Description of the Course: IFFS

Full title for course:

Functional Foods, Bioactive Compounds, and Human Health  

 

Prerequisites:

General Biology and Nutrition/ Food Science courses are recommended

 

Name of instructor.

Danik M. Martirosyan, PhD

Functional Food Institute, Dallas, TX ,USA

Phone: 469-441-8272

E-mail: ffc_usa@sbcglobal.net;   

Course Length

Approximately 1 month, this is an online course that is self-paced

Course Objectives

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Understand the importance of trans-disciplinary science (food science, nutrigenomics, molecular biology, epidemiology, etc.) for the discovery of bioactive food components and determining its efficacy
  • Understand how functional foods act as potential health benefits and what food sources they come from
  • Understand how to use discoveries in biomedical sciences, USDA databases, and FDA regulations to create new functional food products for general health maintenance, as well as for diet-related chronic diseases
  • Understand the practical steps necessary for discovering and producing new functional foods
  • Make informed choices about functional foods
  • Understand the differences and similarities between medical, functional, and healthy foods
    Compare differences and similarities for functional foods in different parts of the world Provide a complete computerized nutritional analysis of new food products with the usage of USDA nutrient databases
    Identify relevant  FDA structureral, functional, and health claims for the newly created functional food products

Topic outline of thr course

A. Introduction

1. Definition of functional food. Healthy, functional, and medical foods. Similarity and differences between these categories. Bioactive food compounds

2. Functional Foods and its Biomarkers

3. Healthy, functional and medicinal foods: similarities and differences in the categories

4. Scientific standards for evaluating functional food claims (biological mechanism, Intervention trial {randomized controlled clinical trials}, epidemiological evidence)

 

B. Bioactive Food Compounds: Sources and Potential Health Benefits

5. Efficacy of bioactive compounds and intake levels necessary to achieve desired effect

6. Suitable food vehicle for bioactive ingredients

7. Relationships between bioactive food components and their health benefits

8. Dietary fiber

9. Soluble fiber and prebiotics

10.  Plant sterols

11.  Phytochemicals in disease prevention and intervention

12.  Role of bioactive peptides and its biofunctional attributes

13.  Flavonoids

14.  Fortification of foods with micronutrients


C. Functional Foods and Chronic Diseases


15. Functional Foods and Cardiovascular Disease

16. Functional and healthy foods for the prevention and management of metabolic syndrome and diabetes

17. Management of Metabolic syndrome

18. Spices and functional foods in diabetes

19. Impact of vitamin D on obesity

20. How can omega-3 fatty acids prevent and treat cancer

21. Functional foods in emotional health

22. Functional foods for oral health

23. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and functional foods
 

C.    Functional Foods: Philosophy, sensory evaluation, interaction and marketing

 

24.  Philosophy of functional foods in east and west

25.  Sensory evaluation of functional foods

26.  Food and drug interaction

27.  Functional foods ingredients marke

 

Final exam

Textbook:
Introduction to Functional Food Science, Third Edition: Third Edition, Textbook (Volume 1), Edited by Martirosyan DM, Food Science Publisher, Dallas, USA
 

Teaching Methods:

The course is a self taught course with an examination and certification of completion. This allows for participants to learn at their own pace and decide for themselves when to take the exam. All resources including syllabus, textbook, power point slides, and PDF files will be provided after purchase as well as a recommended course of action with which to base the studies. The book provides practice quizzes to help you along the way and to provide feedback on your level of comprehension of the material. Once the participant has completed all included chapters, they can take the exam online which, after receiving a passing grade, will provide a printable certification of completion.  

 

Function of this course in total curriculum

The focus of food science and technology has shifted from previous goals of improving food safety and enhancing food taste, toward providing healthy and functional foods. Today’s consumers desire foods that go beyond basic nutrition - foods capable of promoting better health, or even playing a disease-prevention and management role. To meet this need for innovation, academic research, and the education system at the university, must be combined with the functional food research, development and commercialization strategies. This course is extremely important for food scientists, dietitians, nutritionists, and health care practitioners. It will enable them to discuss food choices for health maintenance and evaluate credible information about food and its role in health promotion, maintenance, and management.