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18th International Conference of FFC - 7th International Symposium of ASFFBC

Functional and Medical Foods, Bioactive Compounds and Biomarkers:
Longevity and Quality of Life
November 17-18, 2015, Kobe University, Kobe, Japan

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Functional Food Center is pleased to announce its 18th International Conference "Functional and Medical Foods for Chronic Diseases: Bioactive Compounds and Biomarkers". The conference will be held at Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA on September 15-16, 2015. This conference will bring together experts in medicine, biology, and the food industry to discuss the functional foods with bioactive compounds as dietary interventions for chronic diseases.

Main Conference Topics/Sessions

Session: Functional Foods and Obesity

  • Epidemiology of obesity
  • The modern mechanisms of obesity; energy metabolism and obesity; neurobiological mechanisms of obesity; microbiological mechanisms of obesity; pathophysiologic mechanisms of obesity
  • Biomarkers of obesity
  • The effects of functional food and bioactive compounds on biomarkers of obesity

Session: Functional Foods and Diabetes

  • Epidemiology of diabetes
  • The modern mechanisms of diabetes
  • Biomarkers of diabetes
  • The effects of functional food and bioactive compounds on biomarkers of diabetes

Session: Functional Foods and Neurological Diseases

  • Epidemiology of mental and neurological diseases
  • Mechanisms of neurological diseases
  • Biomarkers of different mental and neurological diseases
  • The effects of functional food and bioactive compounds on biomarkers of neurological diseases
  • Functional foods for mental and neurological diseases 

Session: Functional Foods and Cardiovascular diseases (CVD)

  • Epidemiology of CVD
  • Biomarkers of different cardiovascular diseases
  • The effects of functional food and bioactive compounds on biomarkers of cardiovascular diseases

Session: Functional Foods and Cancer

  • Epidemiology of Cancer
  • Biomarkers of different types of cancer
  • The effects of functional food and bioactive compounds on biomarkers of different types of cancer

Session: Functional Foods/Nutraceuticals and Cancer. Session Chair: Jin-Rong Zhou, PhD, Associate Professor of Surgery, Harvard Medical School, Director, Nutrition/Metabolism Laboratory, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA.

Session: Bioactive Polysaccharides: Structures and Functional Properties. Session Chair: Steve Cui, PhD, Guelph Food Research Centre, Ontario, Canada

Session: Functional foods and other non-communicable diseases

Session: Medical foods with bioactive compound(s) for the management and prevention of non-     communicable diseases.

  • Medical food for diabetes
  • Medical foods for neurological diseases
  • Medical foods for CVD
  • The effects of medical food on biomarkers of non-communicable diseases

Session: Safety of the Bioactive Compounds and Functional Foods

  • Safety of the bioactive compounds at efficacious levels
  • Safety of the functional foods at efficacious levels
  • Regulatory issues and health claims

Session: Research and development of new functional food products for non-communicable diseases

Call for Abstracts:

The abstract submission deadline extended to July 31, 2015. The entire abstract should have a maximum of 650 words, up to three pages (including references). There is no up-front fee for submitting a conference abstract. Failure to register will result in an additional abstract publication fee of $49. First authors are expected to register, pay the conference fee, and present the paper (if submission is accepted). In the case of an emergency and the author(s) are unable to attend the conference, they are required to pay an abstract publication fee of $99. Decisions on selection will be promptly communicated to the authors via e-mail. All contributions will be reviewed, and accepted abstracts will be published in the conference proceedings book. Please email your abstract as an attachment to ffc_usa@sbcglobal.net. See our sample abstract.

There is no charge for the withdrawal of an abstract. In the case that the first author cannot attend the conference and present, he or she must contact the conference organizing committee via e-mail at ffc_usa@sbcglobal.net, to provide notification of withdrawal or to request a substitute presenter. Withdrawals must be received before July 31, 2015. 

Please note: Abstracts withdrawn after June 17, 2015, will be published and the first author will be expected to pay the abstract publication fee. The conference does not provide financial support nor registration fee waivers for any presentations.

To avoid the last-minute rush, submit your abstract in advance. Abstracts received by the Conference Organizing Committee after July 31, 2015 at 5 pm will not be accepted. For any information concerning publications please contact us ffc_usa@sbcglobal.net. For more information about abstract submission, click here.

Instructions for Poster Presenters:

Poster presentations allow the audience to get a clear visual of the presenters' work in a simple format. The reasonable size for posters is 2.5 - 3.0 feet high by 3.5 - 4 feet wide.

Poster Presentation Recommendations:

  1. The poster should clearly present the title, the author(s), affiliation(s), and a description of the research, along with highlighting the abstract's major elements.
  2. Remember that pictures, tables, and figures are key to any poster display.
  3. At least 50% of the surface area should be used for photos, graphs, or diagrams.
  4. Good use of color and the use of black or dark blue for text. Too much color can be hard to read!
  5. One or two large high-quality photographs attract attention.
  6. Make the title large and clear! Include author(s) name(s) and address(es). Your poster title should be easily readable from 3 - 4 meters away.
  7. We recommend the following sections on the poster: Abstract, Introduction, Methods, Tables, Figures, Results, and Conclusions.

For more information about poster sessions, please click here.

Registration Fees:

The registration fee will cover the Conference Proceedings book (Abstract book) and lunches and refreshments for two days. It will also cover a 12 month membership to the Academic Society for Functional Foods and Bioactive Compounds.

Cancellation Policy: Two months before conference: 75% refund; 45 days before conference: 50% refund; one month before conference: No refund. Reimbursements will be sent after the conference. Notice of cancellation of registration must be received in writing to the Conference Secretariat, at:  ffc_usa@sbcglobal.net. All refunds will be provided after the conference within 14 days.

You may click here to make a payment for the conference registration fee.

Conference registration fees are in USD (Early Bird Registration by May 17, 2015)

  Early Bird Registration ($) Standard Rate ($)
Full-Time Students* 295 345
USDA, NIH, FDA 395 495
Academic 495 645
Commercial 645 795
Exhibitor/Vendor 995 1295
Abstract Publication Fee 49 49


Please note: space at this conference is limited and will be allocated on a first come, first served basis.

Ticket

Paper Submission:

Abstract submission deadline: July 31, 2015. Full-text papers for oral presentations or posters should be submitted before July 17, 2015. Power Points for oral presentations should be submitted before August 27, 2015. Please send all documents to ffc_usa@sbcglobal.net.

* Please note that the program and sessions are subject to change 

For more information about the conference, please contact us by e-mail at ffc_usa@sbcglobal.net.   For international calls, please use: 469-441-8272, Toll free: 1-866-202-0487


Registration Form


Conference Organizing Committee

Co-chairman: Francine Welty, MD, PhD, Associate Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, Board-Certified Cardiologist at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA

Co-chairman: Garth L. Nicolson, PhD, Professor, President, Chief Scientific Officer and Research Professor of Molecular Pathology, The Institute for Molecular Medicine, S. Laguna Beach, CA, USA  (Garth Nicolson is the world's leading authority on cellular medicine, and author of more than 600 medical and scientific publications)

Co-chairman: Danik M. Martirosyan, PhD, Founder, Academic Society for Functional Foods and Bioactive Compounds, President, Functional Food Center/Functional Food Institute, Dallas, TX, USA

Jin-Rong Zhou, PhD, Associate Professor of Surgery, Harvard Medical School, Director, Nutrition/Metabolism Laboratory, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA

Antonia Ceccarelli, MD, PhD in Neurology, Harvard Medical School and Assistant Scientist at BWH, Boston, MA, USA

Nilanjana Maulik, Ph.D, Professor, Department of Surgery, University of Connecticut Medical Center, Farmington, CT, USA

Steve Cui, PhD, Guelph Food Research Centre, Ontario, Canada

Jing X. Kang, MD, PhD, Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and Director of the Laboratory for Lipid Medicine and Technology at Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA, United States

Hiroshi Yoshida, MD, PhD, Professor, Jikei University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan; Vice-President, Jikei University Kashiwa Hospital, Kashiwa, Chiba, Japan

Flavia Nery, PhD, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA

Fatemeh Malekian, PhD, Professor, Food Science, Southern University Agricultural Research and Extension Center, Baton Rouge LA, USA

George Perry, PhD, Dean and Professor, College of Sciences, University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, USA 

Francesco Marotta, MD, PhD, Professor, ReGenera Research Group for Aging Intervention, Milan, Italy; Montenapoleone Medical Center, Milano, Italy

Andrew Scholey, PhD, Prpfessor, Director of the Centre for Human Psychopharmacology  at Swinburne University, Melbourne, Austraia

Julius E. Oben, PhD. Professor, Laboratory of Nutrition and Nutritional Biochemistry, Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Yaounde 1, PO Box 812 Yaounde, Cameroon.


Main Conference Sessions/Topics

Session: Functional Foods and Obesity

  • Epidemiology of obesity
  • The modern mechanisms of obesity; energy metabolism and obesity; neurobiological mechanisms of obesity; microbiological mechanisms of obesity; pathophysiologic mechanisms of obesity
  • Biomarkers of obesity
  • The effects of functional food and bioactive compounds on biomarkers of obesity

Session: Functional Foods and Diabetes

  • Epidemiology of diabetes
  • The modern mechanisms of diabetes
  • Biomarkers of diabetes
  • The effects of functional food and bioactive compounds on biomarkers of diabetes

Session: Functional Foods and Neurological Diseases

  • Epidemiology of mental and neurological diseases
  • Mechanisms of neurological diseases
  • Biomarkers of different mental and neurological diseases
  • The effects of functional food and bioactive compounds on biomarkers of neurological diseases
  • Functional foods for mental and neurological diseases

Session: Functional Foods and Cardiovascular Diseases (CVD). Session Chair: Nilanjana Maulik PhD, Professor and Director, Department of Surgery, Molecular Cardiology and Angiogenesis Laboratory, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, Connecticut, USA

  • Epidemiology of CVD
  • Biomarkers of different cardiovascular diseases
  • The effects of functional food and bioactive compounds on biomarkers of cardiovascular diseases

Session: Functional Foods and Cancer. Session Chair: Garth L. Nicolson, PhD, Professor, President, Chief Scientific Officer and Research Professor of Molecular Pathology, The Institute for Molecular Medicine, S. Laguna Beach, CA, USA

  • Epidemiology of Cancer
  • Biomarkers of different types of cancer
  • The effects of functional food and bioactive compounds on biomarkers of different types of cancer

Session: Functional Foods/Nutraceuticals and Cancer. Session Chair: Jin-Rong Zhou, PhD, Associate Professor of Surgery, Harvard Medical School, Director, Nutrition/Metabolism Laboratory, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA

Session: Functional Foods/Nutrition and Metabolic disorders: Session Chair: Francine Welty, MD, PhD, Board-Certified Cardiologist at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and an Associate Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA

Session: Bioactive Polysaccharides: Structures and Functional Properties. Session Chair: Steve Cui, PhD, Guelph Food Research Centre, Ontario, Canada

Session: Functional Foods and other Non-Communicable Diseases

Session: Medical Foods with Bioactive Compound(s) for the Management and Prevention of Non- Communicable Diseases

  • Medical food for diabetes
  • Medical foods for Neurological diseases
  • Medical foods for CVD
  • The effects of medical food on biomarkers of non-communicable diseases

Session: Session: Safety of the Bioactive Compounds and Functional Foods

Session: Research and Development of New Functional Food Products for Non-Communicable Diseases. Session Chair: Danik M. Martirosyan, PhD, President, Functional Food Center/Functional Food Institute, Dallas, TX, USA

Session: Poster Presentations

Panel discussion: Safety of the Bioactive Compounds at Efficacious Levels

Panelists:

Awards and Membership Certificate (Membership for Academic Society of Functional Foods and Bioactive Compounds)


Sample Abstract

Diacylglycerol for obesity: serotonin hypothesis

Hidekatsu Yanai 1, Hiroshi Yoshida 2, 3, Yuji Hirowatari 4, and Norio Tada 

1Department of Internal Medicine, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Kohnodai Hospital, Chiba, 21567-0345, Japan; 2Department of Laboratory Medicine, Jikei University School of Medicine, Chiba, 31567-0345, Japan; 3Internal Medicine of Metabolism and Nutrition, Jikei University Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba, 41567-0345, Japan; 4Bioscience Division, TOSOH Corp, Kanagawa, 51567-0345, Japan 

Keywords: diacylglycerol, intestine, obesity, serotonin, thermogenesis

Background: Diacylglycerol (DAG) oil is a natural component of various edible oils. DAG has been reported to prevent obesity through a variety of potential mechanisms in comparison with triacylglycerol (TAG) in humans. An increase in postprandial energy expenditure (EE) is proposed to be one of the mechanisms underlying this effect of DAG. Up-regulated mRNA expressions associated with EE by DAG in the small intestine may explain increased postprandial EE. The small intestine seems to contribute to changes in EE by DAG. We previously studied plasma serotonin, which is mostly present in the small intestine and mediates sympathetic thermogenesis. We found that DAG ingestion increases plasma serotonin levels by approximately 50% compared to TAG ingestion. 

Objective: To understand the molecular mechanisms for DAG-induced increase in serotonin and EE, we investigated effects of DAG on serotonin release and expressions of genes associated with EE, using the human intestinal cell line.

Methods: The intestinal cell line, the Caco-2 cells, was incubated with medium containing 1-monoacylglycerol (1-monooleyglycerol [1-MOG]) and 2-monoacylglycerol (2-monooleylglycerol [2-MOG]), distinctive digestive products of DAG and TAG, respectively. We measured serotonin release from the Caco-2 cells using a newly developed high-performance liquid chromatography. Further, we studied effects of 1-MOG, 2-MOG, and serotonin on expressions of mRNA associated with EE (acyl-CoA oxidase [ACO], medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase [MCAD], fatty acid translocase [FAT], and uncoupling protein-2 [UCP-2]), by the Real-Time quantitative RT-PCR system.

Results: 100 mM 1-MOG significantly increased serotonin release from the Caco-2 cells compared with the same concentration of 2-MOG by approximately 37% (P<0.001). Expressions of mRNA of ACO, FAT, and UCP-2 were significantly higher in 100 mM 1-MOG-treated Caco-2 cells than 100 mM 2-MOG-treaed cells by approximately 13%, 24%, and 35%, respectively. Expressions of mRNA of ACO, MCAD, FAT, and UCP-2 were significantly increased in 400 nM serotonin-treated Caco-2 cells as compared with the Caco-2 cells incubated without serotonin by approximately 29%, 30%, and 39%, respectively.

Conclusion: Our study demonstrated that a hydrolytic product of DAG increases serotonin release from the intestinal cells and enhances expressions of genes associated with b-oxidation (ACO, MCAD), thermogenesis (UCP-2) and fatty acids metabolism (FAT). Furthermore, this study revealed that serotonin also enhances expression of these genes, proposing a new molecular biological mechanism for DAG-mediated anti-obesity effect. Serotonin may play an important role in DAG-mediated prevention of obesity.

(Please note: the portion below will not appear in the published abstract)

18th International Conference

Corresponding Author: Hidekatsu Yanai, PhD, Professor, Department of Internal Medicine, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Kohnodai Hospital, Chiba, 01567-0345, Japan, e-mailhy@gmal.com, phone number: (001) 469-441-8272, secondary phone: (866) 464-6955

Main Presenting Author: Hidekatsu Yanai, PhD, Professor, Department of Internal Medicine, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Kohnodai Hospital, Chiba, 01567-0345, Japan, e-mail: hy@gmal.com, phone number: (001) 469-441-8272, secondary phone: (866) 464-6955

Co-authors:

Hiroshi Yoshida, MD, PhD, e-mail: hyoshida@gmal.com

Yuji Hirowatari, PhD, e-mail: yhir@gmal.com

Norio Tada, MS, e-mail: mtada@gmal.com

Presentation Type (please choose one): Oral or poster

Main Conference Topics (please choose one): Choose one from the conference website


Abstract Submission 

  • Title
  • Author(s) – do not include degree acronyms (i.e., BS, MS, PhD, etc)
  • Primary Institution/Laboratory Name, City, State, and Country
  • The body of abstract    

3. The body of abstract should contain the following sections:

  • Keywords 
  • Background
  • Methods
  • Results
  • Conclusions

4. Abstracts cannot contain the following:

  • Brand names
  • Advertisements. Research abstracts should be free from solicitations and should not contain demonstrations of products for the purpose of sales. Exhibitor’s tables are available for the purpose of advertisement and sales.   

5. Abstracts can either contain one picture, one graph, or one table.

  • A graph or table must be embedded into the abstract and cannot exceed 1/3 of the page
  • Any graph or table must pertain to the abstract, for the purpose of visualizing data, and must be referred to in the text of the abstract
  • Pictures, tables and graphs should be no bigger than 4 1/2 in. (W) x 4 1/2 in. (L)
  • Keep in mind that all images will be displayed in black and white in the book

6. Please also provide the following information:

  • Corresponding author(s)

  • Primary/Presenting author's name

  • Primary author's professional mailing address, e-mail address, and phone number

  • Desired presentation format (i.e. oral, poster)

  • Session name

  • Co-authors e-mail addresses  

  • Please send the abstract by e-mail attachment to: ffc_usa@sbcglobal.net

Click here for the sample abstract


Poster Session

Conference Poster Presentations: Poster presentations give the audience a clear visual of the presenter's work in a simple format. The reasonable size for posters is 2.5-3.0 feet high by 3.5-4 feet wide.

Poster presentation recommendations:

  1. The poster should present the title, the author(s), affiliation(s), and a description of the research, along with highlighting the abstract's major elements.

  2. Minimize detail and try to use simple statements. Keep it short and easy to read.

  3. Remember that pictures, tables, and figures are key to any poster display.

  4. If possible, use color in your visuals.

  5. Don't overwhelm the audience with excessive information. Instead, construct a poster display that enhances the presentation.

  6. At least 50% of the surface area should be used for photos, graphs and diagrams.

  7. Use a clear structure and organized layout.

  8. Use complementary colors, and black or dark blue for text. Too much color can be hard to read!

  9. One or two large, high-quality photographs attract attention.

  10. Your title should be a condensed statement of the main idea of your poster, and the title should be large and clear.

  11. Your poster title should be easily readable from 3-4 meters away.  Include author(s) name(s) and address(es).

  12. We recommend the following sections on the poster: Abstract, Introduction, Methods, Tables, Figures, Results, and Conclusions.


Guidelines for full paper submission for the functional food conference at Harvard Medical School from September 15-16, 2015

All participants with accepted abstracts may write full articles/papers. Please note that this is mandatory for all oral presenters. 

1. The entire text of the full papers must be in Times New Roman, 12 point size font.

2. Full paper margins should be 0.75 inches from the top and bottom and 1.0 inch from the left and right for A4 format paper.

3. Line spacing should be 1.15 and alignment justified.

4. The submitted full papers should contain no less than 6 and no more than 16 pages. A shorter or longer manuscript must be discussed with the organizing committee.

5. When submitting a full paper, corresponding author should send a cover letter, indicating that authors have not submitted a similar manuscript for publication elsewhere. Full papers submitted without cover letter will not be published.

6. The full papers and cover letter should be submitted as separate attachments to the following email address: ffc_usa@sbcglobal.net.

7. The full paper submission deadline is 2 months following the date in the abstract acceptance letter but no later than the date mentioned on the conference website.

8. Full papers will be published in FFC’s Journal of Functional Foods in Health and Disease. 

Please download and use the suggested samples for an original scientific paper, review paper, and cover letter. 

Sample for Research Paper

Sample for Review Paper

Sample for Cover Letter Form


Exhibitors Information

All vendors have a separate exhibitor table at the conference.  The two tables will be located near the conference area and will have sufficient access to conference participants. The international conference will attract many experts from food processing companies, universities, research centers, and related industries from around the world, such as local restaurants and bakeries. This will be a great opportunity to introduce yourself to many international organizations. The cost for vendors is $1295.00, which includes one (1) full registration for the conference.

There is a limited amount of space. Please purchase your conference registration ticket and provide your company description, which will appear on the conference website with your sponsorship level, or exhibit booth, listed alongside a hyperlink to your website. Limit the company description to no more than 35 words.

You can fill out the registration form and make a payment for the registration fee to become a vendor for this International Conference. An email confirmation will be sent within two days of the submission date.

If you have any questions, feel free to email us at ffc_usa@sbcglobal.net 


Sponsorship Opportunities

Dear Future Sponsor,

I wish to inform you about an excellent sponsorship opportunity for your company to gain high-quality exposure in the health food industry. Functional foods and bioactive compounds are currently receiving an increased amount of attention from the scientific community and the public. The Functional Food Center’s 18th International Conference will be held at Harvard Medical School, BostonMassachusetts, USA. It will be timely in presenting new and relevant information focused on the importance of bioactive compounds and  functional foods.

Harvard Medical School, Boston

Since 1998, the Functional Food Center has been a pioneer in the functional food industry. It combines cutting-edge expertise in the biomedical sciences with practical business experience in order to aid in further research, development, and commercialization of functional food innovations in both domestic and international markets. The Functional Food Center connects a global network of professionals (scientists, functional food experts, and food industry representatives) to an environment conducive to innovative research collaboration. Since 2004, the FFC has organized conferences together with top universities. Scientists, researchers, and food industry professionals present their research and discoveries about healthy, functional, and medical foods with bioactive compounds. In response to the growth of this field, we are proud to introduce the Academic Society for Functional Foods and Bioactive Compounds. This society of medical doctors, scientists, dietitians, nutritionists and other food and medical industry professionals will be strictly dedicated to the research and development of functional and medical foods, bioactive compounds, and the discovery of new ingredients.  

Partnering with the Functional Food Center through the sponsorship of our upcoming conference will provide your company with several valuable benefits. These include but are not limited to: 

1) Your names and logos endlessly stay on our website, which has 4800 visitors per month, and have an opening rate of 13% for the newsletter. 

2) Your logo will be included in the conference website, promotional materials, and Functional Food Center’s bi-monthly newsletter, which is received by over 450,000 subscribers including scientists, medical doctors, nutritionists and dieticians.

3) FDA, USDA, and NIH representatives attend our conferences, and you may contact them directly at the time of conference. 

4) An option for annual and lifetime sponsorship. 

5) Each level of sponsorship will contain a certain number of attendee rights, which allow free-of-charge admission to our conference.

6) You will have the unique opportunity to meet with decision makers in this field, receive information/support on how to make a new, healthy product, and provide oral presentations about a related topic.

7) The Academic Society for Functional Foods and Bioactive Compounds and Functional Food Center can advise you on how to create a new, healthy and functional product (this can be a separate discussion). 

We look forward hearing from you. 

Sincerely, 

Danik M. Martirosyan, PhD 

President of Academic Society for Functional Foods and Bioactive Compounds,

Founder of Functional Food Center, Inc. 

Sponsorship Prospectus 

Please join us for an exciting opportunity! 

We are pleased to invite you to a conference in Boston, Massachusetts on September 15-16, 2015.

The Functional Food Center, The Journal of Functional Foods in Health and Disease (in Dallas, Texas, USA) would be honored for you to join us at our conference. We will bring together experts in medicine, biology and the food industry to discuss the contribution of functional/medical foods and bioactive compounds in the prevention and management of chronic diseases. 

With over 120 expected participants, the conference provides a great opportunity to increase the visibility of your company and exhibit products and services to an international group of researchers, clinicians, post-docs and next-generation scientists. 

Sponsors and exhibitors will be exposed to a wide audience and will have many promotional opportunities. 

Below are details regarding the sponsorship and exhibitor packages. We hope you find the right package for your needs, hope to see you in Germany, and look forward to collaborating with you in the future. 

Since 2004, the Functional Food Center has organized conferences where scientists, researchers, and food industry professionals present their discoveries in the realm of functional foods and bioactive compounds. 

The Conference Organizing Committee is pleased to announce the 18th International Conference of FFC - 6th International Symposium of ASFFBC. It will be held at the Harvard Medical School on   September 15-16, 2015.

The Functional Food Center is a valuable resource for businesses in the food industry. The benefits of sponsorship include, but are not limited to:

  • Developing various connections through conference participation, such as medical doctors, food scientists, food industry representatives, dieticians and nutritionists.
  • Information on the latest research and discoveries in the realm of functional foods and bioactive compounds in order to develop, market and commercialize healthy products.
  • The ability (if eligible) to gain recognition in the food industry by joining our board of Medical and Food Industry Experts.

Sponsorship funding goes to support conference organization and conference promotion. We are also willing to work with companies interested in specifically sponsoring student registration, student travel, international scientist travel, conference lunches, conference receptions, or abstract book publication. 

Co-Chairman: Danik M. Martirosyan, PhD, Founder, Academic Society for Functional Foods and Bioactive Compounds; President, Functional Food Center, Inc. 

Sponsorship Levels and Benefits:

Sponsorship Type / Benefit

Diamond Platinum Gold Silver Bronze
Sponsorships Available 1 2 3 6 No Limit
Cost $40,000 $20,000 $10,000 $5,000 $2,500
Attendee Rights 5 Free 4 Free 3 Free 2 Free 1 Free
Lifetime Sponsorship  Yes
Annual Sponsorship Yes Yes    
*Display Table Yes Yes Yes Yes  
Logo Included in Conference Website Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Logo Included in Promotional Materials Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Acknowledgement in Abstract Book Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Distribution of Company Brochure Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
**Conduct Special Session Yes Yes Yes
***Logo Included in Newsletters Yes Yes Yes
Logo Displayed in Meeting Room Yes Yes
****Advertisement in Abstract Book Yes (1 Page) Yes (1 Page) Yes (1/2 Page)
Logo Included on Conference Folder Yes Yes
Signage Rights Yes


*At each conference, an area is reserved for exhibitors. However, because our conferences are held at universities, space is limited. Therefore registration is on a first-come, first-served basis.

**Your company may conduct their own special session regarding a specific topic of your choice at the conference. This is an excellent way to connect with possible collaborates with similar interests.

***Your company’s logo will be included (and linked to your company website) in our bi-monthly Functional Foods in Health and Disease Journal newsletter. It has over 400,000 subscribers including scientists, medical doctors, dietitians and nutritionists. The logo will also be included in our newsletter for the Academic Society of Functional Foods and Bioactive Compounds, which has over 2,000 members.


****In addition to the acknowledgement, Gold sponsors will receive a ½ page of advertising space in the abstract book, and both platinum and diamond sponsors will receive a full page of advertising space. This is a great way to promote your company and its products.

If you have any questions or need additional information, please contact us.

Options Benefits Cost

Sponsorship for Scientific 

Sponsorship for Scientific Sessions

(4 available)

Sponsor recognition at the beginning of the scientific session

Sponsor name and logo will be included in the conference program, abstract book and websites

 

Name/logo will be included in every upcoming newsletter to more than 400,000 readers including medical doctors, scientists, etc.

$5,000 each

Social Activities Welcome Reception

(1 available)

Sponsor recognition by room signage

Sponsor name and logo will be included in the conference program and abstract book and websites

$4,500 partial

$9,000 exclusive

Badges and Lanyards Sponsor name and logo will be included in the conference program and abstract book and websites $2,000 exclusive
Pens Sponsor name and logo will be included in the conference program and abstract book and websites $2,000 exclusive
Bags Sponsor name and logo will be included in the conference program and abstract book and websites $2,000 exclusive

Lanyards, Pens, Badges and Bags

Sponsor name and logo will be included in the conference program and abstract book and websites

Name/logo will be included in every upcoming newsletter to more than 400,000 readers including medical doctors, scientists, etc.

$5,000 each

Conference Book Advertisement

The sponsor can place one (1) full-page advertisement (black and white) at the end of the conference program and abstract book

Sponsor name and logo will be included in the conference program and abstract book and websites

$1,000
Exhibitors

Provided with one table close to the conference area with sufficient access to coneference participants

Company description on FFC website

Includes one (1) full registration admission

$1,195
Lunches (2 available)

Name/logo will be included in every upcoming newsletter to more than 400,000 readers including medical doctors, scientists, etc.

One lunch per day; two lunches over two days

Sponsor name and logo will be included in the conference program and abstract book and websites

$2,000 per day

$3,500 exclusive

Daily Tea and Coffee Breaks

(5 available)

Five breaks over three days 

Sponsor name and logo will be included in the conference program and abstract book and websites

Name/logo will be included in every upcoming newsletter to more than 400,000 readers including medical doctors, scientists, etc.

$1,000 per day 

$4,000 exclusive

Banquet (1 available) $6,000

Terms of Agreement
  1. Sponsorship will be awarded on a first-come, first-serve basis.  Sponsorship will not be reserved until full payment is received.
  2. The sponsor is responsible for all materials, printing, customization and shipping-related costs associated with supplying the logo materials to FFC.

Our Partners/Sponsors

logoSponsor4

logoSponsor2

Technology Networks

Regenera


Venue and Accommodation

The conference will take place at Harvard Medical School on September 15 & 16, 2015. We are offering hotel rooms throughout the weekend at the Inn at Longwood Medical, a popular hotel that is a quick 7 minute walk away from Harvard Medical School. Please read on to find more information regarding the venue, hotel, and possible places to visit while staying in Boston!

Venue

Harvard Medical School

Established in 1636, Harvard University is one of the most prestigious and widely respected universities in the world. Harvard is recognized as the oldest university in the United States, and has maintained unparalleled influence in all areas of academia. It has produced alumni ranging from Nobel Prize winner T.S. Eliot, to current U.S. President Barack Obama.  In the campus' 5,038 acres, there are 12 degree-granting schools offering concentrations in various studies, such as business, engineering, law and education. One of the most notable schools Harvard offers, however, is the esteemed Harvard Medical School. As the United States’ top research medical school, Harvard Medical School has produced 15 Nobel Prize recipients since its establishment in 1782. For over 200 years, Harvard Medical School has been the capital for innovations, advancements and achievements in the medical field, making it the ideal venue to host the 2015 Functional Foods Conference.

The Conference will be held at the Joseph B. Martin Conference Center (77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston, MA) at Harvard Medical School. Please refer to the campus map for directions. If you have general question about conference room location, direction, etc., please call conference center at 617-432-8990.

Cambridge, Massachusetts

Harvard University is conveniently located in the historic city of Cambridge, Massachusetts, just 20 minutes outside Boston. In your free time, you can take the opportunity to visit and explore the many attractions Boston has to offer.

Accommodations: Hotel and Stay

The Inn at Longwood Medical

This family-owned hotel provides spacious guest rooms and suites designed to maximize comfort and provide visitors with modern amenities, including free Wi-Fi, free coffee and tea, free cable TV, and an extended bathroom. The hotel is located within walking distance of the Harvard Medical Center, where the conference will be held. It is also within walking distance to the T (Boston’s subway transportation), for easy travel to downtown Boston. If you prefer to stay around the area, there are many different restaurants located near the hotel, including the hotel’s own bar and grill. Brookline and Fenway are two popular neighborhoods within walking distance from the Inn that offer plenty of shopping, dining, and nightlife. The close proximity to Harvard Medical Center, along with many other research labs and facilities, make the Longwood Medical the ideal place to lodge during this symposium.

342 Longwood Avenue

The Inn at Longwood Medical      

342 Longwood Avenue

Boston, MA 02115

Price per night: $219 USD + tax

Conference Reservations:

Individual attendees will make reservations for the event directly with the hotel at 1-(800)-468-2378 or (617)-731-4700.  You can also visit the hotel’s website and under “Reservations” you can fill out the boxes that say “Best Rate Guarantee” and enter the group code: FFCC0914

Cut-Off-Date:

The Inn at Longwood Medical agrees to hold your room until the CUT-OFF DATE of August 14, 2015.  At the cut-off date, the hotel will review the reservations for the event and release the unreserved rooms for general customers. For the attendees that missed the deadline, the hotel will determine whether or not it can accept reservations based on a space-and rate-availability determined from the group rate after the cut-off date.

Directions from Boston Logan International Airport:

For those who are driving:

  • Merge onto I-90 West
  • Take exit 24 for 1-93, merge onto Thomas P. O’Neil Jr. Tunnel and merge onto I-93 North
  • Take exit 26 toward Storrow Drive, keep right at the fork and continue onto MA-28
  • Continue onto Storrow Drive and take the exit on the left toward Charlesgate, take a left
  • Continue onto Boylston Street
  • Turn right onto Park Drive
  • Take the first left onto Brookline Avenue
  • Turn left onto Longwood Avenue à The Inn at Longwood Medical will be on your right

Information for those arriving from other locations can be found here.

Walking directions from the Hotel to the Conference can be found here.
Tourism

Boston

Boston is one of America’s oldest cities. Since 1822, it served as the economic and cultural hub of New England. Over 617,000 residents inhabit this city and millions more visit each year for the chance to immerse themselves in Boston’s rich history and vibrant culture. Home to many world-class educational institutions such as Harvard University, Boston College, Berklee College of Music, and MIT, the Boston area is a mecca for academic excellence. In addition, Boston boasts  some of the best inpatient hospitals in the world. Through museums, nightlife, restaurants, and sports teams, Boston offers all the amenities and excitement of a modern metropolitan city, while managing to maintain its welcoming atmosphere and historic roots.

Places to Visit

Newbury Street: Boston’s most captivating street offers eight blocks of world-renowned restaurants, coffee shops, nightlife, and shopping. With a wide variety of destinations that accommodate all ages and price ranges, Newbury Street has something for everyone. Try Stephanie’s on Newbury for a meal with a view, or just take a walk along the street to soak up all its unique charm and ambiance.

Duck Tours: Feeling lazy? Take the Boston Duck Tours that take you to various popular tourist spots on both land and sea! Here you can explore a variety of destinations and capture beautiful photos without ever having to leave your seat.

Freedom Trail: For a one-of-a-kind history lesson, follow the freedom trail to see see 16 different historical sites. This 4 km walking trail includes museums, meetinghouses, and churches. Visitors can take a self-guided tour, or opt for a guided one depending on personal preference and time restraints.

Faneuil Hall: Located in the heart of downtown Boston, you can experience the marketplace that has been hosting shoppers since 1742. This eclectic urban marketplace lets you dine, shop, and even enjoy some of Boston’s best street performers all at once. Additionally, its location right across from the New England Aquarium allows you to see two prominent Boston attractions in one afternoon.

Museums: With its vast historic and academic roots, it is no wonder Boston holds a wide array of museums. The Boston Museum of Science features permanent and rotating exhibits exploring topics such as Cosmic Light and Nanotechnology. They also offer planetarium and IMAX shows.  For those who prefer art, the Boston Museum of Fine Arts has collections ranging from ancient Egypt to modern American, as well as everything in between. If neither of those options interests you, there are a multitude of other museums including the Boston Fire Museum, John F. Kennedy Presidential Museum and the USS Constitution Museum.

Transportation

MBTA

The Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority is an extremely popular form of transportation within the city of Boston. This system includes the subway, train, and bus lines. There are a number of passes that can be purchased for those who are only staying temporarily such as the 7-day Link Pass, which costs just $19 USD and includes unlimited traveling within the week.

Car Rentals

Cars can be rented near the airport from different companies such as Alamo, Avis, Budget, Dollar, Enterprise, and Hertz. Some of these companies also offer a pick-up service where they come pick you up and take you to the renting location to get your rental car. There are also other website such as Expedia, Kayak, and VroomVroomVroom that offer cheaper options from the same companies, so be sure to visit those if you choose to rent a car!

Rental Car Company

Telephone Number

Alamo Car Rental

(888) 826-6893

Avis Car Rental

(617) 568-6602

Budget Rental Car

(617) 568-6601

Dollar Rent A Car

(866) 434-2226

Enterprise Rent A Car

(617) 561-4488

Hertz Car Rental

(617) 568-5200

Biking

If you would like a cheaper option that also lets you get some exercise, consider biking in Boston! Boston prides itself on being a bike-friendly city, so regardless if you’re a beginner, intermediate, or expert biker, there are diverse routes for everyone. By using the bike-share system, you can rent a bike and take off. There are over 40 different locations at which bikes can be rented and once you’ve signed up, you can take it and go anywhere!

Taxis

Taxis are also an option for those who just want to get places conveniently without worrying about renting anything. Taxis can be easily found all around the city and there are a number of different taxi companies available -just make sure to use one with a Medallion on the cab so you don’t get a bad ride! The rates are consistent amongst all the taxi companies, the first 1/7 of a mile is $2.60 USD and every additional 1/7 of a mile will be $0.40 USD.

Payment Options

When using a bank transfer to make the payment, you are required to send an email after making the payment, to ffc_usa@sbcglobal. The email must include the following information: date of transfer, amount, invoice number, and name of remitter.

When paying your fee with a check, make sure that all checks are made out to Functional Food Center and use US dollars. If you are using a check outside of the United States, please talk to your bank about whether the check will be accepted in the United States’ banks. Any fees that are applicable to international checks will be deducted from the payment, and may result in an incomplete registration. Checks must be mailed to 7575 Frankford Road, Suite 3527, Dallas, Texas 75252, United States. An email will be sent confirming that the FFC received payment.

If you have any questions regarding the payment options for the conference, please contact us.

Buy Your Tickets


Conference Program

September 15, 2015

8:30-9:00 Registration

9:00-9:05 Welcome to Harvard Medical School

9:05-9:25 Conference Opening

Session: Functional Foods and Obesity. Session Chair: Francine Welty, MD, PhD, Board-Certified Cardiologist at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and an Associate Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.

9:25 - 9:50 Harry G. Preuss, MD, Departments of Biochemistry, Medicine and Pathology, Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC, USA. Lowering circulating glucose levels that are in the non-diabetic range is important for long-term optimal health

9:50 - 10:15 Haleama Al Sabbah, PhD, Assistant Professor, Department of Public Health Nutrition, UAE. Prevalence of overweight, obesity, anemia, and their associations with dietary habits among female students at Zayed University, UAE

10:15 - 10:40 Fatemeh Malekian, PhD, Professor, Food Science, Southern University Agricultural Research and Extension Center, Baton Rouge LA, USA. The effects of whey protein and resistant starch on body weight

10:40 - 10:55 Coffee Break

Session: Functional Foods and Neurological Disorders. Session Chair: Andrew Scholey, PhD, Professor, Australia, Professor, Swinburne University, Australia

10:55 - 11:20 Andrew Pipingas, Associate Professor, Head of Neurocognitive Ageing Research, Centre for Human Psychopharmacology (CHP) School of Health Sciences, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Victoria, Australia. Long chain omega-3 supplementation and neurocognition in healthy adults: efficacy, mechanisms of action and methodological considerations

11:20-11:40 Sana Ben Othman, PhD Student, United Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Gifu University, Japan. Neuroprotective effect of sesame seed water-soluble fraction: antioxidant and anti-apoptotic mechanisms

12:00 - 12:25 Jianmin Chen, PhD, Department of Cell Biology and Neuroscience, Rutgers University, USA. Glutamine has significant therapeutic potential for ataxia telangiectasia: preclinical observations in ATM-deficient mice

12:25 - 12:50 Andrew Scholey, PhD, Professor, Swinburne University, Australia. A role for dietary polyphenols as cognitive enhancers

12:50 -13:50 Lunch

Session: Functional Foods for Chrobic Diseases (CVD, Cancer, and other Chronic Diseases), Session chair: Jin-Rong Zhou, PhD, Associate Professor of Surgery, Nutrition/Metabolism Laboratory, Department of Surgery, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston MA, USA

13:50-14:25 Nancy J. Emenaker, PhD, R.D.N., Program Director and Project Officer, Nutritional Sciences Research Group, Division of Cancer Prevention, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland. Developing food-specific molecular profiles and biomarkers of food and nutrient intake, and dietary exposure for reducing cancer risks

14:25 - 14:50 Francesco Marotta, MD, PhD, Chief Scientific Officer of ReGenera Research Group for Aging Intervention, Milano and Chief Medical Officer, Gender Healthy Aging Unit, Montenapoleone Medical Center, Italy. A novel sturgeon-based marine nutraceutical in inflammatory- and stress-related disorders: preliminary pilot study in cancer patients

14:50 - 15:00 Coffee Break

15:00 - 15:25 Hisham R. Ibrahim, Ph.D., Professor, Department of Biochemistry & Biotechnology, Faculty of Agriculture, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima, Japan. Novel bioactive peptides from honey with therapeutic potential for treatment of oxidative stress-related diseases

15:25 - 15:45 Ying Zhu, PhD, School of Agricultural, Food and Wine, University of Adelaide, Glen Osmond, Australia. Australia.Bio-functional effects of almond by-products: Almond hull and almond skin on rat epithelial cells and human colon cancer cells

15:45 - 16:10 Jin-Rong Zhou, PhD, Associate Professor of Surgery, Nutrition/Metabolism Laboratory, Department of Surgery, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston MA, USA. Bioassay-guided identification of novel anti-cancer bioactive ingredients in black tea

Session: Bioactive Polysaccharides: Structures and Functional Properties. Session Chair: Steve Cui, PhD, Guelph Food Research Centre, Ontario, Canada.

16:10 - 16:30 Ming-Yong Xie, Professor, Vice President of Nanchang University. State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, Nanchang University, China. Study on structure and immunoregulatory activity of polysaccharides from food resources

16:30 - 16:50 Shao-Ping Nie, PhD, Professor, State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, Nanchang University, China. In vitro and in vivo studies on digestion and fermentation of polysaccharide from seeds of Plantago asiatica L. with its beneficial effects on intestinal health

16:50 - 17:15 Steve Cui, PhD, Guelph Food Research Centre, Ontario, Canada. Bioactive polysaccharides: structures and functional properties

17:15 Closing

September 16, 2015

Session: Functional Foods and Diabetes. Session Chair: Fatemeh Malekian, PhD, Professor, Food Science, Southern University Agricultural Research and Extension Center, Baton Rouge LA, USA

9:00 - 9:20 Debasis Bagchi, PhD, Department of Pharmacological and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Houston College of Pharmacy, Houston, TX, USA, and Cepham Research Center, Piscataway, NJ, USA. Safety and effficacy of a novel Trigonella foenum-graceum seed extract (FenfuroTM) and green coffee bean extract (GCB70TM) in attenuating the symptoms of insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome

9:20 - 9:40 Chinagorom Asinobi, PhD, Professor, Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Imo State University, Owerri. Effect of commonly consumed traditional fortified staple meals on the postprandial and random blood glucose responses of undergraduate students

9:40 - 10:00 Nurudeen Hassan, PhD Student, Cardiff School of Health Sciences, Cardiff Metropolitan University, Cardiff, United Kingdom. A methanolic extract of Trigonella foenum graecum seeds regulates markers of macrophage polarization

10:00 - 10:15 Kuhu Roy, PhD Student, Department of Foods and Nutrition, the Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda, India. Tinospora cordifolia stem supplementation in diabetic dyslipidemia: an open labelled randomized controlled trial

10:15 - 10:30 Md. Moklesur Rahman Sarker, PhD, Associate Professor and Head, Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Lincoln University College, Petaling Jaya, Malaysia. Antihyperglycemic activity of dietary mushrooms (Reishi, Shiitake and Oyster) on alloxan- and glucocorticoid-induced diabetic Long-Evans rats

10:30 - 10:40 Coffee Break

Session: Definition of Functional Foods. Nutraceutical, Functional and Medical Food Regulations. Session Chair: Debasis Bagchi, PhD, Professor, University of College of Pharmacy, Houston, TX, USA

10:40 - 11:05 Danik M. Martirosyan, PhD, President, Functional Food Center, Dallas, TX, USA. A new definition of functional food by FFC: what makes a new definition unique?

11:05 - 11:30 Bruce P. Burnett, PhD, Vice President of Compliance, Regulatory and Medical Affairs, Entera Health, Inc., USA. Current International Legal and Regulatory Environment for Medicinal Foods

11:30 - 11:55 Debasis Bagchi, PhD, Department of Pharmacological and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of College of Pharmacy, Houston, TX, USA. Nutraceutical and functional food regulations in the United States with a special emphasis on GRAS (Generally Recognized as Safe) status and label claims

Session: Research and Development of new Functional Food Products for Non-Communicable Diseases. Session chair: Danik M. Martirosyan, PhD, President, Functional Food Center, Dallas, TX, USA.

11:55 - 12:20 Janos Zempleni, PhD, Professor, Department of Nutrition and Health Sciences, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE, USA. Depletion of dietary microRNAs from cow’s milk decreases fecundity in mice

12:20 -13:30 Lunch

13:30 - 13:55 Young Chul Kim, PhD, Professor of Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea. An alteration in cytochrome P450 enzymes in liver steatosis induced by intake of a high-carbohydrate/ fat-free diet after food deprivation and its pharmacological significance

13:55 - 14:20 Abraham Amlogu, PhD, University of Westminster, London, UK. A comparative study: Long and short term effect of a nutrition sensitive approach to delay the progression of HIV to AIDS among People Living with HIV (PLWH) in Nigeria

14:20 - 14:45 Manoj K. Bhasin, PhD, Department of Medicine, Division of Interdisciplinary Medicine and Biotechnology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. Insilico identification of herbal formaulation for IBD management using systems biology approach

14:45-15:10 Garth Nicolson, PhD, Professor, Emeritus, Department of Molecular Pathology, The Institute for Molecular Medicine, Huntington Beach, CA. USA. Lipid Replacement with a membrane glycerolphospholipid formulation: enhancement of human spermatozoa motility and viability

15:10 - 15:20 Coffee Break

15:20 - 16:20 Session: Poster Presentations

16:20 - 17:00 Panel Discussion: Safety of the Bioactive Compounds at Efficacious Levels

Moderator: Bruce P. Burnett, PhD, Vice President of Compliance, Regulatory and Medical Affairs, Entera Health, Inc., USA

Panelists: Hisham R. Ibrahim, PhD, Professor; Danik Martirosyan, PhD; Jin-Rong Zhou, PhD; Debasis Bagchi, PhD, Professor; Francesco Marotta MD, PhD, and Garth Nicolson, PhD, Professor

17:00 - 17:15 Awards and Membership Certificates (Membership for Academic Society of Functional Foods and Bioactive Compounds)

17:15 - 17:30 Conference Closing

* Please note that the program and sessions are subject to change

For more information about the conference, please contact us by e-mail at ffc_usa@sbcglobal.net. For international calls, please use: 469-441-8272, Toll free: 1-866-202-0487