorial systems, Laboratory of Bioprocesses and Bio products, ENEA Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Sustainable Economic Development, Rome, Italy. Evaluation of the hazelnuts as functional food: molecular effects of long maceration raw kernel extract in HepG2 human hepatocarcinoma cell line

Zeeshan Hafeez, PhD, UR AFPA-équipe PB2P, Université de Lorraine-INRA UC 340, Faculté des Sciences et Technologies-B.P.70239, Vandœuvre-lès-Nancy Cedex, France. Anti-inflammatory activity of peptide fractions obtained from casein hydrolysate generated by cell envelope proteinase PrtS purified from S. thermophilus LMD-9-ΔsrtA strain

Bianke Loedolff, PhD, Group Leader (Biopolymer Tailoring/Nutritional Biotechnology), Institute for Plant Biotechnology, Stellenbosch University, South Africa. Bio-fortification of Brassica micro-greens: towards development of a nutritionally enhanced micro-green melange for noncommunicable disease prevention

Francesco Marotta, MD, PhD, Professor, ReGenera Research Group for Aging Intervention, Milan, Italy. Beneficial effect of original powdered fermented papaya preparation (fpp-ori) vs gel form and xylitol in modulating oral metabolome, inflammatory molecules and amino-acid network. A weapon for degerenrative disease?

Victor Kipnis, PhD, Biometry Group, Division of Cancer Prevention, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, MD, 20892, USA. Multiplicity and selectivity in biomedical research: a view of a statistician

Gabriela Riscuta MD, CNS, Program Director, Nutritional Science Research Group, Division of Cancer Prevention, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, MD, USA. Functional food, microbiome, aging and cancer

Simone Parola, PhD, PreventPCB srl, Vergiate (VA) Italy; University of Insubria, Department of Biotecnologie e Scienze Della Vita (DBSV), Vergiate, VA, 21029, Italy. Lentinula edodes and Pleurotus ostreatus: functional food with antioxidant - antimicrobial activity and an important source of Vitamin D and medicinal compounds

Jyoti D. Vora, PhD, Head, Department of Biochemistry & Food Science and Quality Control, Ramnarain Ruia College, Matunga, Mumbai, India. Insight into the biochemical link between biodiversity and nutraceuticals: a case study of Carica papaya

Enrica Bargiacchi, PhD, Researcher Agronomist, Italian Interuniversity Consortium for Science and Technology of Materials, Firenze, Ital. Grape marc as a source of bioactive compounds for new foods

Cristiana Caliceti, PhD, Laboratory of Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy. The fermentation with lactic acid bacteria further enhances the immunomodulatory and antioxidant properties of a Carica Papaya Linn formulation in comparison with yeast fermentation

Thanutchaporn Kumrungsee, PhD, Graduate School of Biosphere Science, Hiroshima University, Japan. Decreased levels of putative heart protective metabolites in heart tissues of rats fed a vitamin B6 deficient diet: a metabolomics approach

María Dolores del Castillo, PhD, Head of Food Bioscience group, Department of Food Analysis and Bioactivity, Institute of Food Science Research (CIAL, CSIC-UAM), 28049 Madrid, Spain. Lipid biomarkers for validation of spent coffee grounds as a healthy dietary fiber

Danyue Zhao, PhD, Post-doc Associate, Department of Plant Biology, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey. Insights into bioavailability and microbial catabolism of grape polyphenols in mice using an efficient UPLC-Triple quadrupole-MS/MS methodby

Erika Angle, PhD, CEO and Co-Founder, Ixcela: The Internal Fitness Company, Bedford, MA, USA. Effects of gut microbiota modulation on performance of professional athletes

W.L.Wendy Hsiao, PhD, State Key Laboratory of Quality Research in Chinese Medicine, Macau University of Science and Technology, Avenida Wai lung, Taipa, Macau, China. Polysaccharides from two medicinal mushrooms Ganoderma lucidum and Poria cocos reveal prebiotic effects in mice

M. Abderrahim Benmoussa, PhD candidate, Department of Microbiology-Infectious Disease and Immunity, and Faculty of Medicine, Université Laval, 2705 Blvd Laurier, Room T1-49 Quebec, QC G1V 4G2 Canada. Characterization of a new functional extracellular vesicle subset in commercial dairy cow milk with protein and small RNA profiles different from canonical milk exosomes

Uwe Albrecht, MD, Mediconomics GmbH, Hannover, Germany. Detoxification: Natural scavenger clinoptilolite for removal of heavy metals from the body

Nancy J. Emenaker, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, MD, USA. What’s in Your Dietary Fiber Supplement? An Updated Look at the Dietary Supplement Label Database (DSLD) for Determining Total Dietary Fiber Consumption in Community Oncology Health Care Practices.

Francesco Marotta, MD, PhD, Chief Scientific Officer, ReGenera Research Group for Aging Intervention, Milano and Chief Medical Officer, Gender Healthy Aging Unit, Milano Medical, Italy. Beneficial effect on original powdered fermented papaya preparation (FPP-ORI) vs gel form and xylitol in modulating oral metabolome, inflammatory molecules and amino-acid network. A weapon for degenerative disease?


Generation 100 Logo Metadichol Image

Sponsorship Opportunities

Dear Future Sponsor,

I wish to inform you about an excellent sponsorship opportunity for your company to gain high-quality exposure in the health food industry. Functional foods and bioactive compounds are currently receiving an increased amount of attention from the scientific community, as well as the public. The Functional Food Center’s 22nd International Conference will be held at the Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. It will be timely in presenting new and relevant information focused on the importance of bioactive compounds and functional foods.

Conference Center at Harvar Since 1998, the Functional Food Center has been a pioneer in the functional food industry. It combines cutting-edge expertise in the biomedical sciences with practical business experience, to aid further research, development, and commercialization of functional food innovations in both domestic and international markets. The Functional Food Center connects a global network of professionals (scientists, functional food experts, and food industry representatives) to a conducive environment for innovative research collaboration. Since 2004, the FFC has organized conferences together with top universities. Scientists, researchers, and food industry professionals present their research and discoveries about healthy, functional, and medical foods with bioactive compounds. In response to the growth of this field, we are proud to introduce the Academic Society for Functional Foods and Bioactive Compounds.

This society of medical doctors, scientists, dietitians, nutritionists and other food and medical industry professionals will be strictly dedicated to the research and development of functional and medical foods, bioactive compounds, and the discovery of new ingredients.

Partnering with the Functional Food Center by sponsoring our upcoming conference will provide your company with several valuable benefits. These include but are not limited to:

1) Your names and logos endlessly stay on our website, which has about 4800 visitors per month, and have an opening rate of 13% for the newsletter.

2) Your logo will be included in the conference website, promotional materials, and Functional Food Center’s bi-monthly newsletter, which is received by over 700,000 readers including scientists, medical doctors, nutritionists and dieticians.

3) FDA, USDA, and NIH representatives attend our conferences, and you may contact them directly at the time of conference.

4) An option for annual and lifetime sponsorship.

5) Each level of sponsorship will contain a certain number of attendee rights, which allow free-of-charge admission to our conference.

6) You will have the unique opportunity to meet with decision-makers in this field, receive information/support on how to make a new, healthy product, and provide oral presentations about a related topic.

7) The Academic Society for Functional Foods and Bioactive Compounds and Functional Food Center can advise you on how to create a new, healthy and functional product (this can be a separate discussion).

We look forward hearing from you.

Sincerely,

Danik M. Martirosyan, PhD

President of Academic Society for Functional Foods and Bioactive Compounds,

Founder of Functional Food Center, Inc.


Sponsorship Prospectus

Please join us for an exciting opportunity!

We are pleased to invite you to a conference in Boston, MA, USA, on September 20-21, 2018.

The Functional Food Center, The Journal of Functional Foods in Health and Disease, Academic Society for Functional Foods and Bioactive Compounds would all be honored for you to join us at our conference. We will bring together experts in medicine, biology and the food industry to discuss the contribution of functional/medical foods and bioactive compounds in the prevention and management of chronic diseases.

With over 175 expected participants, the conference provides a great opportunity to increase the visibility of your company and exhibit products and services to an international group of researchers, clinicians, post-docs and next-generation scientists.

Sponsors and exhibitors will be exposed to a wide audience and will have many promotional opportunities.

Below are details regarding the sponsorship and exhibitor packages. We hope you find the right package for your needs. We look forward to collaborating with you in the future, and hope to see you in Germany.

Since 2004, the Functional Food Center has organized conferences where scientists, researchers, and food industry professionals present their discoveries in the realm of functional foods and bioactive compounds.

The Conference Organizing Committee is pleased to announce the 24th International Conference of FFC - 12th International Symposium of ASFFBC will be held at the Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA on September 20-21, 2018.

The Functional Food Center is a valuable resource for businesses in the food industry. The benefits of sponsorship include but are not limited to:

  • Developing various connections through conference participation, such as medical doctors, food scientists, food industry representatives, dieticians and nutritionists.
  • Information on the latest research and discoveries in the realm of functional foods and bioactive compounds, to develop, market and commercialize healthy products.
  • The ability (if eligible) to gain recognition in the food industry by joining our board of Medical and Food Industry Experts.

Sponsorship funding goes to support conference organization and conference promotion. We are also willing to work with companies who are interested in specifically sponsoring student registration, student travel, international scientist travel, conference lunches, conference receptions, or abstract book publication.

Co-chairman: Danik M. Martirosyan, PhD, President, Functional Food Center/Functional Food Institute; Editor-In-Chief, The Journal of Functional Foods in Health and Disease, Dallas, TX, USA.


Sponsorship Levels and Benefits:

Sponsorship Type / Benefit

Diamond

Platinum

Gold

Silver

Bronze

Sponsorships Available

1

2

3

6

No Limit

Cost

$40,000

$20,000

$10,000

$5,000

$2,500

Attendee Rights

5 Free

4 Free

3 Free

2 Free

1 Free

Lifetime Sponsorship

Yes

Annual Sponsorship

Yes

Yes

*Display Table

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Logo Included in Conference Website

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Logo Included in Promotional Materials

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Acknowledgement in Abstract Book

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Distribution of Company Brochure

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

**Conduct Special Session

Yes

Yes

Yes

***Logo Included in Newsletters

Yes

Yes

Yes

Logo Displayed in Meeting Room

Yes

Yes

****Advertisement in Abstract Book

Yes (1 Page)

Yes (1 Page)

Yes (1/2 Page)

Logo Included on Conference Folder

Yes

Yes

Signage Rights

Yes

*At each conference, an area is reserved for exhibitors. However, because our conferences are held at universities, space is limited. Therefore registration is on a first-come, first-served basis.

**Your company may conduct their own special session regarding a specific topic of your choice at the conference. This is an excellent way to connect with possible collaborates with similar interests.

***Your company’s logo will be included (and linked to your company website) in our bi-monthly Functional Foods in Health and Disease Journal newsletter. It has over 450,000 subscribers including scientists, medical doctors, dietitians and nutritionists. The logo will also be included in our newsletter for the Academic Society of Functional Foods and Bioactive Compounds, which has over 2,000 members.

****In addition to the acknowledgement, Gold sponsors will receive a ½ page of advertising space in the abstract book, and both platinum and diamond sponsors will receive a full page of advertising space. This is a great way to promote your company and its products.


If you have any questions or need additional information, please contact us.

Options

Benefits

Cost

Sponsorship for Scientific Sessions

(4 available)

Sponsor recognition at the beginning of the scientific session

Sponsor name and logo will be included in the conference program, abstract book and websites

Name/logo will be included in every upcoming newsletter to more than 450,000 readers including medical doctors, scientists, etc.

$5,000 each

Social Activities Welcome Reception

(1 available)

Sponsor recognition by room signage

Sponsor name and logo will be included in the conference program and abstract book and websites

$4,500 partial

$9,000 exclusive

Badges and Lanyards

Sponsor name and logo will be included in the conference program and abstract book and websites

$2,000 exclusive

Pens

Sponsor name and logo will be included in the conference program and abstract book and websites

$2,000 exclusive

Bags

Sponsor name and logo will be included in the conference program and abstract book and websites

$2,000 exclusive

Lanyards, Pens, Badges and Bags

Sponsor name and logo will be included in the conference program and abstract book and websites

Name/logo will be included in every upcoming newsletter to more than 450,000 readers including medical doctors, scientists, etc.

$5,000 each

Conference Book Advertisement

The sponsor can place one (1) full-page advertisement (black and white) at the end of the conference program and abstract book

Sponsor name and logo will be included in the conference program and abstract book and websites

$1,000

Exhibitors

Provided with one table close to the conference area with sufficient access to coneference participants

Company description on FFC website

Includes one (1) full registration admission

$1,195

Lunches (2 available)

Name/logo will be included in every upcoming newsletter to more than 450,000 readers including medical doctors, scientists, etc.

One lunch per day; two lunches over two days

Sponsor name and logo will be included in the conference program and abstract book and websites

$2,000 per day

$3,500 exclusive

Daily Tea and Coffee Breaks

(5 available)

Five breaks over three days

Sponsor name and logo will be included in the conference program and abstract book and websites

Name/logo will be included in every upcoming newsletter to more than 450,000 readers including medical doctors, scientists, etc.

$1,000 per day

$4,000 exclusive

Banquet (1 available)

$6,000

Terms of Agreement

  1. Sponsorship will be awarded on a first-come, first-serve basis. Sponsorship will not be reserved until full payment is received.
  2. The sponsor is responsible for all materials, printing, customization and shipping-related costs associated with supplying the logo materials to FFC

Our Partners/Sponsors:

Regenera Logo

Generation 100 Logo

Technology Networks Logo

Functional Food Center Logo

The Academic Society of Functional Foods and Bioactive Compounds


Main Conference Topics/Sessions

Session: Functional Food Definition and the Status of Functional Foods in Japan, China, USA and other Countries

  • The regulations, policy, and labeling of functional foods in Japan
  • Weaknesses and strong points of FOSHU/Food for Special Health Usage
  • What is the status of Functional Foods in the USA? Expert opinions from NIH, USDA, and FDA
  • How the new definition of Functional Foods can help to improve the status of functional foods word wide

Session: Functional Foods and Obesity

  • Epidemiology of obesity
  • The modern mechanisms of obesity; energy metabolism and obesity; neurobiological mechanisms of obesity; microbiological mechanisms of obesity; pathophysiologic mechanisms of obesity
  • Biomarkers of obesity
  • The effects of functional food and bioactive compounds on biomarkers of obesity
  • Medical foods for obesity

Session: Functional Foods and Diabetes

  • Epidemiology of diabetes
  • The modern mechanisms of diabetes
  • Biomarkers of diabetes
  • The effects of functional food and bioactive compounds on biomarkers of diabetes
  • Medical foods for diabetes

Session: Functional Foods and Neurological Diseases

  • Epidemiology of mental and neurological diseases
  • Mechanisms of neurological diseases
  • Biomarkers of different mental and neurological diseases
  • The effects of functional food and bioactive compounds on biomarkers of neurological diseases
  • Functional foods for mental and neurological diseases
  • Medical foods for neurological diseases

Session: Functional Foods and Cardiovascular Diseases (CVD)

  • Epidemiology of CVD
  • Biomarkers of different cardiovascular diseases
  • The effects of functional food and bioactive compounds on biomarkers of cardiovascular diseases
  • Medical foods for CVD

Session: Functional Foods and Cancer

  • Epidemiology of Cancer
  • Biomarkers of different types of cancer
  • The effects of functional food and bioactive compounds on biomarkers of different types of cancer
  • Medical Foods for the Cancer

Session: Functional Foods with Bioactive Compound(s): Prevention and Management of Non-communicable Diseases

  • Functional foods and other non-communicable diseases
  • Bioactive compounds and other non-communicable diseases
  • The effects of medical food on biomarkers of non-communicable diseases

Session: Safety of the Bioactive Compounds and Functional Foods

  • Food-Drug Interactions
  • Safety of bioactive compounds at efficacious levels
  • Safety of functional foods at efficacious levels
  • Regulatory issues and health claims

Session: Biomarkers and Functional Food

  • Biomarkers and functional foods
  • Biomarkers available for assessing diet-related changes
  • How can biomarkers improve functional food products development process?
  • The importants of Monitoring Miomarkers in Functional food Science
  • FDA’s Biomarker Qualification Program and creation of new functional foods

Special Session: Functional Food, Microbiome and Cancer. Session Chair: Gabriela Riscuta MD, CNS, Program Director, Nutritional Science Research Group, Division of Cancer Prevention, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, MD, USA

Special Session: Dietary Exosomes and their Cargos. Session Chair: Janos Zempleni, PhD, Willa Cather Professor of Molecular Nutrition, Director of the Nebraska Center for the Prevention of Obesity Diseases through Dietary Molecules, Director of the Nebraska Gateway to Nutrigenomics, Department of Nutrition and Health Sciences, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE, USA

  • DietaryRNAs and non-coding RNAs
  • Dietary exosomes
  • MicroRNAs from foods
  • MicroRNAs are bioactive compounds
  • Bioavailability of MicroRNAs

Special Session: Nanotechnology for drug and bioactive compounds delivery systems. Session Chair: Rangel-Vázquez, PhD, Research Professor at Technological Institute of Aguascalientes (ITA), Mexico

Special Session: Coffee consumption benefits and adverse events: Session Chair: Gabriela Riscuta MD, CNS, Program Director, Nutritional Science Research Group, Division of Cancer Prevention, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, MD, USA

  • Coffee composition and nutritional information
  • Identification and quantification of bioactive compounds in coffee
  • Coffee and its consumption: Benefits and risks, epidemiological and clinical studies
  • Coffee consumption and risk of chronic disease: Clinical and epidemiological studies
  • Functional properties of coffee and coffee by-products

Special session: Engineering bioaccessibility and bioavailability of bioactive compounds. Session Chair: Uri Lesmes, PhD, Associate Professor, Head of the Laboratory of Food Chemistry and Bioactives, Department of Biotechnology and Food Engineering, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel

  • Food structuring and bioaccessibility/ bioavailability
  • Edible delivery systems for bioactive compounds
  • Micro- and nano-encapsulation
  • Impact of processing technologies/conditions on bioaccessibility/ bioavailability
  • Underlying mechanisms of bioaccessibility/ bioavailability

Session: Current Research and Development of New Functional Food Products.

  • Incentives for functional food research and development
  • Consumer acceptance of functional food products
  • Functional food composition and dietary intake databases
  • Food vehicles for delivery bioactive compounds
  • Research, development and marketing of new functional food products

Venue and Accommodation

Conference Center at Harvard

The conference will take place at the Joseph B. Martin Conference Center at Harvard Medical School on September 20-21, 2018. Please read on to find more information regarding the venue, hotel, and possible places to visit while staying in Boston!

Venue

Joseph B. Martin Conference Center at Harvard Medical School

The conference will be held at the Joseph B. Martin Conference Center (77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston, MA). The conference center is located within The New Research Building at Harvard Medical School. Please refer to the campus map for directions. If you have any general question about the conference room location, directions, parking, etc., please call the conference center at 617-432-8990.


Accommodations: Recommended Hotels

342 Longwood Avenue
Boston, MA 02115
617-731-4700
www.innatlongwood.com
This is located within walking distance of MCCHMS.

138 St. James Avenue
Boston, MA 0221
617-267 5300
www.Fairmont.com/copley-plaza-boston
This is about 10 minute cab ride from the facility and also accessible on the MBTA.

40 Webster Street
Brookline, MA 02446
617-734-1393
www.brooklinecourtyard.com
Located 1.5 miles from the Conference Center;
Complimentary Shuttle Service to
Longwood Medical Area

1200 Beacon Street
Brookline, MA 02446
617-277-1200
www.holidayinn.com
Located 1.5 miles from the Conference Center;
Complimentary Shuttle Service to
Longwood Medical Area

Sheraton Boston
Westin Boston & Waterfront
W Hotel Boston
www.Starwoodhotels.com
The Sheraton and Westin are about 10 minute cab ride from the facility and also accessible on the MBTA.

Crosstown Center
811 Massachusetts Ave Boston
617- 445-6400
www.bostonhamptoninn.com
Complimentary Shuttle Service to
Longwood Medical Area

Boston Back Bay - Fenway
125 Brookline Avenue
Boston, MA 02215
617-236-8787
www.residenceinnbackbay.com
This is located within walking distance
of MCCHMS or a short cab ride.

Hotel Commonwealth
500 Commonwealth Avenue
Boston, MA 02215
(617) 933-5000
www.hotelcommonwealth.com
This is located within
a short cab ride.


Tourism

Boston

Boston is one of America’s oldest cities. Since 1822, it served as the economic and cultural hub of New England. Over 617,000 residents inhabit this city and millions more visit each year for the chance to immerse themselves in Boston’s rich history and vibrant culture. Home to many world-class educational institutions such as Harvard University, Boston College, Berklee College of Music, and MIT, the Boston area is a mecca for academic excellence. In addition, Boston boasts some of the best inpatient hospitals in the world. Through museums, nightlife, restaurants, and sports teams, Boston offers all the amenities and excitement of a modern metropolitan city, while managing to maintain its welcoming atmosphere and historic roots.

Places to Visit

Newbury Street: Boston’s most captivating street offers eight blocks of world-renowned restaurants, coffee shops, nightlife, and shopping. With a wide variety of destinations that accommodate all ages and price ranges, Newbury Street has something for everyone. Try Stephanie’s on Newbury for a meal with a view, or just take a walk along the street to soak up all its unique charm and ambiance.

Duck Tours: Take the Boston Duck Tours that take you to various popular tourist spots on both land and sea! Here you can explore a variety of destinations and capture beautiful photos without ever having to leave your seat.

Freedom Trail: For a one-of-a-kind history lesson, follow the freedom trail to see see 16 different historical sites. This 4 km walking trail includes museums, meetinghouses, and churches. Visitors can take a self-guided tour, or opt for a guided one depending on personal preference and time restraints.

Faneuil Hall: Located in the heart of downtown Boston, you can experience the marketplace that has been hosting shoppers since 1742. This eclectic urban marketplace lets you dine, shop, and even enjoy some of Boston’s best street performers all at once. Additionally, its location right across from the New England Aquarium allows you to see two prominent Boston attractions in one afternoon.

Museums: With its vast historic and academic roots, it is no wonder Boston holds a wide array of museums. The Boston Museum of Science features permanent and rotating exhibits exploring topics such as Cosmic Light and Nanotechnology. They also offer planetarium and IMAX shows. For those who prefer art, the Boston Museum of Fine Arts has collections ranging from ancient Egypt to modern American, as well as everything in between. If neither of those options interests you, there are a multitude of other museums including the Boston Fire Museum, John F. Kennedy Presidential Museum and the USS Constitution Museum.

Boston


Transportation

MBTA

The Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority is an extremely popular form of transportation within the city of Boston. This system includes the subway, train, and bus lines. There are a number of passes that can be purchased for those who are only staying temporarily such as the 7-day Link Pass, which costs just $19 USD and includes unlimited traveling within the week.

Car Rentals

Cars can be rented near the airport from different companies such as Alamo, Avis, Budget, Dollar, Enterprise, and Hertz. Some of these companies also offer a pick-up service where they come pick you up and take you to the renting location to get your rental car. There are also other website such as Expedia, Kayak, and Vroom that offer cheaper options from the same companies, so be sure to visit those if you choose to rent a car!

Rental Car Company

Telephone Number

Alamo Car Rental

(888) 826-6893

Avis Car Rental

(617) 568-6602

Budget Rental Car

(617) 568-6601

Dollar Rent A Car

(866) 434-2226

Enterprise Rent A Car

(617) 561-4488

Hertz Car Rental

(617) 568-5200

Touring/Networking

Following the first day of the conference on the evening of September 20, 2018 we would like to invite all attendees and speakers to come enjoy an enjoyable networking opportunity with us! The event will take place at JM Conference Center at Harvard Medical School from 5:30-7:30 p.m. and include dinner, and networking. Please contact ffc@functionalfoodcenter.com if you are interested in purchasing a ticket for this event.