Functional Food Center

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Functional Food Certification Course

FFC’s mission

Education about functional food science and its application to everyday life is an important aspect of the Functional Food Center. We are proud to announce two new courses on the fundamental features of functional food science. These courses will correspond to the textbooks “Introduction to Functional Food Science” and “Functional Foods for Chronic Disease.” This course will provide training and certification for professionals and students in the food and nutrition field. The goal of the course is to provide information and application to participants so they are able to share their knowledge with clients and customers as well as apply to the field of study.

How can it benefit your career?

Dietitians & Nutritionists

FFC Certification will provide current functional food research to use in the workplace. Enhance your career opportunities with the latest knowledge in functional foods. You will be introduced to biochemical compounds, the essential nutrients that provide the medicinal properties.  You will gain the unique ability to create a medicinal meal plan of functional foods for your patient or client while receiving continuing education credits.

Food & Nutrition Students

FFC Certification will help advance career opportunities by providing evidence in the medicinal properties of bioactive compounds found in functional foods.  Learn first hand on how bioactive compounds support optimal health, wellness, and disease prevention. You can then bring information to future employers to use in the production of new functional foods or to make meal plans.

Food and Nutrition Professors

This course provides you with the qualification to teach an introductory course on functional foods at a university or accredited institution. With certification, you can request to receive organized lectures and powerpoints designed for the interactive classroom setting and all other materials needed to teach the course. You will be provided with current field research that you can use to further your studies and help your students grow. Textbooks are also for sale for the classroom if you would like to use the textbook for your students.

Food Scientists

Food Scientists gain insight on research in functional foods with the FFC Certification.  Producing new functional foods is a great way to advance your career, increase business opportunities and sales. You will gain knowledge on how to create new functional food products and you have an opportunity to learn new function/structure claims for your packaging.  You will also learn about the research and results of other studies that you could use for testing new clinical trials and epidemiology studies.

Researchers

Get the latest of research on functional foods with the FFC Certification.  This certification will provide you with evidence on this new research. With this certification, you will have the knowledge to formulate functional food products that could lessen various diseases. You may also use the current research to assist in your future studies.

Physicians and Nurses

The FFC Certification is designed for the medical doctor and nurse to bring functional food research to your practice. Provide your patients with the latest on bioactive compounds in functional foods. Let your practice be part of the newest and latest in functional foods and the medicinal benefits that are provided when specific essential nutrients are consumed.

Course Description

Functional Foods, Bioactive Compounds, and Human Health

~ An introduction to functional foods and bioactive compounds

The course introduces the emerging science of functional foods. In this course FFC discusses the definition of functional foods and their importance. Students will learn how functional foods as part of the everyday diet can be used to reduce the risk of disease. The issues and challenges in the development, testing, marketing, and regulations controlling functional foods and nutraceuticals will be also be covered in addition to the chemistry and physiological effects of functional foods.

Prerequisites:

General Biology and Nutrition/ Food Science courses are recommended

Course objectives for Introduction to Functional Foods:

  • Understand the importance of trans-disciplinary science (food science, nutrigenomics, molecular biology, epidemiology, etc.) for the discovery of bioactive food components and determining its efficacy
  • Understand how functional foods act as potential health benefits and what food sources they come from
  • Understand how to use discoveries in biomedical sciences, USDA databases, and FDA regulations to create new functional food products for general health maintenance, as well as for diet-related chronic diseases
  • Understand the practical steps necessary for discovering and producing new functional foods
  • Make informed choices about functional foods
  • Understand the differences and similarities between medical, functional, and healthy foods
  • Compare differences and similarities for functional foods in different parts of the world
  • Identify relevant  FDA structure, function, and health claims for the new functional food products

Course Objectives for Functional Foods for Chronic Diseases:

  • Understand the epidemiology and biomarkers of cardiovascular disease
  • Functional foods in cancer awareness
  • Be able to define functional foods, functional food components, health benefits, chronic diseases, global markets, and sensory evaluation
  • Understand how chemotherapy has an impact on health and how functional foods can interact
  • Identify the biomarkers and bioactive compounds of functional foods for obesity
  • Understand the epidemiology of diabetes
  • Understand how the mental health of a person can be impacted by functional foods
  • Identify relevant  FDA structure, function, and health claims for new functional food products

What does the course involve?

The course is a self-taught course with an examination and certification of completion. This allows for participants to learn at their own pace and decide for themselves when to take the exam. All resources including syllabus, textbook, powerpoint slides, and PDF files will be provided after purchase as well as a recommended course of action with which to base the studies. The book provides practice quizzes to help you along the way and to provide feedback on your level of comprehension of the material. Once the participant has completed all included chapters, they can take the exam online which, after receiving a passing grade, will provide a printable certification of completion.

Course length: About 1 month

Cost: $400.00

*If an exam retake is required it is $30.00 per attempt

What is included in the price?

  • Syllabus
  • Textbook
  • Powerpoint Slides/ Documents
  • 1 Exam
  • Annual membership for ASFFBC

What if I'm already attending a conference?

Attending one of the conferences will give you insight to the topics discussed in the course. From the course, you will receive power points from presenters at the conference and information on research from around the world. You will also have the chance to study deeper into topics that were discussed at the conference. Attending the San Diego conference will specifically relate to introduction of functional foods and the conference later this year at Harvard will relate to chronic diseases in functional foods.

Register Now


Description of the Course: FFCD

Full title for course:

Functional Foods for Chronic Diseases 

Prerequisites:

General Biology and Nutrition/ Food Science courses are recommended

Name of instructor.

Danik M. Martirosyan, Ph.D.

Functional Food Institute, Dallas, TX ,USA

Phone: 469-441-8272

E-mail: ffc_usa@sbcglobal.net;

Course Length

Approximately 1 month, this is an online course that is self-paced

Course Objectives for Functional Foods for Chronic Diseases:

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to: 

  • Understand the epidemiology and biomarkers of cardiovascular disease
  • Recognize functional foods for cancer awareness
  • Be able to define functional foods, functional food components, health benefits, chronic diseases, global markets, and sensory evaluation
  • Understand how chemotherapy has an impact on health and how functional foods can interact
  • Identify the biomarkers and bioactive compounds of functional foods for obesity
  • Understand the epidemiology of diabetes
  • Understand how the mental health of a person can be impacted by functional foods
  • Identify relevant FDA structure, function, and health claims for new functional food products

Topic Outline of the Course

        Introduction

1.     Epidemiology of Cardiovascular Disease

2.     Biomarkers of Different Cardiovascular Diseases

3.     Functional and Bioactive Lipid Mediators in Modulating CVD Precursors

4.     Effects of Functional Food and Bioactive Compounds on Biomarkers of CVD

5.     Virgin Olive Oil Improves Semen Quality Altered by Hypercholesterolemic Diets in Rabbits

Functional Foods and Cancer

6.     Functional Food and Cancer

7.     Functional Food Components in Cancer Disease

8.     Plants and Plant-based Products Against Cancer

9.     The cytotoxic and anti-proliferative activity of high molecular weight pectin and modified citrus pectin

10.  Functional food in cancer and awareness of chemotherapy and functional food interaction

Functional Foods and Obesity

11.  Functional foods and obesity

12.  Biomarkers and bioactive compounds for obesity

Functional Foods and Diabetes

13.  Epidemiology of Diabetes

14.  Functional Foods for Type 2 diabetes

Functional Foods and Mental Health

15.  Psychology and Dietetics

16.  Active principles in functional foods with antianxiety and antidepressant Effects

Functional Foods and other Chronic Diseases, Policy, and Regulations

17.  Application of enzymes in processing of functional foods

18.  Coffee silverskin extract for aging and chronic diseases

19.  Health claims and functional food

Final Exam

Textbook: Functional Foods for Chronic Diseases: Textbook, Volume Two, First Edition, Edited by Martirosyan DM, Food Science Publisher, Dallas, USA

Teaching Methods:

The course is a self-taught course with an examination and certification of completion. This allows for participants to learn at their own pace and decide for themselves when to take the exam. All resources including syllabus, textbook, powerpoint slides, and PDF files will be provided after purchase as well as a recommended course of action with which to base the studies. The book provides practice quizzes to help you along the way and to provide feedback on your level of comprehension of the material. Once the participant has completed all included chapters, they can take the exam online which, after receiving a passing grade, will provide a printable certification of completion.  

Function of this course in total curriculum

The focus of food science and technology has shifted from previous goals of improving food safety and enhancing food taste, toward providing healthy and functional foods. Today’s consumers desire foods that go beyond basic nutrition - foods capable of promoting better health, or even playing a disease-prevention and management role. To meet this need for innovation, academic research, and the education system at the university, must be combined with the functional food research, development and commercialization strategies. This course is extremely important for food scientists, dietitians, nutritionists, and health care practitioners. It will enable them to discuss food choices for health maintenance and evaluate credible information about food and its role in health promotion, maintenance, and management.


Description of the Course: IFFS

Full title for course:

Functional Foods, Bioactive Compounds, and Human Health

Prerequisites:

General Biology and Nutrition/ Food Science courses are recommended 

Name of instructor.

Danik M. Martirosyan, Ph.D.

Functional Food Institute, Dallas, TX ,USA

Phone: 469-441-8272

E-mail: ffc_usa@sbcglobal.net;   

Course Length

Approximately 1 month, this is an online course that is self-paced

Course Objectives

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Understand the importance of trans-disciplinary science (food science, nutrigenomics, molecular biology, epidemiology, etc.) for the discovery of bioactive food components and determining its efficacy
  • Understand how functional foods act as potential health benefits and what food sources they come from
  • Understand how to use discoveries in biomedical sciences, USDA databases, and FDA regulations to create new functional food products for general health maintenance, as well as for diet-related chronic diseases
  • Understand the practical steps necessary for discovering and producing new functional foods
  • Make informed choices about functional foods
  • Understand the differences and similarities between medical, functional, and healthy foods
    Compare differences and similarities for functional foods in different parts of the world Provide a complete computerized nutritional analysis of new food products with the usage of USDA nutrient databases
    Identify relevant  FDA structural, functional, and health claims for the newly created functional food products

Topic outline of the course

A. Introduction

1. Definition of functional food. Healthy, functional, and medical foods. Similarity and differences between these categories. Bioactive food compounds

2. Functional Foods and its Biomarkers

3. Healthy, functional and medicinal foods: similarities and differences in the categories

4. Scientific standards for evaluating functional food claims (biological mechanism, Intervention trial {randomized controlled clinical trials}, epidemiological evidence)

B. Bioactive Food Compounds: Sources and Potential Health Benefits

5. Efficacy of bioactive compounds and intake levels necessary to achieve desired effect

6. Suitable food vehicle for bioactive ingredients

7. Relationships between bioactive food components and their health benefits

8. Dietary fiber

9. Soluble fiber and prebiotics

10.  Plant sterols

11.  Phytochemicals in disease prevention and intervention

12.  Role of bioactive peptides and its biofunctional attributes

13.  Flavonoids

14.  Fortification of foods with micronutrients

C. Functional Foods and Chronic Diseases

15. Functional Foods and Cardiovascular Disease

16. Functional and healthy foods for the prevention and management of metabolic syndrome and diabetes

17. Management of Metabolic syndrome

18. Spices and functional foods in diabetes

19. Impact of vitamin D on obesity

20. How can omega-3 fatty acids prevent and treat cancer

21. Functional foods in emotional health

22. Functional foods for oral health

23. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and functional foods

C.    Functional Foods: Philosophy, sensory evaluation, interaction and marketing

24.  Philosophy of functional foods in east and west

25.  Sensory evaluation of functional foods

26.  Food and drug interaction

27.  Functional foods ingredients market

Final exam

Textbook:

Introduction to Functional Food Science, Third Edition: Third Edition, Textbook (Volume 1), Edited by Martirosyan DM, Food Science Publisher, Dallas, USA

Teaching Methods:

The course is a self-taught course with an examination and certification of completion. This allows for participants to learn at their own pace and decide for themselves when to take the exam. All resources including syllabus, textbook, power point slides, and PDF files will be provided after purchase as well as a recommended course of action with which to base the studies. The book provides practice quizzes to help you along the way and to provide feedback on your level of comprehension of the material. Once the participant has completed all included chapters, they can take the exam online which, after receiving a passing grade, will provide a printable certification of completion.  

Function of this course in total curriculum

The focus of food science and technology has shifted from previous goals of improving food safety and enhancing food taste, toward providing healthy and functional foods. Today’s consumers desire foods that go beyond basic nutrition - foods capable of promoting better health, or even playing a disease-prevention and management role. To meet this need for innovation, academic research, and the education system at the university, must be combined with the functional food research, development and commercialization strategies. This course is extremely important for food scientists, dietitians, nutritionists, and health care practitioners. It will enable them to discuss food choices for health maintenance and evaluate credible information about food and its role in health promotion, maintenance, and management.


Registration for the FFC’s online Course

This online certification course has been designed to increase awareness and knowledge about functional foods for dietitians, nutritionists, food and nutrition students, professors, food scientists, researchers, nurses, and physicians. The course provides an in-depth look into functional foods and related topics. Courses are self-paced and contain a final examination after completion.

Course 1:

Introduction to Functional Foods

Course 2:

Functional Foods and Chronic Diseases

Course 1: Introduction to Functional Foods

This course is to connect the different fields of science to discover bioactive food components and efficacy. Functional foods will be highlighted for the potential health benefits and food sources and how to make informed decisions on what functional foods to consume. Differences and similarities between medical, functional, and healthy foods will be discussed in detail and current research will be presented.

Course 1 ($600.00 USD): Introduction to Functional Foods

Attendees of an FFC Conference can register for $400.00 USD

Register Here

Course 2: Functional Foods and Chronic Diseases

This course is designed to further understanding on functional foods and how they relate to chronic diseases. Cardiovascular disease, obesity, diabetes, mental health, and cancer and their relation to functional foods will be discussed. With the understanding of functional foods they can be used more in the workplace.

Course 2: ($600.00 USD): Functional Foods and Chronic Diseases

Attendees of an FFC Conference can register for $400.00 USD

Register Here

Course you would like to enroll in:

Introduction to Functional Foods or Functional Foods and Chronic Diseases

Place Order


Registration Form


Below is the list of professionals who have passed the Functional Foods course:

The students enrolled in the course consisted of medical doctors, scientists, traditional Chinese medicine practitioners, pharmacists, dietitians, and students with a food, nutrition and general biology background. The course consisted of using the "Introduction to Functional Food Science" and "Functional Foods for Chronic Disease" textbooks and powerpoint lectures provided by FFC. After completing the course and passing the final exam, students were well trained and aware of how functional foods can help prevent some chronic diseases.

Instructors: Danik M. Martirosyan, Ph.D. and Kamon Chaiyasit, Ph.D., CNW, FACN

Caitlin Feltch, B.S. in Nutrition, Texas Women's University, Denton, TX, USA (IFFS course: 2013 - completed 200 internship hours)

Kathryn Martinez, M.S. in Public Health, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA (IFFS course: 2013 - completed 200 internship hours)

Kyle McGannon, B.S. in Biology, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina, USA (IFFS course: 2013 - completed 200 internship hours)

Rachel Katharine Vaughan, B.S. in Anthropology, Marketing Major, SMU, Dallas TX, USA  (IFFS course: 2013 - completed 200 internship hours)

Reagan Richter, B.S. in Food and Nutrition, Texas Women's University, Denton, TX, USA (IFFS course: 2013 - completed 200 internship hours)

Tracy Johnson, Student, B.S. in Biology, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, USA (IFFS course: 2014 - completed 200 internship hours) 

Gargi Shastri, B.S. in  Physiology and Biophysics, Georgetown University,  Washington, DC, USA (IFFS course: 2014 - completed 200 internship hours)

Cui Fan, Ph.D., Food Technologist, G&A Baking Company, Taylor, MI, USA (IFFS course: 2014 - completed 200 internship hours)

Kristen Williford, B.A. in Biology, Clayton State University, Gergia Atlanta (IFFS course: 2014 - completed 200 internship hours)

Callen Pacier, B.S. in Dietetics, Arizona State University, Phoenix, Arizona, USA (IFFS course: 2015 - completed 200 internship hours)

Pooja Makkar, Ph.D. in Biochemistry, San Diego, CA (IFFS course: 2015 - completed 200 internship hours)

Jaishree Singh,  B.A. in Psychology, The State University of New Jersey, Newark, New York, USA (IFFS course: 2015- completed 200 internship hours)

Keely Hollyfield, B.S. University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland (IFFS course: 2015 - completed 200 internship hours)

Song Qiao, B.S. in Biology, Concordia College, Bronxville, Concordia College, Bronxville, New York
USA, (IFFS course: 2015 - completed 200 internship hours)

Stacie Poulin, B.S. in Food Science, University of Maine, Food Science and Human Nutrition (Major), University of Maine, Orono, ME, USA (IFFS course: 2015 - completed 200 internship hours)

Nicole Ling, B.S. in Nutrition, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst, MA, USA (IFFS course: 2015 - completed 200 internship hours)

Lluvia Castaneda, B.A. in Biological Sciences, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA (IFFS course: 2015 - completed 200 internship hours)

Angela Morales, B.S. in Biology, UC Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA, USA (IFFS course: 2015 - completed 200 internship hours), 

Rebecca Coats, B.S. in Nutrition, Miami University, Oxford, OH, USA (IFFS course: 2015 - completed 200 internship hours)

Seo Ho (Sofia) Moon, B.S. in Nutritional Science-Dietetics, University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA (IFFS course: 2015 - completed 200 internship hours)

Thomas Raynolds, M.S. in Biotechnology, University of San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA (IFFS course: 2015 - completed 200 internship hours)

Jennifer Alway, B.S. in Human Nutrition, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, USA (IFFS course: 2016 - completed 200 internship hours),

Brian McAnany, M.S. in Nutrition and Dietetics, West Chester University, West Chester, PA, USA (IFFS course: 2016 - completed 200 internship hours)

April Mitchell, B.S. in Health Sciences with Pre Medical Emphasis, Ithaca College, Ithaca, New York (IFFS course: 2016 - completed 200 internship hours),

Carissa Penrose, B.S. in Community Health, Utah Valley University, Orem, UT, USA (IFFS course: 2016 - completed 200 internship hours)

Boglarka Jordan, B.S. in Health Sciences, University of Bridgeport, Bridgeport, CT, USA (IFFS course: 2016 - completed 200 internship hours)

Vidhya Udare, MD, MS, University of Bridgeport, Bridgeport, CT, USA (FFCD course: 2016 - completed 200 internship hours)

Banchob Junhasavasdikul, MD, Vitallife Wellness Center, Bumrungrad International Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand (FFCD course: 2016 - completed 80 classroom hours)

Bhurinud Salakij, MD, Vitallife Wellness Center, Bumrungrad International Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand (FFCD course: 2016 - completed 80 classroom hours)

Churailuck Asokanant, Student, Vitallife Wellness Center, Bumrungrad International Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand (FFCD course: 2016 - completed 80 classroom hours)

Danai Dhampibal, MD, Vitallife Wellness Center, Bumrungrad International Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand (FFCD course: 2016 - completed 80 classroom hours)

Eknapa Namsirikul, MD, Vitallife Wellness Center, Bumrungrad International Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand (FFCD course: 2016 - completed 80 classroom hours)

Kazekamon Suwan, MD, Vitallife Wellness Center, Bumrungrad International Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand (FFCD course: 2016 - completed 80 classroom hours)

Natchaya Maitreewech, MD, Vitallife Wellness Center, Bumrungrad International Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand (FFCD course: 2016 - completed 80 classroom hours)

Natnicha Loichuen, MD, Vitallife Wellness Center, Bumrungrad International Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand (FFCD course: 2016 - completed 80 classroom hours)

Nattasak Sribuathong, MD, Vitallife Wellness Center, Bumrungrad International Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand (FFCD course: 2016 - completed 80 classroom hours)

Panisuda Siriwan, Student, Vitallife Wellness Center, Bumrungrad International Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand (FFCD course: 2016 - completed 80 classroom hours)

Pattraprapa Piemyart, Pharm., Vitallife Wellness Center, Bumrungrad International Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand (FFCD course: 2016 - completed 80 classroom hours)

Penkamol Monthiankasem, TCM, Vitallife Wellness Center, Bumrungrad International Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand (FFCD course: 2016 - completed 80 classroom hours)

Pichet Nampulsuksan, MD, Vitallife Wellness Center, Bumrungrad International Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand (FFCD course: 2016 - completed 80 classroom hours)

Pinyapat Chaipurihiran, MD, Vitallife Wellness Center, Bumrungrad International Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand (FFCD course: 2016 - completed 80 classroom hours)

Pornluck Harnphanich, MD, Vitallife Wellness Center, Bumrungrad International Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand (FFCD course: 2016 - completed 80 classroom hours)

Praimast Bintachitt, MD, Vitallife Wellness Center, Bumrungrad International Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand (FFCD course: 2016 - completed 80 classroom hours)

Sarankorn Suchanac, TCM. Vitallife Wellness Center, Bumrungrad International Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand (FFCD course: 2016 - completed 80 classroom hours)

Sopon Iamsirinukool, MD, Vitallife Wellness Center, Bumrungrad International Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand (FFCD course: 2016 - completed 80 classroom hours)

Theerathat Tanamankongprom, TCM. Vitallife Wellness Center, Bumrungrad International Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand (FFCD course: 2016 - completed 80 classroom hours)

Tidarat Boonsriroj, MD, Vitallife Wellness Center, Bumrungrad International Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand (FFCD course: 2016 - completed 80 classroom hours)

Ukrit Jiraputrsunton, MD, Vitallife Wellness Center, Bumrungrad International Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand (FFCD course: 2016 - completed 80 classroom hours)

Wanviput Sanphasitvong, MD, Vitallife Wellness Center, Bumrungrad International Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand (FFCD course: 2016 - completed 80 classroom hours)

Wimonchan Wutthikongsombat, MD, Vitallife Wellness Center, Bumrungrad International Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand (FFCD course: 2016 - completed 80 classroom hours)

Stephanie MacDonald, B.S. in Nutritional Sciences, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA (FFCD course: 2017 - completed 200 internship hours)

Bryan Singharaj, Master Student at California State University, Part-Time Employee at Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA (FFCD course: 2017 - completed 800 internship hours)

Francesco Matrisciano, MD, Ph.D., Loyola University Chicago Department of Molecular Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Loyola University 
Chicago, IL (FFCD course: July 2017 - completed 80 hours course and passed Exam)