Functional Food Center

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20th International Conference of FFC - 8th International Symposium of ASFFBC

Functional and Medical Foods for Chronic Diseases:
Bioactive Compounds and Biomarkers
September 22-23, 2016, The Joseph B. Martin Conference Center at Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA

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Functional Food Center is pleased to announce its 20th International Conference "Functional and Medical Foods for Chronic Diseases: Bioactive Compounds and Biomarkers".The conference will be held in Joseph B. Martin Conference Center at Harvard Medical School Boston, USA on September 22-23, 2016. This conference will bring together experts in medicine, biology, and the food industry to discuss the functional foods with bioactive compounds as dietary interventions for chronic diseases.

Main Conference Topics/Sessions

Session: Functional Food Definition and the Status of Functional Foods in Japan, China, USA and other Countries

Session: Health Claims: Nutraceutical, Functional and Medical Food Regulations

Session: Functional Foods with Bioactive Compound(s): Prevention and Management of Non-communicable Diseases

Session: Safety of the Bioactive Compounds and Functional Foods

Session: Current Research and Development of New Functional Food Products.

For more details about the Sessions and main conference topics please visit Conference Topics page.

Call for Abstracts:

The abstract submission deadline is May 31, 2016. The entire abstract should have a maximum of 1,000 words, up to three pages (including references). There is no up-front fee for submitting a conference abstract. Once the abstract is generally accepted for the conference, the corresponding/first author is responsible to pay the abstract publication fee of $49 within 10 days. Failure to pay the abstract publication fee within 10 days after abstract acceptance day will result in a late abstract publication fee of $99. First authors are expected to register, pay the conference and abstract fee, and present the paper (if submission is accepted). In the case of an emergency and the author(s) are unable to attend the conference, they are required to pay an abstract publication fee of $99. Decisions on selection will be promptly communicated to the authors via e-mail. All contributions will be reviewed, and accepted abstracts will be published in the conference proceedings book. Please email your abstract as an attachment to ffc@functionalfoodcenter.com. Please review our sample abstract.

There is no charge for the withdrawal of an abstract before May 31, 2016. In the case that the first author cannot attend the conference and present, he or she must contact the conference organizing committee via e-mail at ffc@functionalfoodcenter.com, to provide notification of withdrawal or to request a substitute presenter. Withdrawals must be received before May 31, 2016.

Please note: Abstracts withdrawn after May 31, 2016, will be published and the first author will be expected to pay the abstract publication fee. The conference does not provide financial support nor registration fee waivers for any presentations.

To avoid the last-minute rush, submit your abstract in advance. Abstracts received by the Conference Organizing Committee after May 31, 2016 at 5 pm will not be accepted. For any information concerning publications please contact us at ffc@functionalfoodcenter.com For more information about abstract submission,click here.


Instructions for Poster Presenters:

Poster presentations allow the audience to get a clear visual of the presenters' work in a simple format. The reasonable size for posters is 2.5 - 3.0 feet high by 3.5 - 4 feet wide.

Poster Presentation Recommendations:

  1. The poster should clearly present the title, the author(s), affiliation(s), and a description of the research, along with highlighting the abstract's major elements.
  2. Remember that pictures, tables, and figures are key to any poster display.
  3. At least 50% of the surface area should be used for photos, graphs, or diagrams.
  4. Good use of color and the use of black or dark blue for text. Too much color can be hard to read!
  5. One or two large high-quality photographs attract attention.
  6. Make the title large and clear! Include author(s) name(s) and address(es). Your poster title should be easily readable from 3 - 4 meters away.
  7. We recommend the following sections on the poster: Abstract, Introduction, Methods, Tables, Figures, Results, and Conclusions.

For more information about poster sessions, please click here.

Registration Fees:

The registration fee will cover the Conference Proceedings book (Abstract book) and lunches and refreshments for two days. It will also cover a 12 month membership to the Academic Society for Functional Foods and Bioactive Compounds. Each registration allows the registrant to present up to 3 accepted abstracts maximum.

Cancellation Policy: Before February 22, 2106: 75% refund; before May 30, 2016: 50% refund; after May 30, 2016: No refund. Reimbursements will be sent after the conference. Notice of cancellation of registration must be received in writing to the Conference Secretariat, at:  ffc_usa@sbcglobal.net. All refunds will be provided after the conference within 14 days.

You may click here to make a payment for the conference registration fee.

Conference registration fees are in USD (Early Bird Registration by February 22, 2016)

  Discounted Rate
(Until May 30, 2016)
Standard Rate
(Until August 30, 2016)
Full-Time Students* 345.00 395.00
Dietitians and Retired Professionals* N/A 445.00
USDA, NIH, FDA 495.00 545.00
Academic 645.00 695.00
Commercial (Food and Medical Industry) 795.00 845.00
Exhibitor/Vendor 1195.00 1295.00
Abstract Publication Fee 49.00 99.00

* Must present ID

Please note: space at this conference is limited and will be allocated on a first come, first served basis.

Students enrolled in an undergraduate program (MS, PhD or MD) are eligible for the Student Discount rate. When you register for the conference, you must enter your mentor's name and Email address during checkout to verify your student status.

Ticket

Paper Submission:

Abstract submission deadline: May 31, 2016. Full-text papers for oral presentations or posters should be submitted before May 31, 2016. Power Points for oral presentations should be submitted before September 8, 2016. Please send all documents to ffc_usa@sbcglobal.net.

  • Please note that the program and sessions are subject to change

Disclaimer: Functional Food Center, Inc, is not affiliated with Harvard University, nor is Functional Food Center, Inc, a Harvard University program or activity

For more information about the conference, please contact us by e-mail at ffc_usa@sbcglobal.net.   For international calls, please use: 469-441-8272, Toll free: 1-866-202-0487


Sample Abstract

Diacylglycerol for obesity: serotonin hypothesis

Hidekatsu Yanai1, Hiroshi Yoshida2, 3, Yuji Hirowatari4, and Norio Tada3

1Department of Internal Medicine, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Kohnodai Hospital, Chiba, 21567-0345, Japan;2Department of Laboratory Medicine, Jikei University School of Medicine, Chiba, 31567-0345, Japan; 3Internal Medicine of Metabolism and Nutrition, Jikei University Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba, 41567-0345, Japan; 4Bioscience Division, TOSOH Corp, Kanagawa, 51567-0345, Japan

Keywords: diacylglycerol, intestine, obesity, serotonin, thermogenesis

Background: Diacylglycerol (DAG) oil is a natural component of various edible oils. DAG has been reported to prevent obesity through a variety of potential mechanisms in comparison with triacylglycerol (TAG) in humans. An increase in postprandial energy expenditure (EE) is proposed to be one of the mechanisms underlying this effect of DAG. Up-regulated mRNA expressions associated with EE by DAG in the small intestine may explain increased postprandial EE. The small intestine seems to contribute to changes in EE by DAG. We previously studied plasma serotonin, which is mostly present in the small intestine and mediates sympathetic thermogenesis. We found that DAG ingestion increases plasma serotonin levels by approximately 50% compared to TAG ingestion.

Objective: To understand the molecular mechanisms for DAG-induced increase in serotonin and EE, we investigated effects of DAG on serotonin release and expressions of genes associated with EE, using the human intestinal cell line.

Methods: The intestinal cell line, the Caco-2 cells, was incubated with medium containing 1-monoacylglycerol (1-monooleyglycerol [1-MOG]) and 2-monoacylglycerol (2-monooleylglycerol [2-MOG]), distinctive digestive products of DAG and TAG, respectively. We measured serotonin release from the Caco-2 cells using a newly developed high-performance liquid chromatography. Further, we studied effects of 1-MOG, 2-MOG, and serotonin on expressions of mRNA associated with EE (acyl-CoA oxidase [ACO], medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase [MCAD], fatty acid translocase [FAT], and uncoupling protein-2 [UCP-2]), by the Real-Time quantitative RT-PCR system.

Results: 100 mM 1-MOG significantly increased serotonin release from the Caco-2 cells compared with the same concentration of 2-MOG by approximately 37% (P<0.001). Expressions of mRNA of ACO, FAT, and UCP-2 were significantly higher in 100 mM 1-MOG-treated Caco-2 cells than 100 mM 2-MOG-treaed cells by approximately 13%, 24%, and 35%, respectively. Expressions of mRNA of ACO, MCAD, FAT, and UCP-2 were significantly increased in 400 nM serotonin-treated Caco-2 cells as compared with the Caco-2 cells incubated without serotonin by approximately 29%, 30%, and 39%, respectively.

Conclusion: ;Our study demonstrated that a hydrolytic product of DAG increases serotonin release from the intestinal cells and enhances expressions of genes associated with b-oxidation (ACO, MCAD), thermogenesis (UCP-2) and fatty acids metabolism (FAT). Furthermore, this study revealed that serotonin also enhances expression of these genes, proposing a new molecular biological mechanism for DAG-mediated anti-obesity effect. Serotonin may play an important role in DAG-mediated prevention of obesity.

(Please note: the portion below is required for our records, but will not appear in the published abstract)

International Conference

Corresponding Author:Hidekatsu Yanai, PhD, Professor, Department of Internal Medicine, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Kohnodai Hospital, Chiba, 01567-0345, Japan, e-mail hy@gmal.com, phone number: (001) 469-441-8272, secondary phone: (866) 464-6955

Main Presenting Author:Hidekatsu Yanai, PhD, Professor, Department of Internal Medicine, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Kohnodai Hospital, Chiba, 01567-0345, Japan, e-mail: hy@gmal.com, phone number: (001) 469-441-8272, secondary phone: (866) 464-6955

Co-authors:

Hiroshi Yoshida, MD, PhD, e-mail: hyoshida@gmal.com

Yuji Hirowatari, PhD, e-mail: yhir@gmal.com

mtada@gmal.com

Presentation Type (please choose one): ;Oral or poster

Main Conference Topics (please choose one): Choose one from the conference website


Abstract Submission

The abstract submission deadline May 31, 2016. The entire abstract should have a maximum of 1000 words. Please use Times New Roman Font 12 for the entire abstract.

The first author of the research is considered the primary author and must present. One person may be the primary author for a maximum of 2 abstracts. However, only one abstract may be presented as an oral presentation with the other presented as a poster, or both abstracts may be presented as posters.

1. All abstract submissions must include research-based data to allow for a thorough review.

2. Abstracts must contain the following:

  • Author(s) – do not include degree acronyms (i.e., BS, MS, PhD, etc.)
  • Body of the abstract
  • Keywords
  • Background
  • Methods
  • Results
  • Conclusions
4. Abstracts cannot contain the following:
  • Brand names
  • Advertisements. Research abstracts should be free from solicitations and should not contain demonstrations of products for the purpose of sales. Exhibitor’s tables are available for the purpose of advertisement and sales

Abstracts can contain either one picture, one graph, or one table (no combinations)

  • A graph or table must be embedded into the abstract and cannot exceed 1/3 of the page
  • Any graph or table must pertain to the abstract for the purpose of visualizing data and must be referred to in the text of the abstract
  • Pictures, tables and graphs should be no bigger than 4 1/2 in. (W) x 4 1/2 in. (L)
  • Keep in mind that all images will be displayed in black and white
  • Corresponding author(s)
  • Primary/Presenting author's name
  • Primary author's professional mailing address, e-mail address, and phone number
  • Desired presentation format (oral, poster, etc.)
  • Session name
  • Co-authors' e-mail addresses

Please note: the portion of abstract is required for our records, but will not appear in the published
abstract and accordingly will not included in worrd count.

Please note: article submission to Journal of Functional Foods in Health and Disease is mandatory for the oral presenters.


Accepted Abstracts

  1. Sulforaphane ameliorates memory deficits in a triple-transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease: its effects on brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression.Kim Jiy., Kim Jis., Lee S, Choi B, Han J and Lee K.
  2. Investigation of bioactivities of B. alba and Solanecio biafrae extracts.Bosede B

  3. The renoprotective effects of rosuvastatin in streptozotocin-induced diabetes in rats via lipid lowering action, pleiotropic effects, attenuation of oxidative stress and down regulation of advanced glycation end products expression Hagar H, Otabi N, Bakheet D, and Muhammed R

  4. Comparing the Effect of Memantine on Metabolism, Oxidative Stress and Antioxidant Reserve in Patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment with and without Type 2 Diabetes; an Experimental Clinical Trial. Larry M, Mirmiranpour H, Esteghamati A, and Nakhjavani M

  5. Orange peels modulate the redox status and inhibit matrix metalloproteinase activities in primary (Caco-2) and metastatic (LoVo and LoVo/ADR) colon cancer cells. Ayokunle O. Ademosun A, Oboh G, Passamonti S, Tramer F, Ziberna L, Boligonc A, and Athaydec M

  6. Assessment of curcumin effect on antioxidants in type 2 diabetic patients. Mirmiranpour H, Lari M, Nakhjavani M, Esteghamati A

  7. Acute resveratrol consumption improves cerebrovascular responsiveness during a working memory task in adults with type 2 diabetes. Wong R, Nealon R, and Howe P

  8. Antioxidative, anticholinesterase and antimonoaminergic properties of alkaloid extracts from Cola species. Oboh G, Ademosun A, Ogunsuyi O, Olasehinde T, and Oyeleye S

  9. An antioxidant diet improves Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor levels in serum of aged dogs: preliminary results. Cerbo A, Sechi S, Gadau S, and Cocco R

  10. Cdh1 regulates tumorigenesis and craniofacial development via the WWP2/Goosecoid signaling axis: Possible target for anticancer functional foods and bioactive compounds. Liu J, Shao R, Wan S, Liu J, Yan G, Zhang J, Han Y, Dai X, Guo J, Xu Z, Liu J, Malumbres M, Zou W, and Wei W

  11. Dehydrated melon containing antioxidants from grape juice. Chambi H and Schmidt F

  12. Study on functional properties and antioxidant activity of jackfruit seed and soy seed flour blends before and after extrusion. Priyadarshini C, Bhattacharyya D, Bandyopadhyay N, Ghosh M

  13. Hypolipidemic effect of Diacylglycerol rich oil based Sesame spreads with bioactive constituents. Kar S, Ghosh M, Bhattacharyya D, Ghosh M

  14. Biochemical effect of edible wild mushrooms in Thailand on anti-lipase and anti-alpha-glucosidase activities. Pongkunakorn T and Suttisansanee U

  15. A dietary portfolio modulates SIRT1 expression in astrocytes and reduces brain inflammation while improving working memory in a transgenic mice model of Alzheimer disease. Begum S, Pinedo A, Díaz-Cintra S, Torres-Torres N, Perez-Cruz C

  16. Impact of flaxseeds intervention as key for managing dyslipidemia in geriatric patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment. Agarwal A, Chauhan K, Mishra S

  17. A novel phyto-oxylipin CX confers acute and systemic anti-inflammatory effect in the liver and small intestine. Stefanson A and Bakovic M

  18. Peels from south Indian fruits acts as a source for antioxidants and fiber by Actinomycetes pectinases. Suneetha V and Kris A

  19. Comparative effects of antioxidant nutraceuticals and functional foods on cellular immunity of apparently healthy volunteers. Nweze C

  20. Colonic delivery of nutrients for management of blood glucose in type 2 diabetes patients. Szewczyk J, Nolan R, Giannone J, Marcuard S, and Kindel T

  21. Hydroxytyrosol for Alzheimer’s disease: improving brain function independent of Aβ processing. Peng Y, Liu J, Tang Y, Long J, and Liu J

  22. Mitochondrial nutrients for preventing skeletal muscle atrophy. Liu J, Peng Y, Wang X, Fan Y, Qin C, Shi L, Tang Y, Li H, Feng Z, Qu L, Li Y, Long J, Liu J

  23. Isothiocyanates from the edible plant nasturtium and the prevention of type 2 diabetes: Reduction in glucose production and modulation of protective pathways. Guzmán-Pérez V, Bumke-Vogt C, Schreiner M, Mewis I, Borchert A, Pfeiffer A

  24. Drought stress affects organic and inorganic bioactive compounds in potatoes relevant to non-communicable diseases (NCD). Wegener C, Jürgens H, and Jansen G

  25. Impact of casein non-phosphopeptides on sarcopenia using CT scanning technology. Zhang N, Shi Y G, Guo Q Q, and Guo C H

  26. Risk factors for diabetic foot syndrome among patients attending a secondary health facility in Lagos, Nigeria- a case control study. Amoran OE and Oluwatoyin S

  27. Potential benefits of probiotics consumption. Riscuta G

  28. Newbouldia laevis modulates β-cell function, improves insulin sensitivity, and attenuates atherogenic dyslipidaemia in diabetic rats. Okafor J, Erukainure O, Ajiboye J, Etoamaihe M, Okafor G, and Awoniyi S

  29. Inhibition of α-amylase, α-glucosidase and Fe2+ induced lipid peroxidation by aqueous extract of some Allium species (garlic, pink onion and white onion). Oboh G, Ogunsakin B, Ademiluyi A, Agunloye M

  30. Sociological and environmental factors associated with mental health: A follow up study of patients with Geriatric Depression and Cognitive Impairment. Dillon C, Camelo J L, Heisecke S, and Taragano F

  31. The role of lutein in cognitive function: a review. Johnson E

  32. Dietary Nitrite and Nitrate: From Menace to Marvel. Bryan N

  33. Inhibition of α-Amylase, α-Glucosidase and Oxidative Stress by Some Common Apple Varieties. Oboh G, Omojokun O, Oyeleye S, and Akinyemi A

  34. HPLC-DAD profiling, antioxidant and anticholinesterase activities of methanolic extract of senecio and bitter ash leaves. Odubanjo V, Oboh G, Adefegha S, and Boligon A

  35. Effects of fermentation on the nutritional and anti-nutritional components of cooked/boiled water melon (Citrullus Lanatus) seed. Makinde O A, Adejoro D O, Odubanjo V, and Ajayi A S

  36. Distribution of polyphenols in some species of african eggplant fruits (Solanum spp) inhibits α-amylase, α-glucosidase and angiotensin-1-converting enzyme activities in-vitro. Nwanna E, Ibukun E, and Oboh G

  37. Structural poses of novel anti-diabetes compounds targeting α-glucosidase. Shodehinde S, Ejelonu O, Odubanjo V, Elekofehinti O, and Omotuyi O

  38. Charnoly body as a novel biomarker of nutritional stress in alzheimer’s disease. Sharma S, Choga J, Gupta V, Doghor P, Chauhan A, Kalala F, Foor A, Wright C, Renteria J, Elliott-Theberge K, and Mathur S

  39. Inhibitory effect of citrus peel on colon carcinogenesis with suppression of oxidative stress. Wakabayashi K, Tomono S, and Mutoh M

  40. Neuroprotective effect of saponins from Solanum anguivi fruits on rats brain synaptosome challenged with Fe2+ and SNP. Kamdem J P, Elekofehinti O O, Kade I J, Adanlawo I G, and Rocha J B T

  41. Effect of kefir on Fusobacterium nucleatum potentially causing intestinal cancer. Guzel-Seydim Z, Dibekci M, Cagdas E, and Seydim A

  42. Phenolic-rich extracts from Capsicum chinense suppresses peroxide induced oxidase stress in neuronal SH-SY5Y cells. Ogunruku O, Oboh G, Passamonti S, and Tramer F

  43. The immuno-modulatory and anti-proliferative activity of high molecular weight and modified citrus pectin. Al-Merheb R, Hawach V, Karam M, and Abdel-Massih RM

  44. Gamisoyosan, a traditional herbal medicine, down-regulates Th2 cytokine in ConA-stimulated Balb/C mouse splenocyte. Kim W and Kim J

  45. Alkaloid extracts from Jimson Weed (Datura stromonium L) altered purinergic and cholinergic enzymes in rat brain. Ademiluyi A, Ogunsuyi O, and Oboh G

  46. Biological activities of phenolic extracts from Clerodendrum volubile leaves relevant to the management of Alzheimer Disease. Oboh G, Ogunruku OO, Oyeleye SI, Olasehinde TA, Ademosun AO, Boligon AA

  47. Key enzyme inhibitory properties related to some non-communicable diseases from defatted rice bran protein isolate and protein hydrolysates. Yotpinta N, Tungsuphoom N, On-nom N, Sahasakul Y, Hudthagosol C, Somboonpanyakul P, Sapwarobol S, and Suttisansanee U

  48. Generating high fibre and high resistant starch barley grain for improving health indices for diabetes and bowel health. Li Z, Wang H, Huang M, Konik-Rose C

  49. Health benefit, food safety and product development of local plants at conserved area of Plant Genetic Conservation Project under the Royal Initiative of Her Royal Highness Princess Maha Chakri Sirindhorn, Kanchanaburi Province, Thailand. Suttisansanee U, Srichamnong W, On-nom N, Thiyajai P, Chamchan R, Judprasong K, and Charoenkiatkul S

  50. Safety and Efficacy of a Novel Fenugreek Seed (Trigonella foenum-graecum, FenfuroTM) Extract in Patients with Type-2 Diabetes. Swaroop A, Bagchi M, Kumar P, Preuss HG, and Bagchi D

  51. Efficacy of Furosap, a novel Trigonella foenum-graecum seed extract, in Enhancing Testosterone Level and Improving Sperm Profile in Male Volunteers. Bagchi D, Swaroop A, Bagchi M, Kumar P, and Preuss H G

  52. Nutraceutical Regulations in the United States with a Special Emphasis on GRAS (Generally Recognized as Safe) Status and Label Claims. Bagchi D

  53. Nutraceutical Regulations in the Southeast Asian Subcontinent. Deshmukh N

  54. Industrial defatted rice bran powder: a potent therapeutic agent for the prevention and treatment of certain chronic diseases. K Suwapat, Hudthagosol C, Somboonpanyakul P, Sapwarobol S, and Suttisansanee U

  55. Coffee silverskin extract for diabetes. Del Castillo M D, Fernández-Gomez B, Martín M A and Mesa M D

  56. Pharmacokinetic of 3H-deacetylasperulosidic acid in mice. Westendorf J, Basar-Maurer S, Hackl T, and Schwedhelm E

  57. General lack of correlations between age and signs of metabolic syndrome in subjects with non-diabetic fasting glucose levels. Preuss H G, Mrvichin N, Clouatre D, Bagchi D, Preuss J M, Perricone N V, and Kaats G R

  58. Functional food factors for prevention of dementia. Nishino H

  59. Quantification of some phenolic compounds in Hygrophila spinosa T. Anders by a novel high performance thin layer chromatography. Patra A, Satpathy S, Singh S K, Hussain M D

  60. In vitro investigation on prebiotic properties of orange fleshed sweet potato puree and its implications to human gut health. Muchiri M, Charalampopoulos D, and McCartney A

  61. Enzymatic synthesis of glycosides, their functional characterization, and potential uses. Kim D, Nguyen T H, Kim J, Ha J, Lee D, and Si J

  62. The natural probiotic mine: kefir grains. Guzel-Seydim Z B, Atilgan S, Tas T K, Seydim A C

  63. Antioxidant and cytotoxicity activities of crude extracts and compounds from leaves and stem bark of ficus burtt-davyi. Ogunlaja O O, Moodley R, Baijnath H, Singh M, and Jonnalagadda S

  64. Nutritional evaluation, bioaccumulation and toxicological assessment of heavy metals in edible fruits of Ficus sur Forssk. (Moraceae). Ogunlaja O O, Moodley R, Baijnath H, and Jonnalagadda S

  65. Effects of L. paracasei subp. paracasei X12 on cell cycle of colon cancer HT-29 cells and regulation of mTOR signaling pathway. Huang L, Li K, Lei P, Liu X, and Shan Y

  66. Oleacein – a new approach to the prevention of human carotid plaque destabilization. Filipek A, Czerwinska M, Kiss A, Polanski J, and Naruszewicz M

  67. Histopathological assessment of the cardioprotective influence of Caulerpa lentillifera crude lipid extract against the development of isoproterenol-induced myocardial injury in a murine model. Simbulan R J B, Calderon P E E, Layug R A, Al-os A B P, Go J R J, Goco M E C, Javar K T M, Labiano D F, Parde D K S, Perez A G A, Rodriguez I J Y, Santos III A F, Sergio N L, Sincioco J E M, and Tiangco M A P

  68. Effect of resveratrol on endothelial cells incubated with plasma from preeclampsia women (in vitro model). Sandrim V C, Dias-Caldeira M, Possonato-Vieira J S, and Cavalli R

  69. Exploiting Host Innate Immune Defense for Pre-symptomatic Diagnosis and Therapy of Infectious Disease. Nguyen H, Basu S, Pardington P E, Wren M S, Hao G, Stover E, Lee D, and Gupta G

  70. Interactions of Food and Beverages with Commonly Used Prescription Medications. Wicks S, Kane G, Lawal T, and Mahady G

  71. What is the role of inorganic nitrate and nitrite in cardiovascular disease: A Systematic Review of Human Evidence. Jackson J, MacDonald-Wicks L, Patterson A, and McEvoy M
  72. Protective effects of Sulforaphane on human bladder cancer both in vivo and in vitro. Shan Y, Huang L, Lei P, Liu X
  73. Phytochemical and bioactive properties of ginger-flavoured composite biscuit from composite flour of wheat, bambara groundnut and plantain. Oluwamukomi MO and Arogundade TJ
  74. Body mass, metabolic and cardiovascular impact of aquatic exercise and nutritional guidance for individuals with chronic incomplete spinal cord injury (CMISCI). Scott W, Smith J, James K, Gorman P, and Geigle P R
  75. Improvement of abnormal fat metabolism by sulforaphane through the endoplasmic reticulum stress in hepatocytes. Tian S and Shan Y
  76. Angiotensin I converting enzyme inhibitory properties of enzymatic yak milk casein hydrolysates. Lin K, Zhang L, Han X, Yi H, and Cheng D
  77. Polymannuronic acid of brown seaweed prevent obesity in high-fat diet mice due to its effects on gut microbiota. Tang Q, Liu F, and Xue C
  78. Plant sterol-enriched soy milk consumption alleviates 5-lipoxygenase and myeloperoxidase activities in healthy adults. Loke W M, Ho X L, Liu J J H
  79. Bovine Lactoferrin promote the proliferation of osteoblast to prevent osteoporosis. Zhang J, Zhang L, Han X, and Yi H
  80. The efficacy of Japanese traditional herbal medicine for elderly patients, on nocturia due to night-time awakening. Matsuo T, Nakamura Y, Yasuda T, Asai A, Ohba K, Miyata Y, and Sakai H
  81. Bacterial diversity and technological, functional and safety characterization of Non-starter lactic acid bacteria strains in goat cheeses. Meng Z, Zhang L, Han X, and Yi H
  82. Water Buffalo Mozzarella cheese as a source of potential probiotic lactic acid bacteria for application in functional food. Nascimento L C S, Casarotti S N, Silva L F, and Penna A L B
  83. Selection of Lactobacillus spp. strains for the development of innovative probiotic functional fermented products. de Souza B M S, Silva L F, Casarotti S N, and Penna A L B
  84. Apple peel flavonoids AF4 inhibit triple negative breast cancer cell proliferation and migration. Fernando W, Rupasinghe H P V, and Hoskin D
  85. Lactobacillus gasseri SBT2055 stimulates immunoglobulin production and innate immunity after influenza vaccination in healthy adult volunteers: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study. Nishihira J, Moriya T, Sakai F, Kabuki T, Kawasaki Y, and Nishimura M
  86. Transcription Factor EB is a crucial transducer of the biomedical action of Pterostilbene. La Spina M, Azzolini M, Mattarei A, Di Benedetto G, Paradisi C, Zoratti M, and Biasutto L
  87. Medical Foods: An Essential Therapeutic Category in Search of Definition and FDA Clarification in the United States. Burnett B
  88. The psychrotrophic bacteria diversity from raw milk of North China and their proteolytic property. Xin L, Zhang L, Cui Y, Yi H, and Han X
  89. Single chain antibodies against advanced glycation endproducts evaluated with synthetically modified peptides and proteins. Wendel U, Danielsson L, Persson N, Risinger C, Welinder C, Jansson, B and Blixt O
  90. Xylitol production from waste xylose mother liquor containing miscellaneous sugars and inhibitors: one-pot biotransformation by Candida tropicalis and recombinant Bacillus subtilis. Wang H, Cheng H, and Deng Z
  91. The effects of functional food on rehabilitation of coronary hearts disease patients. Plakida A, Usenko E, and Zhuravl'ova T
  92. Puerarin and isoflavones from kudzu root (Pueraria lobata Ohwi) prevent acute drunkenness and relieve alcoholism in mice. Lin H and Zhou D
  93. Study on the immune function of the mice with the Schisandra Chinensis fermented wine. Lyu L and Zhang L
  94. Effect of a probiotic fermented soy product and sulfassalazine in DSS-induced colitis. Cavallini D C U, Celiberto L S, Rossi E A, Bedani R, Zuanon J A S, Spolidorio L C, Adorno M A T, Silva M B A V, De Valdez G F, Galvão F C, and Valentini S R
  95. Effects of lycopene diet supplementation on cholesterol oxidation products and hemoglobin values in aged persons with chronic kidney disease and anemia. Carluccio F, Lenucci M, Piro G, Siems W, and Luño J
  96. Protective influence of virgin coconut Cocos nucifera oil supplementation against the development of N-methyl-N-nitrosourea-induced mammary neoplasia in a murine model. Mann M L C, Calderon P E E, Domingo J F, Torralba C M C, Banal V M F V, Lastrilla H S A, Cavaneyro M L, Valenciano A C, Vicente J C D, Villano K B, Lintag E I B S, Aguinaldo A C M, Manalastas K N M, Labriaga K M, Miranda R F P, and Calderon E J E
  97. Antioxidant coffee dietary fiber for gastrointestinal health and diabetes. Vázquez-Sánchez K, Martinez-Saez N, del Castillo M D, and Campos-Vega R
  98. Anserine dipeptide from fish extracts ameliorate the uric acid levels in fructose-induced HK2 cells and hyperuricemic patients. Tseng W, Lee K, Chen M, and Chang W T H
  99. Assessment of serum adiponectin, leptin and specific IgE levels in children with food allergy. Sirjani M, Shoormasti R S, Ayazi M, Tayebi B, Namini N K, Sabetkish N, and Pourpak Z
  100. Garlic-Derived S-Allylmercaptocysteine ameliorates the obesity induced bone loss. Zhang L, Tipoe G L, and Lu W W
  101. Neuroprotective effects of phytoestrogens derived from Flemingia strobilifera via enhancing neuroglobin expression. Jeong S, Chang M, Choi S, Oh S, Yu Z, Wang X, and Song Y S
  102. The effect of kefir produced from the natural kefir grains on the intestinal microorganisms of the BALB/c mice. Erdogan F S, Kurtulmus S, Tas T K, and Seydim Z B G
  103. FDA Health Claims for Foods and Dietary Supplements. Trumbo P
  104. Effects of Grape Wine and Apple Cider Vinegar on Oxidative and Antioxidative Status in High Cholesterol-Fed Rats. Seydim A C, Güzel-Seydim Z B, Doguc D K, Savas M C, and Budak H N
  105. Green tea polyphenol induces changes in cancer-related factors in an animal model of bladder cancer. Asai A, Miyata Y, Matsuo T, Ohba K, Sagara Y, Furusato B, Fukuoka J, and Sakai H
  106. The elucidation of the mechanism of lentinan-induced inflammatory suppression by visualizing TNFR1 on the membrane. Sakaguchi K, Hashimoto T, Itoh T, Shirai Y, and Mizuno M
  107. Antibacterial activity of Ilex paraguariensis (Yerba Mate) against gram positive and gram negative bacteria. Noureddine T, Husseini Z E, Nehma A, Daoud Z, and Abdel-Massih R
  108. What’s in your dietary fiber supplement? Using the dietary supplement label database (DSLD) to determine total dietary fiber levels for use in oncology community health care. Emenaker N, Sorkin B, Dwyer J, and Rodriguez L
  109. “Autoprobiotic” therapy ameliorates DSS-induced colitis on mice. Celiberto L, Rossi E A, Bedani R, Zuanon J A S, Spolidorio L C, Valdez G F D, and Cavallini D C U
  110. Blackberry juice’s protective effect in rats under a hypercaloric diet. Perez-Grijalva B, Mora-Escobedo R, Guzman-Geronimo R I, and Perez-Cruz C
  111. Lipid profiles of two species of the fishes red Tilapia (Oreochromis sp.) and Cachama (Piaractus brachypomus): A comparative study between commercially-available and recirculation systems-cultured individuals. Rozo J, Barbosa R, Buitrago I, Torres A, Hurtado H, Gómez E, and Coy-Barrera E
  112. The profile of polyphenols and antioxidant capacity of selected medicinal plants of Bangladesh. Shaheen N, Tukun A B, Islam S, Irfan N M, Khan I N, and Longvah T
  113. Evaluation of functional potentiality of selected commonly consumed foods of Bangladesh. Shaheen N, Tukun A B, Islam S, Irfan N M, Khan I N, and Hasan T
  114. Effect of different concentrations of proteins in a soluble high fiber food on the short-term satiety in healthy young adults. Palma X E, Oliveri M A, and Araya H
  115. Health conscientiousness of gluten and diet-related food choices of students at Southern Adventist University. Mawuntu M
  116. Metabolite profiling of two functional foods, rugula (Eruca sativa) and watercress (Nasturtium officinale), growing in hydroponic system. Rozo J, Barbosa R, Buitrago I, Torres A, Hurtado H, Gómez E, and Coy-Barrera E
  117. Possibility of epigallocatechin gallate and a-tocopherol as functional food for diabetic nephropathy and their molecular mechanism. Hayashi D, Yagi K, Ueda S, Yamnoue M, Ashida H, Emoto N, Saito N and Shirai Y
  118. Coffee silverskin extract protects against benzo (a) pyrene induced DNA damage. Iriondo-DeHond A, Haza A, Ávalos A, del Castillo M D and Morales P
  119. Health Claims on Food Packaging – little apparent need from South Australian adults. Riley M, Bowen J, Krause D, Jones D, and Stonehouse W
  120. A combination of herbal extracts increases LKB1-dependent activation of AMPK, a result not shared by CaMKK2. Whelan J, Donohoe D, Zhao Y, Huang E, and MacDonald A
  121. Arabinoxylan Extracts for Immunity: Modulation Pathway. Li W, Zhang Z, Smith C, and Ashworth J
  122. Clinical Efficacy of a Novel Green Coffee Bean Extract (GCB-70) in Overweight Subjects. Bagchi M, Verma N, Mittal M, Swaroop A, Bagchi D, Kumar P, and Preuss H G
  123. Vitamin B12 supplementation and cognitive scores in geriatric patients having mild cognitive impairment. Chauhan K and Agarwal A
  124. Beta-cryptoxanthin (BCX) improves lung function and reduces stress induced inflammation: In vivo model. Juturu V, Sahin K, Pala R, Tuzcu M, Sahin N and Ozdemir O
  125. Lutein and Zeaxanthin isomers protect photoreceptors against blue light-induced degeneration. Yu M and Beight C
  126. A 2-year follow up study with fermented papaya preparation (FPP) modulating novel risk markers of cardiovascular and neurodegenerative disease in middle-age subjects with impending metabolic syndrome. Marotta F, Marcellino M, Solimene U, Cuffari B, Lorenzetti A, Mantello A, Cabeca A, Karaushu O, Cervi J, and Catanzaro R
  127. Topical applied nutraceutical antioxidant formulation reduces ocular oxidative stress. Kador PF, Guo C, Kawada H, Randazzo J, and Blessing K
  128. Oral administration of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCg) improved diabetic nephropathy in mice. Hayashi D, Ueda S, Yamanoue M, Ashida H, and Shirai Y
  129. Discovery and impact of zinc on human health: Bio-markers of zinc deficiency. Prasad A
  130. Traced tuscan food for breast-cancer surgery-treated patients under chemotherapy: a program for a clinical trial at the breast center of Pisa-Italy university hospital. Bargiacchi E, Romani A, Pinelli P, Roncella M, Michelotti A, Montagnani I, and Miele S
  131. The beneficial effects of berry fruit on cognitive and neuronal function in aging. Shukitt-Hale B, Miller MG, Thangthaeng N, Fisher DR, Bielinski DF, Kelly ME, and Scott TM
  132. Long Chain Omega-3 Fatty Acids, Cognitive Aging, and Dementia. Scott TM
  133. Linkage of Diet and Inflammation: Measuring C-reactive Protein in Experimental Mice Given Variable Diets. Fahmy G, Lynch E, and Mathews A
  134. Consumption of fruit and vegetables in relation to cognitive function in aging populations. Grodstein F
  135. Integrated Medicine with vegetable derived antioxidant and vitamin D: effects on oxidative stress and bone mineral metabolism of aged patients with renal disease. Carluccio F, Lenucci M, Piro G, Siems W, and Luno J

Guidelines for Full Paper Submission

Participants with accepted abstracts may write full articles:

  1. The entire text of the full papers must be in Times New Roman, 12 point size font.
  2. Full paper margins should be 0.75 inches from the top and bottom, and 1.0 inch from the left and right for A4 format paper.
  3. Line spacing should be 1.15 and alignment justified.
  4. The submitted full papers should contain 6-16 pages. A shorter or longer manuscript must be discussed with the organizing committee.
  5. When submitting a full paper, the corresponding author should send a cover letter indicating that the authors have not submitted a similar manuscript for publication elsewhere. Full papers submitted without cover letters will not be published.
  6. The full papers and cover letter should be submitted as separate attachments to the following email address: ffc_usa@sbcglobal.net.
  7. Submit the full paper within 2 months following the date in the abstract acceptance letter, but no later than the date mentioned on the conference website.
  8. Full papers will be published in FFC’s Journal of Functional Foods in Health and Disease. Please download and use the suggested samples for an original scientific paper, review paper, and cover letter.
  9. As a token of our appreciation for article submissions in the Special Issue, we are offering 50% discount of our standard publication fee. If sufficient scientific funds are unavailable for coverage of the discounted publication fee, ASFFBC is willing to accommodate as needed. Please contact us for more details, if necessary. Don't miss your chance to be a part of this!
  10. Full-text papers should be submitted before May 31, 2016 and it is mandatory for oral presenters.

Conference Committee Member Roles and Responsibilities

The Functional Foods Center (FFC) holds major international conferences every year. Scientists, researchers and food industry professionals can present their latest research and discoveries about functional foods and bioactive compounds for the management of chronic diseases such as diabetes, CVD, obesity and cancer.

Involvement with our conferences is the best way to connect with other members, build relationships, showcase your talents and acquire new skills. Above all, you will help the FFC achieve its mission:

  • To increase global awareness of functional foods and their ability to improve overall health and wellness
  • To inspire cross-discipline collaborations and educate a diverse professional population including scientists, medical doctors, dietitians and other food industry professionals. In addition, to help them direct their research towards the development of a wide variety of alternative practical applications (such as functional and medical food products), where it can have the most impact to improve health and save lives.
  • To create a strong network of support among an internationally diverse spectrum of health professionals attracted to membership in our organization

Much of the success of the conference rests on the efficient and consistent execution by our Conference Committee Members and we thank you for agreeing to assume such high responsibility.

We include general information about roles and responsibilities below. Additional duties, specific to each conference, will be delegated by the Conference Chair.

If you have any questions or concerns, please contact us at: ffc_usa@sbcglobal.net.

Conference Chair

The Conference Chair is responsible for overseeing and ensuring the execution of all aspects relating to the conference. Although a great responsibility, the Conference Chair role is highly respected, and a valuable service to the research community. The Chair has different responsibilities beginning before the actual conference and ending with assisting the event. He/she selects the conference committees' members and coordinates the activities of the committees, encouraging abstract/manuscript submission, expediting reviewing processes, presiding over conference sessions, and providing a post-conference report.

Conference Chairs are expected to demonstrate the highest level of professionalism, as they are the primary source of information for the conference operations.

Scientific Program Committee

The Scientific Program Committee is responsible for planning a conference program built around a theme agreed upon by the Conference Chair.

Responsibilities include:

  • Determining conference themes and session topics
  • Assisting Conference Chairs in soliciting abstracts
  • Participating in the abstract/manuscript review processes
  • Nominating speakers/presenters to be invited
  • Minimizing subject overlap

The ideal Ccientific Program Committee includes a range of well-established and recognized experts in the field of prevention and management of chronic diseases from academia, governmental agencies, nonprofit organizations and private industries.

New committee members will replace inactive committee members as well as those who are rotating off.

Session Chair

An attentive, well-prepared Session Chair helps make certain that the speakers give high quality presentations and ensure their sessions are managed properly and remain on schedule. Session chairs will evaluate and recommend presentation proposals for their session, introduce the session topic and presenter, moderate the open discussion period at the end of the session, and fill in an open time slot with a fallback paper or open forum if a presenter cancels last minute. The Session Chair will need also need to submit a written session summary covering the main points and themes brought out in the papers and discussions, along with any subsequent questions.

Invited Oral Presenters

The Conference Chair or Program Committee will contact oral presenters and indicate whether they will be serving as a general session speaker or as a keynote speaker. For every conference, specialist speakers will be selected to present papers on themes within the scope of the conference. All efforts should be made to select renowned experts who are well-established within their fields. The Conference Chair or Program Committee will contact oral presenters and provide them with relevant details of the session topic.

Guidelines for Oral Presenters:

  • Stick to the agreed theme
  • Try to stimulate and generate discussion
  • To facilitate understanding (especially for international attendees) -speak slowly and clearly

We do not finance travel expenses for invited presenters; however, we offer discounts or waivers on the conference registration fee for keynote speakers. Waiver requests will be approved on a case by case basis.

FFC provides a high level of staff support to everyone involved in our conferences. Our staff will work closely with all members and provide guidance to ensure a successful event. Questions and concerns may be directed to our Conference Chairs, as they are the best resource for information pertaining to the entire conference. We encourage you to provide feedback on how we can make your experience organizing an FFC conference a rewarding one.

We offer a special discount on the conference registration fee for all Organizing Committee Members. Your participation is vital to FFC’s success. Thank you again for your help.


Conference Program

September 22, 2016

8:15 -8:45 Registrations

8:45-9:05 Welcome and Opening Remarks: Definition and Current Status of Functional Foods in the US. DanikMartirosyan, Co-chairman: President, Functional Food Center; Dallas, TX, USA. 

9:05:9:35 Jun Nishihira, MD, PhD, Professor (Keynote Speaker), Department of Medical Management and Informatics, Health Information Science Center, Hokkaido Information University, Ebetsu, Hokkaido, Japan. Lactobacillus gasseri SBT2055 stimulates immunoglobulin production and innate immunity after influenza vaccination in healthy adult volunteers: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study

Session 1: The Status and Regulation of Nutraceuticals, Functional and Medical Foods. Health Claims. Session Chair: Gabriela Riscuta, MD, Program Director, Division of Cancer Prevention, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda MD, USA 

9:35-10:00 Bruce P. Burnett (Plenary Speaker), PhD, Vice President of Compliance, Regulatory and Medical Affairs, Entera Health, Inc., Cary, NC, USA. Medical foods: An essential therapeutic category in search of definition and FDA clarification in the United States

10:00-10:20 Debasis Bagchi, PhD, Professor, Department of Pharmacological and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Houston College of Pharmacy, Houston, TX, USA. Nutraceutical regulations in the United States with a special emphasis on GRAS (Generally Recognized as Safe) status and label claims.

10:20-10:40 Malcolm Riley, PhD, Nutrition Scientist, Food and Nutrition, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute, Adelaide, Australia. Health Claims on Food Packaging – little apparent need from South Australian adults

10:40-11:10 Paula Trumbo (Keynote Speaker), PhD, Director (A) Nutrition Programs at U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition. FDA health claims for foods and dietary supplements 

11:10-11:25 Coffee and Exhibitor break 

Session 2: Functional Foods for Metabolic Syndrome, Obesity and Diabetes: Session Chair: Harry G. Preuss, MD, Professor, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC,USA

11:25-11:50 Yasuhito Shirai, PhD, Professor (Plenary Speaker), Department of Agrobioscience, Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Kobe University, Kobe, Japan. Possibility of epigallocatechin gallate and a-tocopherol as functional food for diabetic nephropathy and their molecular mechanism

11:50-12:05 Valentina Guzmán-Pérez, PhD, Department of Nutrition and Biochemistry, Sciences Faculty- Pontificia Universidad Javeriana Bogota D.C, Colombia. Isothiocyanates from the edible plant nasturtium and the prevention of type 2 diabetes: Reduction in glucose production and modulation of protective pathways

12:05-12:20 Anand Swaroop, PhD, FACN, President, Cepham Research Center, Piscataway, NJ, USA. Safety and Efficacy of a novel fenugreek seed (Trigonella foenum-graecum, FenfuroTM) extract in patients with Type-2 Diabetes

12:20-12:35 Joanne Smith and Kylie James, University of Maryland Rehabilitation and Orthopaedic Institute. Baltimore, Maryland, USA. Body mass, metabolic and cardiovascular impact of aquatic exercise and nutritional guidance for individuals with chronic incomplete spinal cord injury

12:35-12:50 Manashi Bagchi, PhD, Cepham Research Center, Piscataway, NJ, USA. Clinical efficacy of a novel green coffee bean extract (GCB-70) in overweight subjects

12:50-13:10 Harry G. Preuss, MD, Professor, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC,USA. General lack of correlations between age and signs of metabolic syndrome in subjects with non-diabetic fasting glucose levels

13:10-14:00 Lunch

Session 3: Functional Foods and Neurological Diseases. Session Chairs: Bruce P. Burnett, PhD, Vice President of Compliance, Regulatory and Medical Affairs, Entera Health, Inc., Cary, NC, USA and  Carol Dillon, MD, PhD, CEMIC University Hospital, Argentina, Buenos Aires, Argentina

14:00-14:15 Amelie Mantello, Osato Research Institute, Gifu, Japan and Francesco Marotta, MD, PhD, Professor, ReGenera Research Group for Aging Intervention, Milan, Italy. A 2-year follow up study with fermented papaya preparation (FPP) modulating novel risk markers of cardiovascular and neurodegenerative disease in middle-age subjects with impending metabolic syndrome

14:15-14:30 Carol Dillon, MD, PhD, National Scientific and Technical Research Council (CONICET); SIREN, Department of Neurology. CEMIC University Hospital, Argentina, Buenos Aires, Argentina. Sociological and environmental factors associated with mental health. A follow up study of patients with Geriatric Depression and Cognitive Impairment

14:30-14:45 Sushil Sharma, PhD, Professor of Pharmacology, Saint James School of Medicine Cane Hall, St Vincent St, Vincent & Grenadines. Charnoly body as a novel biomarker of nutritional stress in alzheimer’s disease

14:45-15:00 Komal Chauhan, PhD, Associate Professor, Department of Foods and Nutrition, The Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda, Vadodara, Gujarat, India. Vitamin B12 supplementation and cognitive scores in geriatric patients having Mild Cognitive Impairment

15:00-15:20Coffee and Exhibitor break

Session 4: Functional Foods and Cancer. Session Chairs: Jin-Rong Zhou, PhD, Nutrition/Metabolism Laboratory, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA and Nancy J. Emenaker, PhD, Program Director, Division of Cancer Prevention, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, MD, USA.

15:20-15:45 Gabriela Riscuta (Plenary Speaker) MD, Program Director Nutritional Science Research Group, Division of Cancer Prevention, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health (NIH), Bethesda MD, USA. Potential benefits of probiotics consumption (Invited Speaker)

15:45 -16-00 Zeynep Banu Guzel-Seydim, PhD, Professor, Department of Food Engineering, Suleyman Demirel University, Isparta, Turkey. Effect of kefir on Fusobacterium nucleatum potentially causing intestinal cancer

16:00-16:15 Roula M. Abdel-Massih, PhD, Associate Professor, Department of Biology, University of Balamand, Lebanon. The Immuno-modulatory and anti-proliferative activity of high molecular weight and modified citrus pectin

16:15-16:30 Vasantha Rupasinghe, PhD, Professor, Department of Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Agriculture, Dalhousie University, Truro, Canada. Apple peel flavonoids AF4 inhibit triple negative breast cancer cell proliferation and migration

16:30-17:10 Poster and Networking Session

17:10 Conference Closing 

September 23, 2016

Session 5: Prevention and Management of Dementia. Session Chairs: Hoyoku Nishino, MD, PhD, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicin, Kyoto, Japan and Elizabeth Johnson, Ph.D, Antioxidants Research Laboratory, Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University, Boston, MA, USA

8:15-8:40 Elizabeth Johnson (Plenary Speaker), PhD,Associate Professor, Antioxidants Research Laboratory, Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University, Boston, MA, USAThe role of lutein in cognitive function 

8:40-8:55 Hoyoku Nishino, MD, PhD, Professor, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicin, Kyoto, Japan. Functional food factors and prevention of dementia

8:55-9:10 Rachel Wong, PhD, School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy, University of Newcastle, Callaghan, Australia. Acute resveratrol consumption improves cerebrovascular responsiveness during a working memory task in adults with type 2 diabetes 

9:10-9:25 Barbara Shukitt-Hale, Ph.D, Neuroscience and Aging Laboratory, USDA-ARS Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University, Boston, MA. The beneficial effects of berry fruit on cognitive and neuronal function in aging

9:25-9:40 Tammy M. Scott, Ph.D, Scientist II, Neuroscience and Laboratory, Jean Mayer USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University, Boston, MA, USA. Long Chain Omega-3 Fatty Acids, Cognitive Aging, and Dementia 

9:40:-10:00 Francine Grodstein, ScD, Professor of Medicine, Channing Division of Network Medicine, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. Consumption of fruit and vegetables in relation to cognitive function in aging populations 

Session 6: Roles of Food Derived Nitrite / Nitrate from Cured Meat to Vegetables, to Hypertension and/or Antioxidant Effect. Session ChairHiroshi Maeda, PhD, Professor, Sojo University, Japan

10:00-10:10 Hiroshi Maeda, PhD, Professor, Sojo University, Japan. Opening remarksRoles of food derived nitrite / nitrate from cured meat to vegetables

<10:10-10:35 Nathan S. Bryan (Plenary Speaker), PhD, Professor, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX USA. Dietary nitrite and nitrate: From menace to marvel

10:35-10:55 Weili Li, PhD, Professor, University of Chester, Chester, UK. Arabinoxylan extracts for immunity: modulation pathway

Jacklyn Jackson, PhD Candidate, School of Health Sciences, University of Newcastle, Callaghan NSW 2308, Australia. What is the role of inorganic nitrate and nitrite in cardiovascular disease: A Systematic Review of Human Evidence (Title pending)

10:55-11:15 Coffee and Exhibitor Break

Session 7: Functional Foods and Bioactive Compound(s): Prevention and Management of other Non-communicable Diseases. Session Chair: Debasis Bagchi, PhD, Professor, Department of Pharmacological and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Houston College of Pharmacy, Houston, TX, USA

11:15-11:40 Christina B. Wegener, PhD (Plenary Speaker), Julius Kuehn Institute (JKI); Institute for Resistance Research and Stress Tolerance, Sanitz, Germany. Drought stress affects organic and inorganic bioactive compounds in potatoes relevant to non-communicable diseases

11:40-11:55 Francesco Carluccio, Professor, Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences and Technologies, University of Salento, Lecce, Italy. Integrated medicine with vegetable derived antioxidant and vitamin D: effects on oxidative stress and bone mineral metabolism of aged patients with renal disease

11:55-12:10 Atif Can Seydim, PhD, Professor. Department of Food Engineering, Suleyman Demirel University Faculty of Engineering, Isparta, Turkey. Effects of grape wine and apple cider vinegar on oxidative and antioxidative status in high cholesterol-fed rats

12:10-12:25 Ananda S. Prasad, MD, PhD, Distinguished Professor of Oncology, Department of Oncology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, and Karmanos Cancer Center, Detroit, Michigan, USA. Discovery and impact of zinc on human health: Bio-markers of zinc deficiency

12:25-12:45 Debasis Bagchi, PhD, Professor, Department of Pharmacological and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Houston College of Pharmacy, Houston, TX, USA. Efficacy of Furosap, a novel Trigonella foenum-graecum seed extract, in enhancing testosterone level and improving sperm profile in male volunteers

12:45-13:45 Lunch

Session 8: Current Research and Development of New Functional Food Products. Session Chairs: Zhongyi Li PhD, Principal Research Scientist, CSIRO Plant Industry, Canberra, Australia and Vijaya Juturu, PhD, FACN, Scientific and Clinical Affairs, OmniActive Health Technologies Inc., Morristown, NJ, USA 

13:45-14:10 Peter F. Kador (Plenary Speaker), PhD, Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, USA. and President, Therapeutic Vision, Inc., Omaha, NE, USA. Topical applied nutraceutical antioxidant formulation reduces ocular oxidative stress

14:10-14:25 Jerzy "George" Szewczyk, PhD, CEO, BioKier Inc., Chapel Hill, NC, USA. Colonic delivery of nutrients for management of blood glucose in type 2 diabetes patients

14:25-14:40 María Dolores del Castillo, PhD, Head of Food Bioscience group, Department of Food Analysis and Bioactivity, Institute of Food Science Research, Spain. Coffee silverskin extract for diabetes

14:40-14:55 Johannes Westendorf, PhD, Professoer Emeritus, Institute of Experimental Pharmacology and Toxicology University Medical School, Germany. Pharmacokinetic of 3H-deacetylasperulosidic acid in mice

14:55-15:10 Doman Kim, PhD, Professor, Seoul National University, Republic of Korea. Enzymatic synthesis of glycosides, their functional characterization, and potential uses

15:10-15:25 Nazma Shaheen, PhD, Professor, Director, Institute of Nutrition and Food Science, University of Dhaka. Evaluation of functional potentiality of selected commonly consumed foods of Bangladesh

15:25-15:40 Zhongyi Li, PhD, Principal Research Scientist, CSIRO Plant Industry, Canberra, Australia. Developing a barley grain containing high fibre and high resistant starch

Coffee and Exhibitor Break: 15:40-16:00

Poster and Networking Session 16:00-16:40

16:40-17:00 Awards and Membership Certificates (Membership for Academic Society of Functional Foods and Bioactive Compounds). 

17:00-17:15 Conference Closing


Submit a Proposal to Host our Next Conference

Are you interested in hosting one of our International Conferences? The Functional Food Center and Academic Society for Functional Foods and Bioactive Compounds is now accepting conference proposals for the years 2016 - 2018. Proposals may be submitted by any university or organization related to functional and medical foods, bioactive compounds (prebiotic compounds, sterols, minerals, vitamins, anthocyanins, anthocyanidins, dietary fiber, flavonoids, flavonols, lipids, omega-3 fatty acids, phenolic acid, polyphenol, phytochemicals, phytoestrogen, etc.), nutrition, nutrigenomics, or prevention and management of chronic diseases (such as diabetes, obesity, cancer, cardiovascular disorders, metabolic syndrome, etc.).

The main goal of our conferences is to bring together experts in medicine, biology and the food industry to discuss the contribution of functional/medical foods and bioactive compounds in the prevention and management of chronic diseases. In your proposal, please list:

  1. Your name, contact information, and bio-sketch
  2. Event date
  3. Location
  4. Conference title, topics, and highlighted concepts
  5. Conference room reservation
  6. Sponsors (if available)
  7. Relevant industry perspectives (optional)
  8. Potential organizing committee members and keynote speakers may also be included

Also in your proposal, please include 3 statements that specifies:

  1. That your organization agrees to be a co-organizer of this conference 
  2. Why your proposed meeting is important in the functional food community
  3. Why your meeting topic is timely or important now

Proposals can be submitted at any time of the year by email. Topics regarding bioactive compounds, functional foods, medical foods and/or chronic diseases including CVD, diabetes and obesity are encouraged. Topics must be relevant to functional foods and/or bioactive compounds. All functional food related concepts and proposals are welcome and we thank you in advance for your interest in submitting a conference proposal with Functional Food Center.

Proposals will be reviewed by the Scientific Panel of Functional Food Center, Academic Society of Functional Foods and Bioactive Compounds, and Editors-in-Chief of the Journal of Functional Foods in Health and Disease. Once your proposal has been submitted, we will contact you within 7 business days to discuss future collaboration.

Please e-mail proposals to: ffc_usa@sbcglobal.net.



Exhibitors Information:

All vendors have a separate exhibitor table at the conference. The two tables will be located near the conference area and will have sufficient access to conference participants. The international conference will attract many experts from food processing companies, universities, research centers, and related industries from around the world, such as local restaurants and bakeries. This will be a great opportunity to introduce yourself to many international organizations. The cost for vendors is $795.00, which includes one (1) full registration for the conference.

There is a limited amount of space. Please purchase your conference registration ticket and provide your company description, which will appear on the conference website with your sponsorship level, or exhibit booth, listed alongside a hyperlink to your website. Limit the company description to no more than 35 words.

You can fill out the registration form and make a payment for the registration fee to become a vendor for this International Conference. An email confirmation will be sent within two days of the submission date.

If you have any questions, feel free to email us at ffc@functionalfoodcenter.com


FFC's Exhibitors at Harvard Medical School (from previous conference)

  • BESO Biological Research Inc., 21660 Copley Dr. Ste# 180, Diamond Bar, CA 91767, USA. Website: http://besoinc.com/home.html. Based in CA, U.S.A. BESO develops nutritional products ranging from daily nutrition to supportive needs. Our products are made with 100% fermented foods that help increase bioavailability and improve nutrient absorption. Our formulation contains a natural (non-synthetic) bio-active compound called 13-Methyltetradecanoic acid.

BESO Logo

  • Danem Dairy Products, Inc., Suleyman Demirel University Technopark, East Campus, 32260 Isparta, Turkey. Web Site: http://www.kefirdanem.com. Danem’s purpose is to protect, maintain and produce genuine kefir grains that contain all of the probiotic bacterial and yeast strains naturally found in traditional kefir. From these grains, we produce our traditional kefir product, Kefirzadem™, with no additives. Using our kefir grains produces kefir with the highest level of natural strains and a magnificent flavor. After a long academic research period, our significant scientific and technical knowledge was transferred to an industrial scale at Danem, Inc. Along with other patent-pending technology, Danem holds three patents on natural kefir and yogurt production from non-GMO, natural probiotic microflora. Danem is the first company in the world that produces significant amounts of non-GMO natural kefir grains, kefir starter culture, natural kefir from kefir grains as well as probiotic yogurt starter culture. Continued research indicates that consumption of our products can contribute significantly to improved health.

Danem Dairy Products Logo

  • Food Science Publisher, 4659 Texas St, San Diego CA, USA. Website: http://functionalfoodscenter.net/food-science-publisher.html. Food Science Publisher is especially interested in human clinical nutrition, functional food science and chronic disease aspects of the publishing field. The company specializes in publishing books in the field of food science, nutrition, functional foods and chronic diseases.

Publisher Logo

  • Vibrant America, 1021 Howard Avenue Suite B, San Carlos, CA 94070-4034, USA. Website: https://www.vibrant-america.com/. Vibrant strives to become the leader in autoimmune diagnostics. Our platform allows us to provide results 4 days sooner than any other regional or specialized laboratory. We are committed to providing the best services and a clinically relevant menu of testing options to accommodate healthcare providers and their patients.

Vibrant America

  • Lifeway Foods, Inc., 6431 West Oakton St. Morton Grove, IL 60053, USA. Website: http://lifewaykefir.com/. Lifeway Foods, America’s leading supplier of the probiotic fermented beverage known as kefir, is on a mission to provide the best probiotic and nutritious foods to consumers. Lifeway has also innovated several new ideas in the dairy industry by introducing breakthrough products. The company is committed to four ideals: all natural hormone and GMO-free ingredients, philanthropy, environmental responsibility, and local farming sustainability.

Lifeway Logo

Osato Research Institute, 1956 Inatomi, Ono-cho, Ibi-gun, Gifu, 501-0501, Japan. Website: http://en.ori-japan.com/. Osato Research Institute works with universities and institutes around the world to support research on FFP® (Fermented Papaya Preparation) and its effect on healthy aging. One of their many goals to is to reduce medical costs associated with aging through preventative therapeutic strategies and education.

FPP Round Logo

ORI Logo


Conference Organizing Committee

Co-chairman: Jin-Rong Zhou, PhD, Associate Professor of Surgery, Harvard Medical School, Director, Nutrition/Metabolism Laboratory, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA

Co-chairman: Danik M. Martirosyan, PhD, President, Functional Food Center; Editor-In-Chief, The Journal of Functional Foods in Health and Disease, Dallas, TX, USA

Manoj K. Bhasin, PhD, Department of Medicine, Division of Interdisciplinary Medicine and Biotechnology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA

Francine Welty, MD, PhD, Associate Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, Board-Certified Cardiologist at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA

John W Froehlich, PhD, Harvard Medical School, Urology Department at Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA, USA

Daniela Buscariollo, MD, Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Harvard Radiation Oncology Social Committee Leader, Boston, MA, USA

p">Hoyoku NishinoMD, PhD, Professor, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, President, International Union of Wellness Science, President, Beautiful Life Science Society, Kyoto, Japan  <p">Hiroshi Maeda, MD, PhD, Professor, Institute of Drug Delivery Science, Sojo University, Nishi-ku, Kumamoto, Japan

Nancy J. Emenaker, PhD, Program Director, Nutritional Science Research Group, Division of Cancer Prevention, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD, USA

Yasuhito Shirai, PhD, Professor, Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Department of Agrobioscience, Kobe University, Kobe, Japan

Elizabeth Johnson, PhD, Associate Professor, Gerald J. and Dorothy R. Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tafts University, Somerville, MA, USA

Zhongyi Li PhD, Principal Research Scientist, CSIRO Plant Industry, Canberra, Australia

Francesco Marotta, MD, PhD, Professor, ReGenera Research Group for Aging Intervention, Milan, Italy; Montenapoleone Medical Center, Milano, Italy


Poster presentation recommendations:

Conference Poster Presentations: Poster presentations give the audience a clear visual of the presenter's work in a simple format. The reasonable size for posters is 2.5-3.0 feet high by 3.5-4 feet wide.

  1. Present the title, the author(s), affiliation(s), and a description of the research, along with highlighting the abstract's major elements.

  2. Minimize detail and try to use simple statements. Keep it short and easy to read.

  3. Remember that pictures, tables, and figures are key to any poster display.

  4. If possible, use color in your visuals.

  5. Don't overwhelm the audience with excessive information. Instead, construct a display that enhances the presentation.

  6. At least 50% of the surface area should be used for photos, graphs and diagrams.

  7. Use a clear structure and layout.

  8. Use complementary colors. Use black or dark blue for text. Too much color can be hard to read!

  9. One or two large, high quality photographs attract attention.

  10. Your title should be a condensed statement of the main idea of your poster. It should be large and clear.

  11. Your poster title should be easily readable from a distance of 3-4 meters.  Include author(s) name(s), and address(es).

  12. We recommend the following sections on the poster: Abstract, Introduction, Methods, Tables, Figures, Results, and Conclusions.

  13. Please confirm your poster number on the list. The posters with odd number will be presented on September 22, and the posters with even number will be presented on September 23.

  14. Please put up your own poster in the position indicated by your presentation number by noon of each day. Presentation numbers are already indicated on display panels. Please check your presentation number and be careful to put up your poster on the correct panel. Please use pins to put up posters. Please do not use glue or sellotape.

  15. Please present your work in front of your own poster during the poster session.

  16. The best poster presentation award will be chosen by votes of all participants.

  17. Posters will be changed every day. Please help by taking your own poster down. Posters still displayed after the removal time has passed will be disposed of by the secretary the following day.

Posters approved for the presentation:

P1

Amanda Stefanson

A novel phyto-oxylipin CX confers acute and systemic anti-inflammatory effect in the liver and small intestine

P2

Syeda T. Begum

A dietary portfolio modulates SIRT1 expression in astrocytes and reduces brain inflammation while improving working memory in a transgenic mice model of Alzheimer disease

P3

Mehrdad Larry

Comparing the Effect of Memantine on Metabolism, Oxidative Stress and Antioxidant Reserve in Patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment with and without Type 2 Diabetes; an Experimental Clinical Trial

P4

Jiyoung Kim

Sulforaphane ameliorates memory deficits in a triple-transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease: its effects on brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression

P5

Hulda N.M. Chambi

Dehydrated melon containing antioxidants from grape juice

P6

Houssein Mirmiranpoor

Assessment of curcumin effect on antioxidants in type 2 diabetic patients

P7

Esther Nwanna

Distribution of polyphenols in some species of african eggplant fruits (Solanum spp) inhibits α-amylase, α-glucosidase and angiotensin-1-converting enzyme activities in-vitro

P8

Keiji Wakabayashi

Inhibitory effect of citrus peel on colon carcinogenesis with suppression of oxidative stress

P9

Natchanan Yotpinta

Key enzyme inhibitory properties related to some non-communicable diseases from defatted rice bran protein isolate and protein hydrolysates

P10

Uthaiwan Suttisansanee

Health benefit, food safety and product development of local plants at conserved area of Plant Genetic Conservation Project under the Royal Initiative of Her Royal Highness Princess Maha Chakri Sirindhorn, Kanchanaburi Province, Thailand

P11

Suwapat Kittibunchakul

Industrial defatted rice bran powder: a potent therapeutic agent for the prevention and treatment of certain chronic diseases

P12

Mary Muchiri

In vitro investigation on prebiotic properties of orange fleshed sweet potato puree and its implications to human gut health

P13

Zeynep Banu Guzel-Seydim

The natural probiotic mine: kefir grains

P14

Olumuyiwa Ogunlaja

Antioxidant and cytotoxicity activities of crude extracts and compounds from leaves and stem bark of ficus burtt-davyi

P15

Olumuyiwa Ogunlaja

Nutritional evaluation, bioaccumulation and toxicological assessment of heavy metals in edible fruits of Ficus sur Forssk. (Moraceae)

P16

Lei Huang

Effects of L. paracasei subp. paracasei X12 on cell cycle of colon cancer HT-29 cells and regulation of mTOR signaling pathway

P17

Marek Naruszewicz

Oleacein – a new approach to the prevention of human carotid plaque destabilization

P18

Roseller Simbulan Jr.

Histopathological assessment of the cardioprotective influence of Caulerpa lentillifera crude lipid extract against the development of isoproterenol-induced myocardial injury in a murine model

P19

Valeria Sandrim

Effect of resveratrol on endothelial cells incubated with plasma from preeclampsia women (in vitro model)

P20

Sheila Wicks

Interactions of food and beverages with commonly used prescription medications

P21

Matthew Oluwamukomi

Phytochemical and bioactive properties of ginger-flavoured composite biscuit from composite flour of wheat, bambara groundnut and plantain

P22

Sicong Tian

Improvement of abnormal fat metabolism by sulforaphane through the endoplasmic reticulum stress in hepatocytes

P23

Kai Lin

Angiotensin I converting enzyme inhibitory properties of enzymatic yak milk casein hydrolysates

P24

Qingjuan Tang

Polymannuronic acid of brown seaweed prevent obesity in high-fat diet mice due to its effects on gut microbiota

P25

Jiliang Zhang

Bovine Lactoferrin promote the proliferation of osteoblast to prevent osteoporosis

P26

Tomohiro Matsuo

The efficacy of Japanese traditional herbal medicine for elderly patients, on nocturia due to night-time awakening

P27

Zhaoxu Meng

Bacterial diversity and technological, functional and safety characterization of Non-starter lactic acid bacteria strains in goat cheeses

P28

Ana Penna

Water Buffalo Mozzarella cheese as a source of potential probiotic lactic acid bacteria for application in functional food

P29

Ana Penna

Selection of Lactobacillus spp. strains for the development of innovative probiotic functional fermented products

P30

Martina La Spina Transcription Factor EB is a crucial transducer of the biomedical action of Pterostilbene

P31

Liang Xin The psychrotrophic bacteria diversity from raw milk of North China and their proteolytic property

P32

Ulrika Wendel Single chain antibodies against advanced glycation endproducts evaluated with synthetically modified peptides and proteins

P33

Hairong Cheng Xylitol production from waste xylose mother liquor containing miscellaneous sugars and inhibitors: one-pot biotransformation by Candida tropicalis and recombinant Bacillus subtilis

P34

Hongying Lin Puerarin and isoflavones from kudzu root (Pueraria lobata Ohwi) prevent acute drunkenness and relieve alcoholism in mice

P35

Linzheng Lyu Study on the immune function of the mice with the Schisandra Chinensis fermented wine

P36

Mark Mann Protective influence of virgin coconut Cocos nucifera oil supplementation against the development of N-methyl-N-nitrosourea-induced mammary neoplasia in a murine model

P37

Wei-Ting Tseng Anserine dipeptide from fish extracts ameliorate the uric acid levels in fructose-induced HK2 cells and hyperuricemic patients

P38

Mahshid Sirjani Assessment of serum adiponectin, leptin and specific IgE levels in children with food allergy

P39

Lu Zhang Garlic-Derived S-Allylmercaptocysteine ameliorates the obesity induced bone loss

P40

Si-Yeon Jeong Neuroprotective effects of phytoestrogens derived from Flemingia strobilifera via enhancing neuroglobin expression

P41

Zeynep Guzel Seydim The effect of kefir produced from the natural kefir grains on the intestinal microorganisms of the BALB/c mice

P42

Akihiro Asai Green tea polyphenol induces changes in cancer-related factors in an animal model of bladder cancer

P43

Kana Sakaguchi The elucidation of the mechanism of lentinan-induced inflammatory suppression by visualizing TNFR1 on the membrane

P44

Roula Abdel-Massih Antibacterial activity of Ilex paraguariensis (Yerba Mate) against gram positive and gram negative bacteria
P45 Nancy Emenaker What’s in your dietary fiber supplement? Using the dietary supplement label database (DSLD) to determine total dietary fiber levels for use in oncology community health care
P46 Brenda Perez-Grijalva Blackberry juice’s protective effect in rats under a hypercaloric diet
P47 Nazma Shaheen The profile of polyphenols and antioxidant capacity of selected medicinal plants of Bangladesh
P48 Ximena Palma Effect of different concentrations of proteins in a high soluble fiber food on short-term satiety in healthy young adults
P49 Marselinny Mawuntu Health conscientiousness of gluten and diet-related food choices of students at Southern Adventist University
P50 Amaia Iriondo-de Hond Coffee silverskin extract protects against benzo (a) pyrene induced DNA damage
P51 Jay Whelan A combination of herbal extracts increases LKB1-dependent activation of AMPK, a result not shared by CaMKK2
P52 Minzhong Yu Lutein and Zeaxanthin isomers protect photoreceptors against blue light-induced degeneration
P53 Vijaya Juturu Beta-cryptoxanthin (BCX) improves lung function and reduces stress induced inflammation: In vivo model
P54 Daiki Hayashi Oral administration of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCg) improved diabetic nephropathy in mice
P55 Enrica Bargiacchi Traced tuscan food for breast-cancer surgery-treated patients under chemotherapy: a program for a clinical trial at the Breast Center of Pisa-Italy University Hospital
P56 Gaby Fahmy Linkage of diet and inflammation: measuring c-reactive protein in experimental mice given variable diets
P57 Na Zhang Impact of casein non-phosphopeptides on sarcopenia using CT scanning technology
P58 Francesco Carluccio Effects of lycopene diet supplementation on cholesterol oxidation products and hemoglobin values in aged persons with chronic kidney disease and anemia
P59 María Dolores del Castillo Antioxidant coffee dietary fiber for gastrointestinal health and diabetes
P60 Jacklyn Jackson What is the role of inorganic nitrate and nitrite in cardiovascular disease: A Systematic Review of Human Evidence
P61 Yujuan Shan Protective effects of Sulforaphane on human bladder cancer both in vivo and in vitro


Registration Form


Scholarships:

Academic Society of Functional Foods and Bioactive Compounds (ASFFBC) Young Investigator Scholarship Recipients:

Rachel Wong

University of Newcastle, Australia

Syeda Tauqeerunnisa Begum

CINVESTAV, Mexico

Amanda Stefanson

University of Guelph, Canada

Hulda N. M. Chambi

University of Campinas, Brazil

The nominees were selected from a pool of 20 applicants and reviewed by the 20th International Conference of FFC Organizing Committee. The listed scholarship recipients are based on the committee members’ rankings.

 *At the conclusion of the conference scholarship recipients will receive certificates for the scholarship award and participation.


Deadlines:

Scholarship applications for the 20th International conference of FFC must be submitted by 5:00 pm February 8, 2016. Other important deadlines to consider are:

Abstract Deadline: May 31, 2016 5:00 pm (EST)

Early Bird Registration Deadline: Feb. 22, 2016 5:00 pm (EST)

Award Information:

Functional Food Center is pleased to be offering scholarships to students and postdoc fellows. The purpose of these scholarships is to help students pay for the expenses of attending our conferences. FFC understands it can be expensive for students and academia to afford presenting at conferences, so we hope this financial assistance will support selected applicants present their posters at our conferences.

Scholarship winners will be offered reimbursement of expenses associated with attending our conferences (up to 500 USD). These costs include possible airfare, transportation, hotel stays, and the conference registration. Please note: receipts will be required to receive reimbursement.

Scholarship recipients will be selected by the conference organizing committee who will review each submitted abstract on the quality of the scientific, the objective’s relevance to the conference topic, and presented findings.

Eligible Applicants:

  • Students and postdoctoral fellows who submit abstract(s) for poster presentation(s) 
  • Students who are currently enrolled at an academic institution in a Master’s, PhD, and/or MD program will be considered
  • Postdoctoral fellows with a Ph.D. and/or M.D. degree at an academic institution who are conducting research after the completion of their doctoral studies will also be considered

An applicant is eligible to receive one award per conference. If one or more abstracts are submitted from the same lab only one applicant will be awarded.

Criteria for Abstract Review:

For general information on abstract submission requirements, please click on the Abstract Submission tab. The conference organizing committee will review each submitted scholarship application according to the following criteria:

  1. Abstract is relevant to the conference topic(s)
  2. Objective and problem are clearly articulated
  3. Methods, findings, and results are explained and related to research question
  4. Study and findings have potential to inspire discussion on functional food and chronic diseases
  5. Style and language used
  • Abstracts should be written in US English or British English
  • Abstracts should be free of spelling and grammatical errors, including limited abbreviations usage, little to none typography errors, and italics are used appropriately

For information on abstract submission requirements, please click here: http://functionalfoodscenter.net.

Application and Submission Requirements:

If you match the eligibility requirements and want to be considered for a scholarship, you should complete all of the following by the scholarship deadline for the conference you wish to present and attend. It is recommended to submit the scholarship application before the deadline to ensure completeness.

  • Submit an abstract for the conference to which you are applying
  • Have your mentor submit a letter via our email ffc@functionalfoodcenter.com to confirm your status as a student or postdoc fellow at an academic institution
  • Complete the Scholarship Form 

To apply for a scholarship, visit the conference page that you wish to attend and click the "Scholarship Form" tab or copy & paste http://functionalfoodscenter.net into a new browser.

Late scholarship applications will not be accepted.

Although full articles do not need to be submitted before the scholarship deadline, full-text papers should be submitted before the abstract deadline. To find out how to submit an article to The Journal of Functional Foods in Health and Disease (FFHD), please click here: http://www.ffhdj.com/

Notification for Scholarships:

Once the organizing committee has reviewed all of the scholarship applications, we will immediately send an email to notify all scholarship applicants. Award winners will also be listed on the website page to recognize those with the best abstracts. You should receive an email before the Early Bird Registration Deadline so you are able to register at a discounted price.

Requirements of Scholarship Winner:

In order for scholarship recipients to be reimbursed by FFC they must complete these necessary requirements:

  1. Present their poster at the conference
  2. Keep all receipts of travel and registration for the conference
  3. Complete an exit survey after the conference

After you complete these tasks and send us your proof of purchases associated with attending the conference, FFC will send you a check for reimbursement.


Scholarship Form


Sponsorship Opportunities

Dear Future Sponsor,

I wish to inform you about an excellent sponsorship opportunity for your company to gain high-quality exposure in the health food industry. Functional foods and bioactive compounds are currently receiving an increased amount of attention from the scientific community, as well as the public. The Functional Food Center’s 22nd International Conference will be held at the Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. It will be timely in presenting new and relevant information focused on the importance of bioactive compounds and functional foods.

Conference Center at Harvar Since 1998, the Functional Food Center has been a pioneer in the functional food industry. It combines cutting-edge expertise in the biomedical sciences with practical business experience, to aid further research, development, and commercialization of functional food innovations in both domestic and international markets. The Functional Food Center connects a global network of professionals (scientists, functional food experts, and food industry representatives) to a conducive environment for innovative research collaboration. Since 2004, the FFC has organized conferences together with top universities. Scientists, researchers, and food industry professionals present their research and discoveries about healthy, functional, and medical foods with bioactive compounds. In response to the growth of this field, we are proud to introduce the Academic Society for Functional Foods and Bioactive Compounds.

This society of medical doctors, scientists, dietitians, nutritionists and other food and medical industry professionals will be strictly dedicated to the research and development of functional and medical foods, bioactive compounds, and the discovery of new ingredients.

Partnering with the Functional Food Center by sponsoring our upcoming conference will provide your company with several valuable benefits. These include but are not limited to:

1) Your names and logos endlessly stay on our website, which has about 4800 visitors per month, and have an opening rate of 13% for the newsletter.

2) Your logo will be included in the conference website, promotional materials, and Functional Food Center’s bi-monthly newsletter, which is received by over 700,000 readers including scientists, medical doctors, nutritionists and dieticians.

3) FDA, USDA, and NIH representatives attend our conferences, and you may contact them directly at the time of conference.

4) An option for annual and lifetime sponsorship.

5) Each level of sponsorship will contain a certain number of attendee rights, which allow free-of-charge admission to our conference.

6) You will have the unique opportunity to meet with decision-makers in this field, receive information/support on how to make a new, healthy product, and provide oral presentations about a related topic.

7) The Academic Society for Functional Foods and Bioactive Compounds and Functional Food Center can advise you on how to create a new, healthy and functional product (this can be a separate discussion).

We look forward hearing from you.

Sincerely,

Danik M. Martirosyan, PhD

President of Academic Society for Functional Foods and Bioactive Compounds,

Founder of Functional Food Center, Inc.


Sponsorship Prospectus

Please join us for an exciting opportunity!

We are pleased to invite you to a conference in Boston, MA, USA, on September 20-21, 2018.

The Functional Food Center, The Journal of Functional Foods in Health and Disease, Academic Society for Functional Foods and Bioactive Compounds would all be honored for you to join us at our conference. We will bring together experts in medicine, biology and the food industry to discuss the contribution of functional/medical foods and bioactive compounds in the prevention and management of chronic diseases.

With over 175 expected participants, the conference provides a great opportunity to increase the visibility of your company and exhibit products and services to an international group of researchers, clinicians, post-docs and next-generation scientists.

Sponsors and exhibitors will be exposed to a wide audience and will have many promotional opportunities.

Below are details regarding the sponsorship and exhibitor packages. We hope you find the right package for your needs. We look forward to collaborating with you in the future, and hope to see you in Germany.

Since 2004, the Functional Food Center has organized conferences where scientists, researchers, and food industry professionals present their discoveries in the realm of functional foods and bioactive compounds.

The Conference Organizing Committee is pleased to announce the 24th International Conference of FFC - 12th International Symposium of ASFFBC will be held at the Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA on September 20-21, 2018.

The Functional Food Center is a valuable resource for businesses in the food industry. The benefits of sponsorship include but are not limited to:

  • Developing various connections through conference participation, such as medical doctors, food scientists, food industry representatives, dieticians and nutritionists.
  • Information on the latest research and discoveries in the realm of functional foods and bioactive compounds, to develop, market and commercialize healthy products.
  • The ability (if eligible) to gain recognition in the food industry by joining our board of Medical and Food Industry Experts.

Sponsorship funding goes to support conference organization and conference promotion. We are also willing to work with companies who are interested in specifically sponsoring student registration, student travel, international scientist travel, conference lunches, conference receptions, or abstract book publication.

Co-chairman: Danik M. Martirosyan, PhD, President, Functional Food Center/Functional Food Institute; Editor-In-Chief, The Journal of Functional Foods in Health and Disease, Dallas, TX, USA.


Sponsorship Levels and Benefits:

Sponsorship Type / Benefit

Diamond

Platinum

Gold

Silver

Bronze

Sponsorships Available

1

2

3

6

No Limit

Cost

$40,000

$20,000

$10,000

$5,000

$2,500

Attendee Rights

5 Free

4 Free

3 Free

2 Free

1 Free

Lifetime Sponsorship

Yes

Annual Sponsorship

Yes

Yes

*Display Table

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Logo Included in Conference Website

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Logo Included in Promotional Materials

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Acknowledgement in Abstract Book

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Distribution of Company Brochure

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

**Conduct Special Session

Yes

Yes

Yes

***Logo Included in Newsletters

Yes

Yes

Yes

Logo Displayed in Meeting Room

Yes

Yes

****Advertisement in Abstract Book

Yes (1 Page)

Yes (1 Page)

Yes (1/2 Page)

Logo Included on Conference Folder

Yes

Yes

Signage Rights

Yes

*At each conference, an area is reserved for exhibitors. However, because our conferences are held at universities, space is limited. Therefore registration is on a first-come, first-served basis.

**Your company may conduct their own special session regarding a specific topic of your choice at the conference. This is an excellent way to connect with possible collaborates with similar interests.

***Your company’s logo will be included (and linked to your company website) in our bi-monthly Functional Foods in Health and Disease Journal newsletter. It has over 450,000 subscribers including scientists, medical doctors, dietitians and nutritionists. The logo will also be included in our newsletter for the Academic Society of Functional Foods and Bioactive Compounds, which has over 2,000 members.

****In addition to the acknowledgement, Gold sponsors will receive a ½ page of advertising space in the abstract book, and both platinum and diamond sponsors will receive a full page of advertising space. This is a great way to promote your company and its products.


If you have any questions or need additional information, please contact us.

Options

Benefits

Cost

Sponsorship for Scientific Sessions

(4 available)

Sponsor recognition at the beginning of the scientific session

Sponsor name and logo will be included in the conference program, abstract book and websites

Name/logo will be included in every upcoming newsletter to more than 450,000 readers including medical doctors, scientists, etc.

$5,000 each

Social Activities Welcome Reception

(1 available)

Sponsor recognition by room signage

Sponsor name and logo will be included in the conference program and abstract book and websites

$4,500 partial

$9,000 exclusive

Badges and Lanyards

Sponsor name and logo will be included in the conference program and abstract book and websites

$2,000 exclusive

Pens

Sponsor name and logo will be included in the conference program and abstract book and websites

$2,000 exclusive

Bags

Sponsor name and logo will be included in the conference program and abstract book and websites

$2,000 exclusive

Lanyards, Pens, Badges and Bags

Sponsor name and logo will be included in the conference program and abstract book and websites

Name/logo will be included in every upcoming newsletter to more than 450,000 readers including medical doctors, scientists, etc.

$5,000 each

Conference Book Advertisement

The sponsor can place one (1) full-page advertisement (black and white) at the end of the conference program and abstract book

Sponsor name and logo will be included in the conference program and abstract book and websites

$1,000

Exhibitors

Provided with one table close to the conference area with sufficient access to coneference participants

Company description on FFC website

Includes one (1) full registration admission

$1,195

Lunches (2 available)

Name/logo will be included in every upcoming newsletter to more than 450,000 readers including medical doctors, scientists, etc.

One lunch per day; two lunches over two days

Sponsor name and logo will be included in the conference program and abstract book and websites

$2,000 per day

$3,500 exclusive

Daily Tea and Coffee Breaks

(5 available)

Five breaks over three days

Sponsor name and logo will be included in the conference program and abstract book and websites

Name/logo will be included in every upcoming newsletter to more than 450,000 readers including medical doctors, scientists, etc.

$1,000 per day

$4,000 exclusive

Banquet (1 available)

$6,000

Terms of Agreement

  1. Sponsorship will be awarded on a first-come, first-serve basis. Sponsorship will not be reserved until full payment is received.
  2. The sponsor is responsible for all materials, printing, customization and shipping-related costs associated with supplying the logo materials to FFC

Main Conference Topics/Sessions

Session: Functional Food Definition and the Status of Functional Foods in Japan, China, USA and other Countries

  • The regulations, policy, and labeling of functional foods in Japan 
  • Weaknesses and strong points of FOSHU/Food for Special Health Usage
  • The regulations, policy, and labeling of functional foods in China 
  • What is the status of Functional Foods in the USA? Expert opinions from NIH, USDA, and FDA
  • How the new definition of Functional Foods can help to improve the status of functional foods word wide

Session: Health Claims: Nutraceutical, Functional and Medical Food Regulations

  • Regulatory issues and barriers
  • Legislation on health claims: healthy, functional and medical foods
  • Regulations, policy, and labeling of regular, functional and medical food products
  • Domestic and international regulations of health claims
  • The activities dealing with the proper labeling of foods

Session: Functional Foods and Obesity

  • Epidemiology of obesity
  • The modern mechanisms of obesity; energy metabolism and obesity; neurobiological mechanisms of obesity; microbiological mechanisms of obesity; pathophysiologic mechanisms of obesity
  • Biomarkers of obesity
  • The effects of functional food and bioactive compounds on biomarkers of obesity
  • Medical foods for obesity

Session: Functional Foods and Diabetes

  • Epidemiology of diabetes
  • The modern mechanisms of diabetes
  • Biomarkers of diabetes
  • The effects of functional food and bioactive compounds on biomarkers of diabetes
  • Medical foods for diabetes

Session: Functional Foods and Neurological Diseases

  • Epidemiology of mental and neurological diseases
  • Mechanisms of neurological diseases
  • Biomarkers of different mental and neurological diseases
  • The effects of functional food and bioactive compounds on biomarkers of neurological diseases
  • Functional foods for mental and neurological diseases 
  • Medical foods for neurological diseases

Session: Functional Foods and Cardiovascular Diseases (CVD)

  • Epidemiology of CVD
  • Biomarkers of different cardiovascular diseases
  • The effects of functional food and bioactive compounds on biomarkers of cardiovascular diseases
  • Medical foods for CVD

Session: Functional Foods and Cancer

  • Epidemiology of Cancer
  • Biomarkers of different types of cancer
  • The effects of functional food and bioactive compounds on biomarkers of different types of cancer
  • Medical Foods for the Cancer

Special Session: Prebiotics, Probiotics, and Cancer

Special Session: Prevention and Management of Dementia

Session: The Efects of Nutrition and Functional Foods on Ageing and Health

Special Session: Roles of Food Derived Nitrite / Nitrate from Cured Meat to Vegetables, to Hypertension and/or Antioxidant Effect

Session: Prebiotics, Probiotics and Digestive Health

Session: Functional Foods with Bioactive Compound(s): Prevention and Management of Non-communicable Diseases

  • Functional foods and other non-communicable diseases
  • Bioactive compounds and other non-communicable diseases
  • The effects of medical food on biomarkers of non-communicable diseases

Session: Safety of the Bioactive Compounds and Functional Foods

  • Food-Drug Interactions
  • Safety of bioactive compounds at efficacious levels
  • Safety of  functional foods at efficacious levels
  • Regulatory issues and health claims

Session: Current Research and Development of New Functional Food Products.


Venue and Accommodation

The conference will take place at the Joseph B. Martin Conference Center at Harvard Medical School on September 22-23, 2016. Please read on to find more information regarding the venue, hotel, and possible places to visit while staying in Boston!

Venue

Joseph B. Martin Conference Center at Harvard Medical School

The conference will be held at the Joseph B. Martin Conference Center (77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston, MA). The conference center is located within The New Research Building at Harvard Medical School. Please refer to the campus map for directions. If you have any general question about the conference room location, directions, parking, etc., please call the conference center at 617-432-8990.

Conference Center at Harvard

Accommodations: Recommended Hotels

 342 Longwood Avenue

Boston, MA 02115

617-731-4700

www.innatlongwood.com

This is located within walking distance of MCCHMS.

138 St. James Avenue

Boston, MA 0221

617-267 5300

www.Fairmont.com/copley-plaza-boston

This is about 10 minute cab ride from the facility and also accessible on the MBTA.

40 Webster Street

Brookline, MA 02446

617-734-1393

www.brooklinecourtyard.com

Located 1.5 miles from the Conference Center;

Complimentary Shuttle Service to

Longwood Medical Area

1200 Beacon Street
Brookline, MA 02446

617-277-1200

www.holidayinn.com

Located 1.5 miles from the Conference Center;

Complimentary Shuttle Service to

Longwood Medical Area

Sheraton Boston

Westin Boston & Waterfront

W Hotel Boston

www.Starwoodhotels.com

The Sheraton and Westin are about 10 minute cab ride from the facility and also accessible on the MBTA.

Crosstown Center

811 Massachusetts Ave  Boston

617- 445-6400

www.bostonhamptoninn.com  

Complimentary Shuttle Service to

Longwood Medical Area

Boston Back Bay - Fenway

125 Brookline Avenue

Boston, MA  02215

617-236-8787

www.residenceinnbackbay.com

This is located within walking distance

of MCCHMS or a short cab ride.

Hotel Commonwealth

500 Commonwealth Avenue

Boston, MA  02215

(617) 933-5000

www.hotelcommonwealth.com

This is located within

a short cab ride.

Tourism

Boston

Boston is one of America’s oldest cities. Since 1822, it served as the economic and cultural hub of New England. Over 617,000 residents inhabit this city and millions more visit each year for the chance to immerse themselves in Boston’s rich history and vibrant culture. Home to many world-class educational institutions such as Harvard University, Boston College, Berklee College of Music, and MIT, the Boston area is a mecca for academic excellence. In addition, Boston boasts some of the best inpatient hospitals in the world. Through museums, nightlife, restaurants, and sports teams, Boston offers all the amenities and excitement of a modern metropolitan city, while managing to maintain its welcoming atmosphere and historic roots.

Places to Visit

Newbury Street: Boston's most captivating street offers eight blocks of world-renowned restaurants, coffee shops, nightlife, and shopping. With a wide variety of destinations that accommodate all ages and price ranges, Newbury Street has something for everyone. Try Stephanie’s on Newbury for a meal with a view, or just take a walk along the street to soak up all its unique charm and ambiance.

Duck Tours:Take the Boston Duck Tours that take you to various popular tourist spots on both land and sea! Here you can explore a variety of destinations and capture beautiful photos without ever having to leave your seat.

Freedom Trail: For a one-of-a-kind history lesson, follow the freedom trail to see see 16 different historical sites. This 4 km walking trail includes museums, meetinghouses, and churches. Visitors can take a self-guided tour, or opt for a guided one depending on personal preference and time restraints.

Faneuil Hall: Located in the heart of downtown Boston, you can experience the marketplace that has been hosting shoppers since 1742. This eclectic urban marketplace lets you dine, shop, and even enjoy some of Boston’s best street performers all at once. Additionally, its location right across from the New England Aquarium allows you to see two prominent Boston attractions in one afternoon.

Museums: With its vast historic and academic roots, it is no wonder Boston holds a wide array of museums. The Boston Museum of Science features permanent and rotating exhibits exploring topics such as Cosmic Light and Nanotechnology. They also offer planetarium and IMAX shows.  For those who prefer art, the Boston Museum of Fine Arts has collections ranging from ancient Egypt to modern American, as well as everything in between. If neither of those options interests you, there are a multitude of other museums including the Boston Fire Museum, John F. Kennedy Presidential Museum and the USS Constitution Museum.

Boston

Transportation

MBTA

The Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority is an extremely popular form of transportation within the city of Boston. This system includes the subway, train, and bus lines. There are a number of passes that can be purchased for those who are only staying temporarily such as the 7-day Link Pass, which costs just $19 USD and includes unlimited traveling within the week.

Car Rentals

Cars can be rented near the airport from different companies such as Alamo, Avis, Budget, Dollar, Enterprise, and Hertz. Some of these companies also offer a pick-up service where they come pick you up and take you to the renting location to get your rental car. There are also other website such as Expedia, Kayak, and VroomVroomVroom that offer cheaper options from the same companies, so be sure to visit those if you choose to rent a car!

Rental Car Company

Telephone Number

Alamo Car Rental

(888) 826-6893

Avis Car Rental

(617) 568-6602

Budget Rental Car

(617) 568-6601

Dollar Rent A Car

(866) 434-2226

Enterprise Rent A Car

(617) 561-4488

Hertz Car Rental

(617) 568-5200

Biking

If you would like a cheaper option that also lets you get some exercise, consider biking in Boston! Boston prides itself on being a bike-friendly city, so regardless if you’re a beginner, intermediate, or expert biker, there are diverse routes for everyone. By using the bike-share system, you can rent a bike and take off. There are over 40 different locations at which bikes can be rented and once you’ve signed up, you can take it and go anywhere!

Taxis

Taxis are also an option for those who just want to get places conveniently without worrying about renting anything. Taxis can be easily found all around the city and there are a number of different taxi companies available -just make sure to use one with a Medallion on the cab so you don’t get a bad ride! The rates are consistent amongst all the taxi companies, the first 1/7 of a mile is $2.60 USD and every additional 1/7 of a mile will be $0.40 USD.