Functional Food Center

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FFC's 21st International Conference and Expo on Functional Foods

Functional Foods and Bioactive Compounds in Health and Disease:
Science and Practice
March 25-26, 2017, San Diego Convention Center, San Diego, CA, USA

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Functional Food Center is pleased to announce its 21st International Conference and Expo on Functional Foods "Functional Foods and Bioactive Compounds in Health and Disease: Science and Practice". The conference will be held at San Diego on March 25-26, 2017. The 21st International Conference of Functional Food Center will bring together experts in medicine, biology, and the food industry to discuss the functional foods with bioactive compounds as dietary interventions for chronic diseases, as well as for health promotion.

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Main Conference Topics/Sessions

Session Topics:

  • Functional Food Definition and the Status of Functional Foods in Japan, US and other Countries
  • Functional Foods and Obesity
  • Functional Foods and Diabetes
  • Functional Foods and Neurological Diseases
  • Functional Foods and Cardiovascular Diseases (CVD)
  • Functional Foods and Cancer
  • Functional Foods with Bioactive Compound(s): Prevention and Management of Non-communicable Diseases
  • Safety of the Bioactive Compounds and Functional Foods
  • Biomarkers and Functional Food
  • Special Session: Functional Food, Microbiome and Cancer
  • Special Session: Dietary Exosomes and their Cargos
  • Special session: Engineering bioaccessibility and bioavailability of bioactive compounds
  • Current Research and Development of New Functional Food Products

For more details about the Sessions and main conference topics please visit conference Topics and Sessions page.

Call for Abstracts:

Deadline for abstract submission has been extended until February 10, 2017, 5:pm (PST). The entire abstract should have a maximum of 1,000 words, up to three pages (including references). There is no up-front fee for submitting a conference abstract. Once the abstract is generally accepted for the conference, the corresponding/first author is responsible to pay the abstract publication fee of $49 within 10 days. Failure to pay the abstract publication fee within 10 days after abstract acceptance day will result in a late abstract publication fee of $99. First authors are expected to register, pay the conference and abstract fee, and present the paper (if submission is accepted). In the case of an emergency and the author(s) are unable to attend the conference, they are required to pay an abstract publication fee of $99. Decisions on selection will be promptly communicated to the authors via e-mail. All contributions will be reviewed, and accepted abstracts will be published in the conference proceedings book. Please email your abstract as an attachment to ffc@functionalfoodcenter.com. Please review our sample abstract.

There is no charge for the withdrawal of an abstract before December 30, 2016. In the case that the first author cannot attend the conference and present, he or she must contact the conference organizing committee via e-mail at ffc@functionalfoodcenter.com, to provide notification of withdrawal or to request a substitute presenter. Withdrawals must be received before December 30, 2016.

Please note: Abstracts withdrawn after December 30, 2016, will be published and the first author will be expected to pay the abstract publication fee. The conference does not provide financial support nor registration fee waivers for any presentations.

To avoid the last-minute rush, submit your abstract in advance. Abstracts received by the Conference Organizing Committee after February 10, 2017 at 5 pm will not be accepted). For any information concerning publications please contact us at ffc@functionalfoodcenter.com. For more information about abstract submission, click here.


Instructions for Poster Presenters:

Poster presentations allow the audience to get a clear visual of the presenters' work in a simple format. The reasonable size for posters is 2.5 - 3.0 feet high by 3.5 - 4 feet wide.

Poster Presentation Recommendations:

The poster should clearly present the title, the author(s), affiliation(s), and a description of the research, along with highlighting the abstract's major elements. Remember that pictures, tables, and figures are key to any poster display. At least 50% of the surface area should be used for photos, graphs, or diagrams. Good use of color and the use of black or dark blue for text. Too much color can be hard to read! One or two large high-quality photographs attract attention. Make the title large and clear! Include author(s) name(s) and address(es). Your poster title should be easily readable from 3 - 4 meters away. We recommend the following sections on the poster: Abstract, Introduction, Methods, Tables, Figures, Results, and Conclusions.

For more information about poster sessions, please click here.

Registration Fees:

The registration fee will cover the Conference Proceedings book (Abstract book) and lunches for two days. It will also cover a 12 month membership to the Academic Society for Functional Foods and Bioactive Compounds. Each registration allows the registrant to present up to 3 accepted abstracts maximum.

Cancellation Policy: Before September 30, 2016: 75% refund; before December 30, 2016: 50% refund; after December 30, 2016: No refund. Reimbursements will be sent after the conference. Notice of cancellation of registration must be received in writing to the Conference Secretariat, at: ffc_usa@sbcglobal.net. All refunds will be provided after the conference within 14 days.

You may click here to make a payment for the conference registration fee.

  Standard Rate
Full-Time Students* $325
Dietitians and Retired Professionals* $395
USDA, NIH, FDA $495
Academic (Researchers at Universities) $595
Commercial $695
Exhibitor/Vendor $795
Abstract Publication Fee $49
Late Publication Fee $99
Explore San Diego $50

*Must present ID

Please note: space at this conference is limited and will be allocated on a first come, first served basis.

Students enrolled in an undergraduate program (MS, PhD or MD) are eligible for the Student Discount rate. When you register for the conference, you must enter your mentor's name and Email address during checkout to verify your student status.

Paper Submission:

Deadline for abstract submission has been extended until February 10, 2017, 5:pm (PST). Full-text papers for oral presentations or posters should be submitted before February 28, 2017. Power Points for oral presentations should be submitted before March 10, 2017. Please send all documents to ffc@functionalfoodcenter.com.

Please note that the program and sessions are subject to change.

For more information about the conference, please contact us by e-mail at ffc@functionalfoodcenter.com. For international calls, please use: 469-441-8272, Toll free: 1-866-202-0487


Abstract Submission

Deadline for abstract submission has been extended until February 10, 2017, 5:pm (PST). The entire abstract should have a maximum of 1000 words. Please use Times New Roman Font 12 for the entire abstract.

The first author of the research is considered the primary author and must present. One person may be the primary author for a maximum of 2 abstracts. However, only one abstract may be presented as an oral presentation with the other presented as a poster, or both abstracts may be presented as posters.

1. All abstract submissions must include research-based data to allow for a thorough review.

2. Abstracts must contain the following:

  • Title
  • Author(s) – do not include degree acronyms (i.e., BS, MS, PhD, etc.)
  • Primary Institution/Laboratory Name, City, State, and Country
  • Body of the abstract

3. The body of abstract should contain the following sections:

  • Keywords
  • Background
  • Methods
  • Results
  • Conclusions

4. Abstracts cannot contain the following:

  • Brand names
  • Advertisements. Research abstracts should be free from solicitations and should not contain demonstrations of products for the purpose of sales. Exhibitor’s tables are available for the purpose of advertisement and sales

5. Abstracts can contain either one picture, one graph, or one table (no combinations)

  • A graph or table must be embedded into the abstract and cannot exceed 1/3 of the page
  • Any graph or table must pertain to the abstract for the purpose of visualizing data and must be referred to in the text of the abstract
  • Pictures, tables and graphs should be no bigger than 4 1/2 in. (W) x 4 1/2 in. (L)
  • Keep in mind that all images will be displayed in black and white

6. Please also provide the following information:

  • Corresponding author(s)
  • Primary/Presenting author's name
  • Primary author's professional mailing address, e-mail address, and phone number
  • Desired presentation format (oral, poster, etc.)
  • Session name
  • Co-authors' e-mail addresses

Please note: the portion of abstract is required for our records, but will not appear in the published abstract and accordingly will not included in worrd count.

Also note: article submission to the Journal of Functional Foods in Health and Disease is mandatory for the oral presenters.

Click here for the sample abstract.


Sample Abstract 1 (Research)

Diacylglycerol for obesity: serotonin hypothesis

Hidekatsu Yanai1, Hiroshi Yoshida2, 3, Yuji Hirowatari4, and Norio Tada3

1Department of Internal Medicine, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Kohnodai Hospital, Chiba, 21567-0345, Japan; 2Department of Laboratory Medicine, Jikei University School of Medicine, Chiba, 31567-0345, Japan; 3Internal Medicine of Metabolism and Nutrition, Jikei University Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba, 41567-0345, Japan; 4Bioscience Division, TOSOH Corp, Kanagawa, 51567-0345, Japan

Corresponding Author: Hidekatsu Yanai, PhD, Department of Internal Medicine, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Kohnodai Hospital, Chiba, 21567-0345, Japan

Keywords: diacylglycerol, intestine, obesity, serotonin, thermogenesis

Background: Diacylglycerol (DAG) oil is a natural component of various edible oils. DAG has been reported to prevent obesity through a variety of potential mechanisms in comparison with triacylglycerol (TAG) in humans. An increase in postprandial energy expenditure (EE) is proposed to be one of the mechanisms underlying this effect of DAG. Up-regulated mRNA expressions associated with EE by DAG in the small intestine may explain increased postprandial EE. The small intestine seems to contribute to changes in EE by DAG. We previously studied plasma serotonin, which is mostly present in the small intestine and mediates sympathetic thermogenesis. We found that DAG ingestion increases plasma serotonin levels by approximately 50% compared to TAG ingestion.

Objective: To understand the molecular mechanisms for DAG-induced increase in serotonin and EE, we investigated effects of DAG on serotonin release and expressions of genes associated with EE, using the human intestinal cell line.

Methods: The intestinal cell line, the Caco-2 cells, was incubated with medium containing 1-monoacylglycerol (1-monooleyglycerol [1-MOG]) and 2-monoacylglycerol (2-monooleylglycerol [2-MOG]), distinctive digestive products of DAG and TAG, respectively. We measured serotonin release from the Caco-2 cells using a newly developed high-performance liquid chromatography. Further, we studied effects of 1-MOG, 2-MOG, and serotonin on expressions of mRNA associated with EE (acyl-CoA oxidase [ACO], medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase [MCAD], fatty acid translocase [FAT], and uncoupling protein-2 [UCP-2]), by the Real-Time quantitative RT-PCR system.

Results: 100 mM 1-MOG significantly increased serotonin release from the Caco-2 cells compared with the same concentration of 2-MOG by approximately 37% (P<0.001). Expressions of mRNA of ACO, FAT, and UCP-2 were significantly higher in 100 mM 1-MOG-treated Caco-2 cells than 100 mM 2-MOG-treaed cells by approximately 13%, 24%, and 35%, respectively. Expressions of mRNA of ACO, MCAD, FAT, and UCP-2 were significantly increased in 400 nM serotonin-treated Caco-2 cells as compared with the Caco-2 cells incubated without serotonin by approximately 29%, 30%, and 39%, respectively.

Conclusion: Our study demonstrated that a hydrolytic product of DAG increases serotonin release from the intestinal cells and enhances expressions of genes associated with b-oxidation (ACO, MCAD), thermogenesis (UCP-2) and fatty acids metabolism (FAT). Furthermore, this study revealed that serotonin also enhances expression of these genes, proposing a new molecular biological mechanism for DAG-mediated anti-obesity effect. Serotonin may play an important role in DAG-mediated prevention of obesity.

(Please note: the portion below is required for our records, but will not appear in the published abstract)

FFC's 21st International Conference

Corresponding Author: Hidekatsu Yanai, PhD, Professor, Department of Internal Medicine, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Kohnodai Hospital, Chiba, 01567-0345, Japan, e-mail: hy@gmal.com, phone number: (001) 469-441-8272, secondary phone: (866) 464-6955

Main Presenting Author: Hidekatsu Yanai, PhD, Professor, Department of Internal Medicine, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Kohnodai Hospital, Chiba, 01567-0345, Japan, e-mail: hy@gmal.com, phone number: (001) 469-441-8272, secondary phone: (866) 464-6955

Co-authors:

Hiroshi Yoshida, MD, PhD, e-mail: hyoshida@gmal.com

Yuji Hirowatari, PhD, e-mail: yhir@gmal.com

Norio Tada, MS, e-mail: mtada@gmal.com

Presentation Type (please choose one): Oral or poster

Session (please choose one): Choose one from the conference website


Sample Abstract 2 (Review)

Definition for functional food by FFC: Creating functional food products using new definition

April Mitchell and Danik Martirosyan

Functional Food Center/Functional Food Institute, Dallas, TX, 75252, USA

Corresponding Author: Danik M. Martirosyan, Functional Food Center/Functional Food Institute, Dallas, TX, 75252, USA

Keywords: Functional food definitions, bioactive compounds, biomarkers

ABSTRACT

Healthcare costs in industrialized countries are soaring as a result of rising average life expectancies and epidemics of specific chronic diseases. As the public pursues ways to become healthier and improve quality of life, functional food science has become an intriguing field of research and topic of debate to combat certain chronic diseases cost-effectively. While steps are being taken to develop and research functional food consistently across the globe, there is still not a shared international or conclusive definition of functional food. The term “functional food” was first coined in Japan in the 1980’s and the science expanded to EU and the United States quickly. However, the term “functional food” has since been the center of confusion in scientific and consumer discussions due to shifting definitions. Inconsistent definitions in the literature and government legislation have posed challenges for the development of functional food science and have caused public doubt in the effectiveness of functional food as a potential strategy for chronic diseases.

Here, the Functional Food Center’s new definition for “functional foods” was revised to: “Natural or processed foods that contains known or unknown biologically- active compounds; which, in defined, effective non-toxic amounts, provide a clinically proven and documented health benefit for the prevention, management, or treatment of chronic disease” [1,2]. In this latest version of our definition, we added the phrase “in effective non-toxic amounts” to highlight the significance of bioactive compound dosage in the consumption of functional food. This new definition of functional food by the Functional Food Center can improve communication and collaboration between the scientific, medical communities, food industry, and the public to legitimize functional food science globally.

References:

Danik M. Martirosyan and Jaishree Singh, A new definition of functional food by FFC: what makes a new definition unique? Functional Foods in Health and Disease 2015; 5(6):209-223

Danik M. Martirosyan and Jaishree Singh, Introduction to Functional Food Science, Third Edition, Editied by Martirosyan DM, Dallas: Food Science Publisher; 2015:10-24

(Please note: the portion below is required for our records, but will not appear in the published abstract)

FFC's 21st International Conference

Corresponding Author: Danik Martirosyan, PhD, Research and Development Department, Functional Food Institute, Dallas, TX, 75024, Plano (Dallas), USA, e-mail: ffc_usa@sbcglobal.net, phone number: (001) 469-441-8272, secondary phone: (866) 202-0487

Main Presenting Author: Danik Martirosyan, PhD, Research and Development Department, Functional Food Institute, Dallas, TX, 75024, Plano (Dallas), USA, e-mail: ffc_usa@sbcglobal.net, phone number: (001) 469-441-8272, secondary phone: (866) 202-0487

Co-authors:

April Mitchell, BSc, e-mail: ffc@functionalfoodcenter.com

Presentation Type (please choose one): Oral or poster: oral

Session (please choose one): Choose one from the conference website: Session: Functional Food Definition and the Status of Functional Foods in Japan, USA and other Countries


Guidelines for Full Paper Submission:

Participants with accepted abstracts may write full articles:

  1. The entire text of the full papers must be in Times New Roman, 12 point size font.
  2. Full paper margins should be 0.75 inches from the top and bottom, and 1.0 inch from the left and right for A4 format paper.
  3. Line spacing should be 1.15 and alignment justified.
  4. The submitted full papers should contain 6-16 pages. A shorter or longer manuscript must be discussed with the organizing committee.
  5. When submitting a full paper, the corresponding author should send a cover letter indicating that the authors have not submitted a similar manuscript for publication elsewhere. Full papers submitted without cover letters will not be published.
  6. The full papers and cover letter should be submitted as separate attachments to the following email address: ffc_usa@sbcglobal.net.
  7. Submit the full paper within 2 months following the date in the abstract acceptance letter, but no later than the date mentioned on the conference website.
  8. Full papers will be published in FFC’s Journal of Functional Foods in Health and Disease. Please download and use the suggested samples for an original scientific paper, review paper, and cover letter.
  9. As a token of our appreciation for article submissions in the Special Issue, we are offering 50% discount of our standard publication fee. The final cost will be $348.00. If sufficient scientific funds are unavailable for coverage of the discounted publication fee, ASFFBC is willing to accommodate as needed. Please contact us (in advance) for more details, if necessary. Don't miss your chance to be a part of this!
  10. Full-text papers should be submitted before July 30, 2017 and it is mandatory for oral presenters.

Accepted Abstracts

  1. High prevalence of asthma and its determinants among children enrolled in Michigan migrant and seasonal head start programs. Farabi N, Song SJ, Crockett ET, Song WO
  2. Evaluation of the anti-inflammatory activities of Quillaja saponaria Mol. Saponin extract in mice. Sarkhel S
  3. Analysis of sugarcane as a potential functional food. Raymond W, W. Chong, Christopher McRae, Nicolle H. Packer
  4. Recovery of high added-value food ingredients from Tunisian citrus limon by-product: Identification and creation of functional food products. Gargouri B. Sonda Ammar S, Verardo V, Carretero AS, Bouaziz M
  5. In vitro bio-accessibility and antioxidant activity of four edible green leaves. K. D. P. P. Gunathilake, K. K. D. S Ranaweera, H. P. Vasantha Rupasinghe
  6. Thermal protection of vitamins B1, B2, B3 and B12 by using bacterial nanocellulose to further uses in processed food. Sánchez D, Canas A, Osorio M, Castro C
  7. Quality characteristics of functional bread fortified with date palm fruit residue. Hashim IB, Ragaee S and Khalil AH
  8. Allometric scaling: Theory and applications. Rucker RB
  9. Lost in Translation: Allometric scaling of bioactive dietary n-3 and n-6 fatty acids. Whelan J
  10. Modifying animal diets to increase relevance to human populations. Hintze K.J., Ward, R..E., Benninghoff A.D., and Lefevre M.
  11. Effect of a probiotic Lactobacillus strains on vaginal microbiota and bacterial vaginosis. Schrezenmeir J., Laue C., Papazova E., Liesegang A., Pannenbeckers A., Arendarski P., Linnerth B., Domig K., Kneifel W., Petricevic L.
  12. Potentiation of anti-inflammatory activities of indomethacin by grape fruit juice in carrageenan –induced mice paw edema. Sarkhel S.
  13. Phenolic extract from Ficus capensis leaves inhibits key enzymes linked to erectile dysfunction and prevent oxidative stress in rats' penile tissue. Akomolafe SF., Oboh G., Oyeleye S.I., Aline A. and Boligon AA.
  14. Reduction of iron in the serum and liver of iron-overloaded mice using magnetotactic bacterium Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense MSR-1. Leila H.G.J., Masoud G., Nezamedine H.S.
  15. Intestinal infection in malnourished children. Daneshvar H.K., and Rahimkhani M.
  16. Morinda citrifolia (Noni), a tropical adaptogenic food and medicinal plant with multiple uses in health and disease. Westendorf J., Mettlich C., and Algenstaedt P.
  17. Allometric scaling models: history, use, and misuse in translating resveratrol from basic science to human clinical applications. Smoliga J.M.
  18. Chenopodium album a locally used vegetable in Kashmir valley and its medicinal properties. Lone B.A., Chishti M.Z., Bhat F.A., Bandh S.A., and Khan A.
  19. Bovine milk exosomes and their cargos may regulate metabolism through non-canonical pathways in non-bovine species. Zempleni J., Zhou F., Wu Di, Manca S., Sadri M., Fernando S., Pas H., Shu J., and Cui J.
  20. Low molecular pectin protects against heavy metal exposure. Khotimchenko M., Khozhaenko E., Kovalev V.
  21. Comparative phytochemical composition of the seed and pulp of velvet tamarid (Dialium guineense) plant. Oyetayo F.L. and Bolorunduro B.C.
  22. Horizontal delivery of microRNAs via food-mother-pup axis. Le Provost, Laubier J., Marthey S., Castille J., Le Guillou S.
  23. Use of probiotics and oat β-glucan as prebiotics to control obesity: A synbiotic approach. Ke X. and Cheung PCK
  24. Novel product development, organoleptic analysis and haccp projection of a dessert made from lotus stem (Nelumbo nucifera). Vora J.D., Srinivasan P.
  25. Obesity, soy protein diet and liver steatosis. Hakkak R. and Korourian S.
  26. Safety and free testosterone boosting effficacy of a novel Curculigo orchioides extract in male rats. Bachi D., Swaroop A., Bagchi M., Preuss H.G.
  27. Glucuronidation and molecular docking of steviol with UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 2B7. Xia Y., Chen J., Fang Y., Zhang Y., Wang H., Liu X.
  28. Studies on the highly efficient biosynthesis of functional oligosaccharides. Cheng H., Wang H., Li L., Deng Z.
  29. Anti-adipogenic activities of (–)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate through modulation of the AMPK pathway in 3T3-L1 cells. Cheon W., Kim Y.
  30. Anti-adipogenic activity of Ligularia stenocephalain extract in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Seo D., Kim Y.
  31. Curcumin can improve hypertension in aged type 2 diabetic patients by modulating oxidative stress. Mirmiranpour H., Nakhjavani M., Esteghamati A., Salehi S.S., Lari M., Hashemi P., and Firouzabadi F.D.
  32. Conjugated linoleic acid vesicles worked in physiological pH environment. Fang Y., Fan Y., Ma J., Li Y., Xia Y.
  33. Beneficial effects on fasting insulin and OGTT responses with intake of New Zealand blackcurrant powder. Willems M., Silva J.D.S., Cook M., and Blacker S.
  34. Folic acid transfer from feed to egg yolk layers. Saki A.A., Abdolmaleki M., Mirzaie S., Zamni P., Ashoori A.
  35. Tarin, the lectin from Colocasia esculenta, reduces cyto and genotoxic effects of cyclophosphamide in mice. Corrêa A.C., Mérida L.A.D., Mattos E.B.A., Pereira P.R., Paschoalin VMF, Pinho MFB, Vericimo MA
  36. Functional quality, sensorial and shelf life characteristics of agathi (Sesbania grandiflora (L).Poir leaves enriched breads. Aruna M, Sumana A
  37. Bacteriome and mycobiome interactions underscore microbial dysbiosis in familial Crohn’s Disease: Role of probiotics and other therapeutic options. Ghannoum M
  38. Development of Halomonas Levan based functional food ingredients. Hasköylü ME, Özer Ç, Öner ET
  39. Effects of fermentation on the nutritional and anti-nutritional components of cooked/boiled water melon (Citrullus Lanatus) seed. Makinde OA, Adejoro DO, Odubanjo VO and Ajayi AS
  40. The determination of probiotic consumptions of university students by assessing their perceptions through these products. Hasköylü A, Biçer AH, Aktac S, Günes FE
  41. Induce increase lipidic compounds as food ingredient in microalgae and its anticancer and antioxidant properties. El-Baroty GS, Abd El Baky HH
  42. Phytochemical profile and bioactivities of coffee leaf: the impacts of processing methods and the age of leaf. Chen X, Ma Z, Petitvallet A, Rivest M, Kitts DD
  43. Comparison of the biological activities between carnosic acid and piciferic acid. Shibata S, Kayashima T, Ishitobi H, Miyaki S, Kawaoka T, Matsubara K
  44. Diet and functional impairments among elderly Chinese living in urban Shanghai. Zhu J, Cai H, Xiang YB, Li H, Gao YT, Zheng W, Shu XO
  45. Bacteroides xylanisolvens DSM 23964 consumption promotes anti-TFα antibody generation. Hart F, Schmidt J, Ulsemer P, Toutounian K, Hahn A, Goletz A
  46. Effects of α-galactooligosaccharides on high fat diet induced metabolic syndrome in mice. Dai Z, Lyu W, Xie M, Chen G, Zeng X
  47. Time effect on the antioxidant activity of commercial green juice and its manufactured equivalent. Kouprianoff J, Bernardo MA, Moncada M, Silva ML, Brito J, Mesquita F
  48. In-vitro probiotic and functional properties of Lactic acid bacteria recovered from date syrup. Arasu MV, Al-Dhabi NA
  49. In vitro physiological genistein concentrations do not inhibit proliferation in prostate cancer cells. Usak ST and Kandas NO
  50. Theobromine crosses the blood brain barrier resulting in increased phosphorylation of vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein and cAMP-response element-binding protein in the mouse brain. Sugimoto N, Katakura M, Matsuzaki K, Yoneda M, Sumiyoshi E, Ohno-Shosaku T, Yachie A, Shido O.
  51. Unraveling the intricate relationship between food, nutrition, and health. Slupsky C.
  52. Gut microbiota dictate metabolic fate of Curcumin in the colon. Li Z, Sun Y, Song M, Li F, Gu M, Xiao H.
  53. Evaluating the efficacy of probiotic bacterial isolates in reducing the human food borne pathogen Campylobacter in chickens. Donoghue AM, Arsi K, Shreshta S, Wagle BR and Donoghue DJ
  54. Furan and its derivatives in foods: characterising the hazard. Gill S, Kavanagh M, Cherry W, Barker M, Weld M, and Cooke GM
  55. RP-UHPLC- DAD-QTOF- MS screening of bioactive components involved in anti-hyperglycemic and antioxidant activities of Tunisian Ficus carica L. leaves extracts. Ammar S, Belguith-Hadriche O, Segura-Carretero A, Bouaziz M
  56. Health benefits of the low molecular alginates from marina brown algae. Khotimchenko Y, Khozhaenko E, Kovalev V, Khootimchenko R, and Fil M
  57. The microbiome influences homeostatic control of eukaryotic ABC transporters at the intestinal mucosal surface during health and disease. Szabady RL, Tuohy C, Mrsny RJ, McCormick BA
  58. Milk composition of ewe fed soybean grain and cottonseed. Carolina Rodriguez Jimenez, Helder Louvandini, Tairon Panunzio da Silva, Egon Hion Ieda, Natasha Mantuam, Debora Botequio, Raul Machado Neto, Adibe Luiz Abdalla
  59. Effect of Fagopyrum esculentum (Common Buckwheat) Flour on Anti-oxidant Defence and Lipid Profile in High Cholesterol Fed Rats. Vanadhna Gandhi, Sunil Kumar Sharma, and Sudarshan Ojha
  60. Astaxanthin attenuates neurotoxicity in a mouse model of Parkinson's Disease. Grimmig B, Daly L, Hudson C, Bickford PC
  61. New extracellular vesicles carry most dairy cow milk microRNAs and likely protect them from degredation during digestion. Provost P, Benmoussa A, Boilard E, Gilbert C, Fliss I
  62. Biological potential evaluation of Litsea glaucescens Kunth extracts. Lopez-Romero JC, Gonzalez-Rios H, Hernandez-Martinez J, Dominguez-Esquivel Z, Pena-Ramos A, Ayala Zavala F, Martinez-Benevidez E, Higuera-Ciapara I, Navarro-Navarro M, Valazquez-Contreras C
  63. Maternal-filial effect on the performance and testicular morphology of lambs from ewes fed cottonseed (gossypol). Louvandini H, Ieda EH , Jimenez RJ, Dias e Silva TP, Tavares Lima PM, Abdalla AL, McManus CM
  64. Oil palm phenolics significantly reduced neurotoxic metabolites associated with neurodegeneration in a diet induced aged rat model of Alzheimer's disease. Gupta SV, Wu Y, Sambanthamurthi R
  65. Comparison of the effect of antibiotic, probiotic, prebiotic, phytobiotic and Bacillus subtilis on broiler performance. Monese Hamidi, Shaban Rahimi, Nahid Mojgani
  66. Effect of antibiotics, prebiotics and Lactobacillus plantarum on broiler performance. Samane Rasulzade, Shaban Rahimi and Kambiz Akbari
  67. Effect of poison oak and pasteurization on miRNA of milk exosomes of goats. Emily Sahagun, Jimmy Bell, Jennifer Belveal1, Sarah Akers, Randi Wilson, Chelsey Naito, Claudia Ingham, Lisbeth Goddik, David Hendrix, Duo Jiang, and Massimo Bionaz
  68. Extraction of bioactives from sugar kelp (Saccharina latissima), winged kelp (Alaria eculenta) and sea lettuce (Ulva lactuca) from the north atlantic with “green” extraction methods: hot water and electroporation. Guðrún Marteinsdóttir, Magdalena M. Stefaniak, Ragnhildur Einarsdóttir, Ólafur Eysteinn Sigurjónsson, Magnus Gudmundsson, Kristberg Kristbergsson
  69. Recent developments in food vehicles for delivery of bioactive compounds in functional foods. Kristberg Kristbergsson, Jochen Weiss and Julian McClements
  70. Validation of micronutrients against food frequency questionnaire intakes using simulated diets. Amanda Chapman Howard, S. Pamela K. Shiao
  71. Membrane lipid replacement with glycerolphospholipids protected with fructooligosaccharides to restore mitochondrial function and reduce fatigue, pain, gastrointestinal and other symptoms in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Fibromyalgia. Garth L. Nicolson, Paul C. Breeding, Bob Settineri and Rita R. Ellithorpe
  72. The effects of bioactive compounds derived from sake cake “Sakekasu,” a byproduct of Japanese sake (alcohol) fermentation, on senescence-accelerated mouse and diabetes model mouse. Mayumi Okuda, Sachi Shibata, Ryouhei Iijima, Hanae Izu, Tsutomu Fujii, Kiminori Matsubara
  73. Optimization of encapsulation conditions of vitamin C within yeast cell Saccharomyces cervisiea as biocapsule. Zohreh Hamidi-Esfahani, Samira Malekzadeh-Sariyarghan, and Soleiman Abbasi
  74. Arachidonic acid production using Mortierella alpinain batch and fed-batch fermentation. Zohreh Hamidi-Esfahani, Shadi Motahari, and Soleiman Abbasi
  75. A novel promising herb formula in sexual health. Geng-Long Hsu, Cheng-Hsing Hsieh
  76. The determination of some physical, chemical and antiocidant properties of gemlik olives and oils grown at the southeastern anatolia. Ebru Sakar, Hulya Unver, Zeynep Mujde Sakar, Bekir Erol AK, Can Yesirgil
  77. Astragalus Extract Mixture for Height Growth in Children with Mild Short Stature: A Multicenter, Double-Blind, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial. Donghun Lee, Sun Haeng Lee, Hee-jung Jee, Sung Ho Cha, Gyu Tae Chang

Conference Program

-Explore San Diego-

March 25th, 18:00-20:30 We will leave for a networking dinner on the beautiful Coronado Island. We will take a 15 minute ferry ride from the Convention Center to Coronado Island. You will be able to walk around many shops and restaurants, sightsee, and view the San Diego skyline across the bay. We will then come together for dinner near the harbor. Finally, we will ferry back to the Convention Center, and stroll around Seaport Village. Both of the ferries and your dinner will be included in your $50 payment. To submit your payment, please click here.

Scientific Program

March 25, 2017

8:15-8:45 Registrations

8:45-9:05 Welcome and Opening Remarks: Definition and Current Status of Functional Foods. Danik Martirosyan, Co-chairman: President, Functional Food Center; Dallas, TX, USA.

Session 1: Allometric Scaling from Rodents to Humans

Session Chair: Jay Whelan, PhD, Professor and Head, Department of Nutrition, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, USA, and Robert Ward, PhD, (Session co-chair) Associate Professor. Department of Food Sciences, Utah State University, Logan, UT, USA

9:05-9:35 Robert Rucker, PhD, Professor (Keynote Speaker), University of California, Davis, Davis, CA, USA. Allometric scaling, metabolic body size and interspecies comparisons of basal nutritional requirements

9:35-10:00 James Smoliga, PhD, High Point University, High Point, NC, USA. What are the existing allometric scaling (mathematical) models: advantages and disadvantages?

10:00-10:25 Korry Hintze, PhD, Utah State University, Nutrition, Dietetics and Food Sciences, Logan, UT, USA. Formulation of the Western diet

10:25-10:50 Jay Whelan, PhD, Professor and Head, Department of Nutrition, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, USA. Allometric scaling of dietary n-3 and n-6 fatty acids

10:50-11:05 Coffee and Exhibitor break

Session 2: Functional Foods, Bioactive Compounds and Microbiome

Session Chair: David Sela, PhD, Assistant Professor, Department of Food Science, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA, USA

11:05-11:30 Carolyn Slupsky, PhD, Professor, Chair of the Graduate Group in Nutrition, Department of Nutrition, University of California, Davis. Unraveling the intricate relationship between food, nutrition, and health

11:30-11:55 Beth A. McCormick, PhD, Professor and Vice Chair, Founder, Center for Microbiome Research, Department of Microbiology and Physiological Systems, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, USA. The microbiome influences homeostatic control of eukaryotic ABC transporters at the intestinal mucosal surface during health and disease

11:55-12:20 Hang Xiao, PhD, Associate Professor, University of Massachusetts Amherst, MA, USA. Gut microbiota dictate metabolic Fate of Curcumin in the colon

12:20-12:45 Kristen L. Beck, PhD, Researcher, Sequencing the Food Supply Chain Almaden Research Center, San Jose, CA, USA. A big tech approach to a "small" problem: microbiome characterization of raw food ingredients to improve food safety

12:45-13:10 David Sela, PhD, Assistant Professor, Department of Food Science, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA, USA. Bifidobacteria metabolize milk oligosaccharides within the infant microbiome via the fructose-6-phosphate phosphoketolase pathway

13:10-14:10 Lunch

Session 3: Immunomodulation by Functional Foods: Promising Concept for Chronic Disease and Healthy Aging

Session Chair: Gabriela Riscuta MD, CNS, Program Director, Nutritional Science Research Group, Division of Cancer Prevention, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD and Jürgen Schrezenmeir (Session co-chair) PhD, Clinical Research Center, KITZ, Kiel, Germany

14:10-14:35 Jürgen Schrezenmeir, MD, Professor, Clinical Research Center, KITZ, Kiel, Germany. Effect of a probiotic Lactobacillus strains on vaginal microbiota and bacterial vaginosis

14:50-15:10 Smiti V. Gupta, PhD, Associate Professor, Department of Nutrition and Food Science, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI, USA. Oil Palm Phenolics significantly reduced neurotoxic metabolites associated with neurodegeneration in a diet induced aged rat model of Alzheimer’s disease

14:35-14:50 Jingjing Zhu, PhD Student, Division of Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, USA. Diet and functional impairments among elderly Chinese living in urban Shanghai

15:10-15:25 Bethany Grimmig, Graduate Student, Department of Molecular Pharmacology and Physiology, USF Morsani College of Medicine, Tampa FL, USA. Astaxanthin Attenuates Neurotoxicity in a Mouse Model of Parkinson’s disease

15:25-15:45 Jyoti D. Vora, PhD, Head, Department of Biochemistry and Food Science and Quality Control, Ramnarain Ruia College, Matunga, Mumbai. India. Novel product development, organoleptic analysis and haccp projection of a dessert made from lotus stem (Nelumbo nucifera)

15:45-15:55 Coffee and Exhibitor break

Session 4: Functional Food Ingredients: Sources and Potential Benefits in Public Health

Session Chair: Johannes Westendorf, PhD, Professoer Emeritus, Institute of Experimental Pharmacology and Toxicology University Medical School, Germany

15:55-16:20 Johannes Westendorf, PhD, Professoer Emeritus, Institute of Experimental Pharmacology and Toxicology University Medical School, Germany. Morinda citrifolia (Noni), a tropical adaptogenic food and medicinal plant with multiple uses in health and disease

16:20-16:40 Felix Hart, PhD, Avitop GmbH, Berlin, Germany. Bacteroides xylanisolvens DSM 23964 consumption promotes anti-TFα antibody generation

16:40-16:55 Sumana Sarkhel, PhD, Assistant Professor,Department of Human Physiology with Community Health, Vidyasagar University, Paschim Medinipur, West Bengal, India. Evaluation of the anti-inflammatory activities of Quillaja saponaria Mol. Saponin extract in mice

16:55-17:15 Xiu-Min Chen, PhD, Research Associate, Food, Nutrition, and Health, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. Phytochemical profile and bioactivities of coffee leaf: the impacts of processing methods and the age of leaf

17:15-17:35 Debasis Bagchi, PhD, Professor, Departments of Pharmacological and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Houston College of Pharmacy, Houston, TX, USA, and Cepham Research Center, Piscataway, NJ, USA. Safety and free testosterone boosting efficacy of a novel Curculigo orchioides extract in male rats

17:35-17:40 Conference closing

18:00-20:30 -Explore San Diego-Networking Dinner on the beautiful Coronado Island

March 26, 2017

Session 5: Dietary Exosomes and their Cargos

Session Chair: Janos Zempleni, PhD, Professor, Director of the Nebraska Gateway to Nutrigenomics, Department of Nutrition and Health Sciences, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE, USA

8:15-8:40 Fabienne Le Provost, PhD, “Functional genomics and Physiology of mammary gland” Team Leader, GABI, INRA, AgroParisTech, Université Paris-Saclay, Jouy-en-Josas, France. Horizontal delivery of microRNAs via food-mother-pup axis

8:40-9:05 Patrick Provost, PhD. Professor, Faculty of Medicine, Université Laval. CHUQ Research Center / CHUL Axe des maladies infectieuses et immunitaires, Quebec, Canada. New extracellular vesicles carry most dairy cow milk microRNAs and likely protect them from degradation during digestion

9:05-9:30 Massimo Bionaz, PhD, Assistant Professor, Animal and Rangeland Sciences, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR. USA. Effect of poison oak and pasteurization on miRNA of milk exosomes of goats

9:30-9:55 Janos Zempleni, PhD, Professor, Director of the Nebraska Gateway to Nutrigenomics, Department of Nutrition and Health Sciences, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE, USA. Bovine milk exosomes and their cargos may regulate metabolism through non-canonical pathways in non-bovine species

9:55-10:15 Coffee and Exhibitor break

Session 6: Functional Foods and Chronic Diseases

Session Chair: Garth L. Nicolson, PhD, MD (H), Professor Emeritus, Department of Molecular Pathology, The Institute for Molecular Medicine, Huntington Beach, CA USA

10:15-10:35 Bharat B. Aggarwal, PhD, Founding Director, Inflammation Research Center, San Diego, California; USA; Former Professor of Experimental Therapeutics, Cancer Medicine and Immunology, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA. Targeting inflammatory pathways by dietary agents for prevention and treatment of cancer

10:35-10:55 Mark Willems, PhD, Professor, Department of Sport and Exercise Sciences, University of Chichester, Chichester, United Kingdom. Beneficial effects on fasting insulin and OGTT responses with intake of New Zealand blackcurrant powder

10:55-11:15 Hairong Cheng, PhD, associate Professor, School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China. Studies on the highly efficient biosynthesis of functional oligosaccharides

11:15-11:35 Kiminori Matsubara, PhD, Associate Professor, Department of Human Life Science Education, Graduate School of Education, Hiroshima University, Higashihiroshima, Hiroshima, Japan. The effects of bioactive compounds derived from sake cake “Sakekasu,” a byproduct of Japanese sake (alcohol) fermentation, on senescence-accelerated mouse and diabetes model mouse

11:35-11:55 Geng-Long Hsu, MD, Microsurgical Potency Reconstruction and Research Center, Hsu’s Andrology and National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan. A novel promising herb formula in sexual health

11:55-12:20 Garth L. Nicolson, PhD, MD (H), Professor Emeritus, Department of Molecular Pathology, The Institute for Molecular Medicine, Huntington Beach, CA USA. Membrane Lipid Replacement with glycerolphospholipids protected with fructooligosaccharides to restore mitochondrial function and reduce fatigue, pain, gastrointestinal and other symptoms in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Fibromyalgia

12:20-13:20 Lunch

Session 7: Current Research and Development of New Functional Food Products

Session Co-chairs: Reza Hakkak, PhD, Professor and Danik Martirosyan, PhD

13:20-13:45 Isameldin B. Hashim, PhD, Professor, Chair of Food Science Department, College of Food & Agriculture, UAEU, Al-Ain, UAE. Quality characteristics of functional bread fortified with date palm fruit residue

13:45-14:10 Mesa Aruna, PhD, Professor, Department of Home Science (Food Science & Nutrition), Sri Padmavati Mahila Visvavidyalayam, Andhra Pradesh, India. Functional quality, sensorial and shelf life characteristics of agathi (Sesbania grandiflora (L).Poir leaves enriched breads

14:10-14:35 Reza Hakkak, Ph.D, Professor and Chair, Department of Dietetics and Nutrition, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR, USA. Soy Diet and Liver Steatosis Protection

14:35-15:00 Kristberg Kristbergsson, PhD, Professor, Faculty of Food Science and Nutrition, School of Health Sciences, University of Iceland. Office at Innovation Center Iceland, Reykjavík, Iceland. Recent Developments in Food Vehicles for Delivery of Bioactive Compounds in Functional Foods

15:00-16:00 Session 8: Poster and Networking Session

16:00-16:15 Awards and Membership Certificates (Membership for Academic Society of Functional Foods and Bioactive Compounds).

16:15-16:30 Conference Closing


Speakers

Janos Zempleni, Ph.D, Willa Cather Professor of Molecular Nutrition, Director of the Nebraska Center for the Prevention of Obesity Diseases through Dietary Molecules, Director of the Nebraska Gateway to Nutrigenomics, Department of Nutrition and Health Sciences, University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Lincoln, NE, USA. The communication of animal and bacterial kingdoms through exosomes and their RNA cargos in bovine milk

Jay Whelan, PhD, (Session chair), Professor and Head, Department of Nutrition, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, USA. Presentation topic: Allometric scaling of dietary n-3 and n-6 fatty acids

James Smoliga, PhD, High Point University, High Point, NC, USA. Presentation topic: What are the existing allometric scaling (mathematical) models: advantages and disadvantages?

Korry Hintze, PhD, Utah State University, Nutrition, Dietetics and Food Sciences, Logan, UT, USA. Presentation topic: Formulation of the Western diet

Robert Rucker, PhD, University of California, Davis, Davis, CA, USA. Presentation topic: Allometric scaling, metabolic body size and interspecies comparisons of basal nutritional requirements

David Sela, PhD, Assistant Professor, Department of Food Science, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA, USA. Presentation topic: Bifidobacteria metabolize milk oligosaccharides within the infant microbiome via the fructose-6-phosphate phosphoketolase pathway

Hang Xiao, PhD, Associate Professor, University of Massachusetts Amherst, MA, USA. Presentation topic: Gut microbiota dictate metabolic Fate of Curcumin in the colon

Mesa Aruna, PhD, Professor, Department of Home Science (Food Science & Nutrition), Sri Padmavati Mahila Visvavidyalayam, Andhra Pradesh, India. Presentation topic: Functional quality, sensorial and shelf life characteristics of agathi (Sesbania grandiflora (L).Poir leaves enriched breads

Johannes Westendorf, PhD, Professoer Emeritus, Institute of Experimental Pharmacology and Toxicology University Medical School, Germany. Presentation topic: Morinda citrifolia (Noni), a tropical adaptogenic food and medicinal plant with multiple uses in health and disease

Carolyn Slupsky, PhD, Professor, Chair of the Graduate Group in Nutrition, Department of Nutrition, University of California, Davis, Presentation topic: Unraveling the intricate relationship between food, nutrition, and health

Debasis Bagchi, PhD, Professor, Department of Pharmacological and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Houston College of Pharmacy, Houston, TX, USA

Danik Martirosyan, PhD, President, Functional Food Center/Functional Food Institute, Dallas, TX, USA

Garth L. Nicolson, PhD, Professor, President, Chief Scientific Officer and Research Professor of Molecular Pathology, The Institute for Molecular Medicine, S. Laguna Beach, CA, USA

Jyoti D. Vora, PhD, Head, Department of Biochemistry and Food Science and Quality Control, Ramnarain Ruia College, Matunga, Mumbai. Presentation topic: Novel product development, organoleptic analysis and haccp projection of a dessert made from lotus stem (Nelumbo nucifera)

Isameldin B. Hashim, PhD, Professor,, Chair of Food Science Department, College of Food & Agriculture, UAEU, Al-Ain, UAE. Presentation topic: Quality characteristics of functional bread fortified with date palm fruit residue

Jürgen Schrezenmeir, MD, Professor, Clinical Research Center, KITZ, Kiel, Germany. Presentation topic: Effect of a probiotic Lactobacillus strains on vaginal microbiota and bacterial vaginosis

Mark Willems, PhD, Professor, Department of Sport and Exercise Sciences, University of Chichester, Chichester, United Kingdom. Presentation topic: Beneficial effects on fasting insulin and OGTT responses with intake of New Zealand blackcurrant powder

Sumana Sarkhel, PhD, Assistant Professor, Department of Human Physiology with Community Health, Vidyasagar University, Paschim Medinipur, West Bengal, India. Presentation topic: Evaluation of the anti-inflammatory activities of Quillaja saponaria Mol. Saponin extract in mice

Mahmoud Ghannoum, PhD, Professor and Director of the Center for Medical Mycology at Case Western Reserve University and University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, Cleveland, OH, USA. Presentation topic: Bacteriome and Mycobiome Interactions Underscore Microbial Dysbiosis in Familial Crohn’s Disease: Role of Probiotics and Other Therapeutic Options

Fabienne Le Provost, PhD, “Functional genomics and Physiology of mammary gland” Team Leader, GABI, INRA, AgroParisTech, Université Paris-Saclay, Jouy-en-Josas, France. Presentation topic: Horizontal delivery of microRNAs via food-mother-pup axis

Reza Hakkak, Ph.D, Professor and Chair, Department of Dietetics and Nutrition, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR, USA. Presentation topic: Obesity, Soy Protein Diet and Liver Steatosis

Jingjing Zhu, PhD Student, Division of Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, USA. Presentation topic: Diet and functional impairments among elderly Chinese living in urban Shanghai

Felix Hart, PhD, Avitop GmbH, Berlin, Germany. Presentation topic: Bacteroides xylanisolvens DSM 23964 consumption promotes anti-TFα antibody generation

Hairong Cheng, PhD, associate Professor, School of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China. Presentation topic: Studies on the highly efficient biosynthesis of functional oligosaccharides

Hossein Mirmiranpour, MD, PhD, Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Alborz University of Medical Sciences, Karaj, Iran. Presentation topic: Curcumin can improve hypertension in aged type 2 diabetic patients by modulating oxidative stress

Xiu-Min Chen, PhD, Research Associate, Food, Nutrition, and Health, The University of British Columbia, 2205 East Mall, Vancouver, Canada. Presentation topic: Phytochemical profile and bioactivities of coffee leaf: the impacts of processing methods and the age of leaf

Kiminori Matsubara, PhD, Associate Professor, Department of Human Life Science Education, Graduate School of Education, Hiroshima University, Higashihiroshima, Hiroshima, Japan. Presentation topic: The effects of bioactive compounds derived from sake cake “Sakekasu,” a byproduct of Japanese sake (alcohol) fermentation, on senescence-accelerated mouse and diabetes model mouse

Patrick Provost, PhD, Professor, Faculty of Medicine, Université Laval. CHUQ Research Center / CHUL Axe des maladies infectieuses et immunitaires, Quebec, Canada. Presentation topic: New extracellular vesicles carry most dairy cow milk microRNAs and likely protect them from degradation during digestion

Massimo Bionaz, PhD, Assistant Professor, Animal and Rangeland Sciences, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR. USA. Presentation topic: Effect of poison oak and pasteurization on miRNA of milk exosomes of goats

Kristberg Kristbergsson, PhD, Professor, Faculty of Food Science and Nutrition, School of Health Sciences, University of Iceland. Office at Innovation Center Iceland, Reykjavík, Iceland. Presentation topic: Recent developments in food vehicles for delivery of bioactive compounds in functional foods

Smiti V. Gupta, PhD, Associate Professor, Department of Nutrition and Food Science, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI, USA. Presentation topic: Oil palm phenolics significantly reduced neurotoxic metabolites associated with neurodegeneration in a diet induced aged rat model of Alzheimer’s disease

Geng-Long Hsu, MD, Microsurgical Potency Reconstruction and Research Center, Hsu’s Andrology and National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan. Presentation topic: A novel promising herb formula in sexual health

Beth A. McCormick, PhD, Professor and Vice Chair, Founder, Center for Microbiome Research, Department of Microbiology and Physiological Systems, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, USA. Presentation Topic: The microbiome influences homeostatic control of eukaryotic ABC transporters at the intestinal mucosal surface during health and disease

Kristen L. Beck, PhD, Researcher, Sequencing the Food Supply Chain Almaden Research Center, San Jose, CA, USA. A big tech approach to a "small" problem: microbiome characterization of raw food ingredients to improve food safety


Exhibitors Information:

All vendors have a separate exhibitor table at the conference. The two tables will be located near the conference area and will have sufficient access to conference participants. The international conference will attract many experts from food processing companies, universities, research centers, and related industries from around the world, such as local restaurants and bakeries. This will be a great opportunity to introduce yourself to many international organizations. The cost for vendors is $795.00, which includes one (1) full registration for the conference.

There is a limited amount of space. Please purchase your conference registration ticket and provide your company description, which will appear on the conference website with your sponsorship level, or exhibit booth, listed alongside a hyperlink to your website. Limit the company description to no more than 35 words.

You can fill out the registration form and make a payment for the registration fee to become a vendor for this International Conference. An email confirmation will be sent within two days of the submission date.

If you have any questions, feel free to email us at ffc@functionalfoodcenter.com


FFC's Exhibitors at San Diego Convention Center
FFC's Exhibitors at Harvard Medical School

  • BESO Biological Research Inc., 21660 Copley Dr. Ste# 180, Diamond Bar, CA 91767, USA. Website: http://besoinc.com/home.html. Based in CA, U.S.A. BESO develops nutritional products ranging from daily nutrition to supportive needs. Our products are made with 100% fermented foods that help increase bioavailability and improve nutrient absorption. Our formulation contains a natural (non-synthetic) bio-active compound called 13-Methyltetradecanoic acid.

BESO Logo

  • Danem Dairy Products, Inc., Suleyman Demirel University Technopark, East Campus, 32260 Isparta, Turkey. Web Site: http://www.kefirdanem.com. Danem’s purpose is to protect, maintain and produce genuine kefir grains that contain all of the probiotic bacterial and yeast strains naturally found in traditional kefir. From these grains, we produce our traditional kefir product, Kefirzadem™, with no additives. Using our kefir grains produces kefir with the highest level of natural strains and a magnificent flavor. After a long academic research period, our significant scientific and technical knowledge was transferred to an industrial scale at Danem, Inc. Along with other patent-pending technology, Danem holds three patents on natural kefir and yogurt production from non-GMO, natural probiotic microflora. Danem is the first company in the world that produces significant amounts of non-GMO natural kefir grains, kefir starter culture, natural kefir from kefir grains as well as probiotic yogurt starter culture. Continued research indicates that consumption of our products can contribute significantly to improved health.

Danem Dairy Products Logo

  • Food Science Publisher, 4659 Texas St, San Diego CA, USA. Website: http://functionalfoodscenter.net/food-science-publisher.html. Food Science Publisher is especially interested in human clinical nutrition, functional food science and chronic disease aspects of the publishing field. The company specializes in publishing books in the field of food science, nutrition, functional foods and chronic diseases.

Publisher Logo

  • Vibrant America, 1021 Howard Avenue Suite B, San Carlos, CA 94070-4034, USA. Website: https://www.vibrant-america.com/. Vibrant strives to become the leader in autoimmune diagnostics. Our platform allows us to provide results 4 days sooner than any other regional or specialized laboratory. We are committed to providing the best services and a clinically relevant menu of testing options to accommodate healthcare providers and their patients.

Vibrant America

  • Lifeway Foods, Inc., 6431 West Oakton St. Morton Grove, IL 60053, USA. Website: http://lifewaykefir.com/. Lifeway Foods, America’s leading supplier of the probiotic fermented beverage known as kefir, is on a mission to provide the best probiotic and nutritious foods to consumers. Lifeway has also innovated several new ideas in the dairy industry by introducing breakthrough products. The company is committed to four ideals: all natural hormone and GMO-free ingredients, philanthropy, environmental responsibility, and local farming sustainability.

Lifeway Logo

Osato Research Institute, 1956 Inatomi, Ono-cho, Ibi-gun, Gifu, 501-0501, Japan. Website: http://en.ori-japan.com/. Osato Research Institute works with universities and institutes around the world to support research on FFP® (Fermented Papaya Preparation) and its effect on healthy aging. One of their many goals to is to reduce medical costs associated with aging through preventative therapeutic strategies and education.

FPP Round Logo

ORI Logo


Conference Organizing Committee/Main Conference Organizers

George Perry, PhD, Dean and Professor, College of Sciences, University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX, United States

David A. Sela, PhD, Assistant Professor, Department of Food Science, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA, USA

Jay Whelan, PhD, Professor and Head, Department of Nutrition, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, USA

Robert E. Ward, PhD, Associate Professor. Department of Food Sciences, Utah State University, Logan, UT, USA

Gabriela Riscuta, MD, CNS, Program Director, Nutritional Science Research Group, Division of Cancer Prevention, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda MD, USA

Kamon Chaiyasit, PhD, FACN. Program Director of Complementary Cancer Center of Vitallife at Bumrungrad International Hospital and Program Director of Integrative Functional Nutrition and Wellness Center, Bangkok, Thailand

Garth L. Nicolson, PhD, Professor, President, Chief Scientific Officer and Research Professor of Molecular Pathology, The Institute for Molecular Medicine, S. Laguna Beach, CA, USA

Sreejayan Nair, PhD, Associate Dean, Director, and Professor, School of Pharmacy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY, USA

Debasis Bagchi, PhD, Professor, Department of Pharmacological and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Houston College of Pharmacy, Houston, TX, USA

Danik M. Martirosyan, PhD, President, Functional Food Center/Functional Food Institute, Dallas, TX, USA


Payment Options

The 20th International Conference of the Functional Food Center (FFC) and the 8th Symposium of the Academic Society for Functional Foods and Bioactive Compounds (ASFFBC) will be held on September 22-23, 2016. The FFC accepts new registrations for the conference until the official start date. If you plan on registering for the conference, your presentation will not be scheduled until proper payment has been received. The FFC accepts a multitude of different payments, including check, credit card, PayPal, and bank transfers. All payments must be made to Functional Food Center in US dollars.

When paying with a credit card you must submit the payment through the FFC website. You must use MasterCard, Visa, Discover, or American Express for the payment to be accepted. It can take up to 3-4 business days for the payment to go through and appear on your credit card. A receipt for proof of purchase will be sent to you. It will come with confirmation of your credit card authorization.

When using a bank transfer to make the payment, you are required to send an email after making the payment to ffc@functionalfoodcenter.com. The email must include the following information: date of transfer, amount, invoice number, and name of remitter.

When paying your registration payment with a check, make sure that all checks are made out to Functional Food Center, using US dollars. If you are using a check outside of the United States, please talk to your bank about whether the check will be accepted in the United States’ banks. Any fees that are applicable to international checks will be deducted from the payment, and may result in an incomplete registration. Checks must be mailed to 4659 Texas St, Unit 15, San Diego, CA 92116. An email will be sent confirming that the FFC received payment.

If you have any questions regarding the payment options for the conference, please contact us.

You may click here to make a payment for the conference registration fee.

Conference registration fees are in USD (Early Bird Registration valid until October 30, 2016)

Please note: space at this conference is limited and will be allocated on a first come, first served basis.

Category

Early Bird Registration Fee ($) Until October 30, 2016

Standard Rate (Until February 10, 2017)

Full Time Students

225

325

Dietitians and Retired Professionals*

295

395

USDA, NIH, FDA

395

495

Academic

495

595

Commercial

595

845

Exhibitor/Vendor

995

1295

Abstract Publication Fee

49

49

Late Abstract Publication Fee

99

99

*Must present ID

Please note: space at this conference is limited and will be allocated on a first come, first served basis.

Students enrolled in an undergraduate program (MS, PhD or MD) are eligible for the Student Discount rate. When you register for the conference, you must enter your mentor's name and Email address during checkout to verify your student status.

Reserve Your Space Today


Poster Session

Conference Poster Presentations: Poster presentations give the audience a clear visual of the presenter's work in a simple format. The reasonable size for posters is 2.5-3.0 feet high by 3.5-4 feet wide.

Poster presentation recommendations:

  1. Present the title, the author(s), affiliation(s), and a description of the research, along with highlighting the abstract's major elements.
  2. Minimize detail and try to use simple statements. Keep it short and easy to read.
  3. Remember that pictures, tables, and figures are key to any poster display.
  4. If possible, use color in your visuals.
  5. Don't overwhelm the audience with excessive information. Instead, construct a display that enhances the presentation.
  6. At least 50% of the surface area should be used for photos, graphs and diagrams.
  7. Use a clear structure and layout.
  8. Use complementary colors. Use black or dark blue for text. Too much color can be hard to read!
  9. One or two large, high quality photographs attract attention.
  10. Your title should be a condensed statement of the main idea of your poster. It should be large and clear.
  11. Your poster title should be easily readable from a distance of 3-4 meters. Include author(s) name(s), and address(es).
  12. We recommend the following sections on the poster: Abstract, Introduction, Methods, Tables, Figures, Results, and Conclusions.
  13. Please confirm your poster number on the list. The posters with odd number will be presented on March 25, 2017 and the posters with even number will be presented on March 26. 2017
  14. Please put up your own poster in the position indicated by your presentation number by noon of each day. Presentation numbers are already indicated on display panels. Please check your presentation number and be careful to put up your poster on the correct panel. Please use pins to put up posters. Please do not use glue or sellotape.
  15. Please present your work in front of your own poster during the poster session.
  16. The best poster presentation award will be chosen by votes of all participants.
  17. Posters will be changed every day. Please help by taking your own poster down. Posters still displayed after the removal time has passed will be disposed of by the secretary the following day.

Posters Accepted for Presentation:

P1

Raymond Chong

Analysis of sugarcane as a potential functional food.

P2

Prasanna Gunathilake

In vitro bio-accessibility and antioxidant activity of four edible green leaves

P3

Sonda Ammar

RP-UHPLC-DAD-QTOF-MS screening of bioactive components involved in anti-hyperglycemic and antioxidant activities of Tunisian Ficus carica L. leaves extracts

P4

Boutheina Gargouri

Recovery of high added-value food ingredients from Tunisian citrus limon by-product: Identification and creation of functional food products

P5

Zohreh Hamidi-Esfahani

Arachidonic acid production using Mortierella alpinain batch and fed-batch fermentation

P6

Seun F. Akomolafe

Phenolic extract from Ficus capensis leaves inhibits key enzymes linked to erectile dysfunction and prevent oxidative stress in rats' penile tissue

P7

Mariadhas Valan Arasu

In-vitro probiotic and functional properties of Lactic acid bacteria recovered from date syrup. Arasu MV, Al-Dhabi NA

P8

Yongmei Xia

Glucuronidation and molecular docking of steviol with UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 2B7

P9

Zohreh Hamidi-Esfahani

Optimization of encapsulation conditions of vitamin C within yeast cell Saccharomyces cervisiea as biocapsule

P10

Wonyoung Cheon

Anti-adipogenic activities of (–)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate through modulation of the AMPK pathway in 3T3-L1 cells

P11

Dongyeon Seo

Anti-adipogenic activity of Ligularia stenocephalain extract in 3T3-L1 adipocytes

P12

Yun Fang

Conjugated linoleic acid vesicles worked in physiological pH environment

P13

Naotoshi Sugimoto

Theobromine crosses the blood brain barrier resulting in increased phosphorylation of vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein and cAMP-response element-binding protein in the mouse brain

P14

Ann Donoghue

Evaluating the efficacy of probiotic bacterial isolates in reducing the human food borne pathogen campylobacter in chickens

P15

Anna Corrêa

Tarin, the lectin from colocasia esculenta, reduces cyto and genotoxic effects of cyclophosphamide in mice

P16

Yuri Khotimchenko

Health benefits of the low molecular alginates from marina brown algae

P17

Peter Chi Keung Cheung

Use of probiotics and oat β-glucan as prebiotics to control obesity: A synbiotic approach

P18

Merve Erginer Hasköylü

Development of Halomonas Levan based functional food ingredients

P19

Monireh Rahimkhani

Intestinal infection in malnourished children

P20

Oluwatayo Makinde

Effects of fermentation on the nutritional and anti-nutritional components of cooked/boiled water melon (Citrullus Lanatus) seed

P21

Alperen Hasköylü

The determination of probiotic consumptions of university students by assessing their perceptions through these products

P22

Sachi Shibata

Comparison of the biological activities between carnosic acid and piciferic acid

P23

Nur Ozten Kandas

In vivo physiological genistein concentrations do not inhibit proliferation in prostate cancer cells

P24

Joana Kouprianoff

Time effect on the antioxidant activity of commercial green juice and its manufactured equivalent

P25

Shaban Rahimi

Effect of antibiotics, prebiotics and Lactobacillus plantarum on broiler performance

P26

Helder Louvandini

Milk composition of ewe fed soybean grain and cottonseed

P27

Bethany Grimmig

Astaxanthin attenuates neurotoxicity in a mouse model of Parkinson’s disease

P28

Ali Asqar Saki

Folic acid transfer from feed to egg yolk layers

P29

Amanda Howard

Validation of micronutrients against food frequency questionnaire intakes using simulated diets

P30

Bashir A. Lone

Chenopodium album a locally used vegetable in Kashmir valley and its medicinal properties

P31

Diego Sánchez

Thermal protection of vitamins B1, B2, B3 and B12 by using bacterial nanocellulose to further uses in processed food

P32

Santokh Gill

Furan and its Derivatives in Foods: Characterising the Hazard

P33

Folake L. Oyetayo

Comparative phytochemical composition of the seed and pulp of velvet Tamarid (Dialium guineense) lant

P34

Guðrún Marteinsdóttir

Extraction of bioactives from sugar kelp (Saccharina latissima), winged kelp (Alaria eculenta) and sea lettuce (Ulva lactuca) from the north atlantic with "green" extraction methods: hot water and electroporation

P35

Helder Louvandini

Maternal-filial effect on the performance and testicular morphology of lambs from ewes fed cottonseed (gossypol)

P36

Julio Cesar Lopez-Romero

Biological potential evaluation of Litsea glaucescens Kunth extracts

P37

Maksim Khotimchenko

Low molecular pectin protects against heavy metal exposure

P38

Nabila Farabi

High prevalence of asthma and its determinants among children enrolled in michigan migrant and seasonal head start programs

P39

Shaban Rahimi

Comparison of the effect of antibiotic, probiotic, prebiotic, phytobiotic and Bacillus subtilis on broiler performance

P40

Sudarshan Ojha

Effect of fagopyrum esculentum (Common Buckwheat) flour on anti-oxidant defence and lipid profile in high cholesterol fed rats

P41

Zhuqing Dai

Effects of α-galactooligosaccharides on high fat diet induced metabolic syndrome in mice

P42

Donghun Lee

Astragalus extract mixture for height growth in children with mild short stature: A multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial


Registration Form


Scholarships:

Deadlines:

Scholarship applications for the 21st International Conference of FFC must be submitted by 5:00 pm October 30, 2016. Other important deadlines to consider are:

Abstract Submission Deadline for Scholarship: October 30, 2016 5:00 pm (PST)

Early Bird Registration Deadline: October 30, 2016 5:00 pm (PST)

Award Information:

Functional Food Center is pleased to be offering scholarships to students and postdoc fellows. The purpose of these scholarships is to help students pay for the expenses of attending our conferences. FFC understands it can be expensive for students and academia to afford presenting at conferences, so we hope this financial assistance will support selected applicants present their posters at our conferences.

Scholarship winners will be offered reimbursement of expenses associated with attending our conferences (up to 500 USD). These costs include possible airfare, transportation, hotel stays, and the conference registration. Please note: receipts will be required to receive reimbursement.

Scholarship recipients will be selected by the conference organizing committee who will review each submitted abstract on the quality of the scientific, the objective’s relevance to the conference topic, and presented findings.

Eligible Applicants:

  • Students and postdoctoral fellows who submit abstract(s) for poster or oral presentation(s)
  • Students who are currently enrolled at an academic institution in a Master’s, PhD, and/or MD program will be considered
  • Postdoctoral fellows with a Ph.D. and/or M.D. degree at an academic institution who are conducting research after the completion of their doctoral studies will also be considered

An applicant is eligible to receive one award per conference. If one or more abstracts are submitted from the same lab only one applicant will be awarded.

Criteria for Abstract Review:

For general information on abstract submission requirements, please click on the Abstract Submission tab. The conference organizing committee will review each submitted scholarship application according to the following criteria:

  1. Abstract is relevant to the conference topic(s)
  2. Objective and problem are clearly articulated
  3. Methods, findings, and results are explained and related to research question
  4. Study and findings have potential to inspire discussion on functional food and chronic diseases
  5. Style and language used
  • Abstracts should be written in US English or British English
  • Abstracts should be free of spelling and grammatical errors, including limited abbreviations usage, little to none typography errors, and italics are used appropriately

Application and Submission Requirements:

If you match the eligibility requirements and want to be considered for a scholarship, you should complete all of the following by the scholarship deadline for the conference you wish to present and attend. It is recommended to submit the scholarship application before the deadline to ensure completeness.

  • Submit an abstract for the conference to which you are applying
  • Have your mentor submit a letter via our email ffc@functionalfoodcenter.com to confirm your status as a student or postdoc fellow at an academic institution
  • Complete the Scholarship Form

To apply for a scholarship, visit the conference page that you wish to attend and click the "Scholarship Form" tab or copy & paste http://functionalfoodscenter.net into a new browser.

Late scholarship applications will not be accepted.

Scholarship applicants interested in poster presentation are not required to submit a full article to The Journal of Functional Foods in Health and Disease (FFHD), but it is highly encouraged. For applicants who are interested in giving an oral presentation at the conference, submitting a full article is mandatory. Full articles do not need to be submitted before the scholarship deadline; however, full-text papers should be submitted before the standard abstract deadline. To find out how to submit an article to The Journal of FFHD, please click here: http://www.ffhdj.com.

Notification for Scholarships:

Once the organizing committee has reviewed all of the scholarship applications, we will immediately send an email to notify all scholarship applicants. Award winners will also be listed on the website page to recognize those with the best abstracts. You should receive an email before the Early Bird Registration Deadline so you are able to register at a discounted price.

Requirements of Scholarship Winner:

In order for scholarship recipients to be reimbursed by FFC they must complete these necessary requirements:

  1. Present their poster at the conference
  2. Keep all receipts of travel and registration for the conference
  3. Complete an exit survey after the conference

After you complete these tasks and send us your proof of purchases associated with attending the conference, FFC will send you a check for reimbursement.


Scholarship Form

Apply For Scholarship Form

Please fill out this form completely. As a reminder, you also must submit your abstract and have your mentor submit a letter via our email ffc@functionalfoodcenter.com to confirm your status as a student or postdoc fellow at an academic institution to be considered for an award.


Sponsorship Opportunities

Dear Future Sponsor,

I wish to inform you about an excellent sponsorship opportunity for your company to gain high-quality exposure in the health food industry. Functional foods and bioactive compounds are currently receiving an increased amount of attention from the scientific community, as well as the public. The Functional Food Center’s 21st International Conference will be held at San Diego Convention Center, San Diego, CA, USA. It will be timely in presenting new and relevant information focused on the importance of bioactive compounds and functional foods.

San Diego Since 1998, the Functional Food Center has been a pioneer in the functional food industry. It combines cutting-edge expertise in the biomedical sciences with practical business experience, to aid further research, development, and commercialization of functional food innovations in both domestic and international markets. The Functional Food Center connects a global network of professionals (scientists, functional food experts, and food industry representatives) to a conducive environment for innovative research collaboration. Since 2004, the FFC has organized conferences together with top universities. Scientists, researchers, and food industry professionals present their research and discoveries about healthy, functional, and medical foods with bioactive compounds. In response to the growth of this field, we are proud to introduce the Academic Society for Functional Foods and Bioactive Compounds. 

This society of medical doctors, scientists, dietitians, nutritionists and other food and medical industry professionals will be strictly dedicated to the research and development of functional and medical foods, bioactive compounds, and the discovery of new ingredients.

Partnering with the Functional Food Center by sponsoring our upcoming conference will provide your company with several valuable benefits. These include but are not limited to:

1) Your names and logos endlessly stay on our website, which has about 4800 visitors per month, and have an opening rate of 13% for the newsletter.

2) Your logo will be included in the conference website, promotional materials, and Functional Food Center’s bi-monthly newsletter, which is received by over 700,000 readers including scientists, medical doctors, nutritionists and dieticians.

3) FDA, USDA, and NIH representatives attend our conferences, and you may contact them directly at the time of conference.

4) An option for annual and lifetime sponsorship.

5) Each level of sponsorship will contain a certain number of attendee rights, which allow free-of-charge admission to our conference.

6) You will have the unique opportunity to meet with decision-makers in this field, receive information/support on how to make a new, healthy product, and provide oral presentations about a related topic.

7) The Academic Society for Functional Foods and Bioactive Compounds and Functional Food Center can advise you on how to create a new, healthy and functional product (this can be a separate discussion).

We look forward hearing from you.

Sincerely,

Danik M. Martirosyan, PhD

President of Academic Society for Functional Foods and Bioactive Compounds,

Founder of Functional Food Center, Inc.


Sponsorship Prospectus

Please join us for an exciting opportunity!

We are pleased to invite you to a conference in San Diego Convention Center, San Diego, CA, USA

The Functional Food Center, The Journal of Functional Foods in Health and Disease, Academic Society for Functional Foods and Bioactive Compounds would all be honored for you to join us at our conference. We will bring together experts in medicine, biology and the food industry to discuss the contribution of functional/medical foods and bioactive compounds in the prevention and management of chronic diseases.

With over 175 expected participants, the conference provides a great opportunity to increase the visibility of your company and exhibit products and services to an international group of researchers, clinicians, post-docs and next-generation scientists.

Sponsors and exhibitors will be exposed to a wide audience and will have many promotional opportunities.

Below are details regarding the sponsorship and exhibitor packages. We hope you find the right package for your needs. We look forward to collaborating with you in the future, and hope to see you in Germany.

Since 2004, the Functional Food Center has organized conferences where scientists, researchers, and food industry professionals present their discoveries in the realm of functional foods and bioactive compounds.

The Conference Organizing Committee is pleased to announce the 24th International Conference of FFC - 12th International Symposium of ASFFBC will be held at the Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA on September 20-21, 2018.

The Functional Food Center is a valuable resource for businesses in the food industry. The benefits of sponsorship include but are not limited to:

  • Developing various connections through conference participation, such as medical doctors, food scientists, food industry representatives, dieticians and nutritionists.
  • Information on the latest research and discoveries in the realm of functional foods and bioactive compounds, to develop, market and commercialize healthy products.
  • The ability (if eligible) to gain recognition in the food industry by joining our board of Medical and Food Industry Experts.

Sponsorship funding goes to support conference organization and conference promotion. We are also willing to work with companies who are interested in specifically sponsoring student registration, student travel, international scientist travel, conference lunches, conference receptions, or abstract book publication.

Co-chairman: Danik M. Martirosyan, PhD, President, Functional Food Center/Functional Food Institute; Editor-In-Chief, The Journal of Functional Foods in Health and Disease, Dallas, TX, USA.


Sponsorship Levels and Benefits:

Sponsorship Type / Benefit

Diamond

Platinum

Gold

Silver

Bronze

Sponsorships Available

1

2

3

6

No Limit

Cost

$40,000

$20,000

$10,000

$5,000

$2,500

Attendee Rights

5 Free

4 Free

3 Free

2 Free

1 Free

Lifetime Sponsorship

Yes

Annual Sponsorship

Yes

Yes

*Display Table

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Logo Included in Conference Website

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Logo Included in Promotional Materials

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Acknowledgement in Abstract Book

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Distribution of Company Brochure

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

**Conduct Special Session

Yes

Yes

Yes

***Logo Included in Newsletters

Yes

Yes

Yes

Logo Displayed in Meeting Room

Yes

Yes

****Advertisement in Abstract Book

Yes (1 Page)

Yes (1 Page)

Yes (1/2 Page)

Logo Included on Conference Folder

Yes

Yes

Signage Rights

Yes

*At each conference, an area is reserved for exhibitors. However, because our conferences are held at universities, space is limited. Therefore registration is on a first-come, first-served basis.

**Your company may conduct their own special session regarding a specific topic of your choice at the conference. This is an excellent way to connect with possible collaborates with similar interests.

***Your company’s logo will be included (and linked to your company website) in our bi-monthly Functional Foods in Health and Disease Journal newsletter. It has over 450,000 subscribers including scientists, medical doctors, dietitians and nutritionists. The logo will also be included in our newsletter for the Academic Society of Functional Foods and Bioactive Compounds, which has over 2,000 members.

****In addition to the acknowledgement, Gold sponsors will receive a ½ page of advertising space in the abstract book, and both platinum and diamond sponsors will receive a full page of advertising space. This is a great way to promote your company and its products.


If you have any questions or need additional information, please contact us.

Options

Benefits

Cost

Sponsorship for Scientific Sessions

(4 available)

Sponsor recognition at the beginning of the scientific session

Sponsor name and logo will be included in the conference program, abstract book and websites

Name/logo will be included in every upcoming newsletter to more than 450,000 readers including medical doctors, scientists, etc.

$5,000 each

Social Activities Welcome Reception

(1 available)

Sponsor recognition by room signage

Sponsor name and logo will be included in the conference program and abstract book and websites

$4,500 partial

$9,000 exclusive

Badges and Lanyards

Sponsor name and logo will be included in the conference program and abstract book and websites

$2,000 exclusive

Pens

Sponsor name and logo will be included in the conference program and abstract book and websites

$2,000 exclusive

Bags

Sponsor name and logo will be included in the conference program and abstract book and websites

$2,000 exclusive

Lanyards, Pens, Badges and Bags

Sponsor name and logo will be included in the conference program and abstract book and websites

Name/logo will be included in every upcoming newsletter to more than 450,000 readers including medical doctors, scientists, etc.

$5,000 each

Conference Book Advertisement

The sponsor can place one (1) full-page advertisement (black and white) at the end of the conference program and abstract book

Sponsor name and logo will be included in the conference program and abstract book and websites

$1,000

Exhibitors

Provided with one table close to the conference area with sufficient access to coneference participants

Company description on FFC website

Includes one (1) full registration admission

$1,195

Lunches (2 available)

Name/logo will be included in every upcoming newsletter to more than 450,000 readers including medical doctors, scientists, etc.

One lunch per day; two lunches over two days

Sponsor name and logo will be included in the conference program and abstract book and websites

$2,000 per day

$3,500 exclusive

Daily Tea and Coffee Breaks

(5 available)

Five breaks over three days

Sponsor name and logo will be included in the conference program and abstract book and websites

Name/logo will be included in every upcoming newsletter to more than 450,000 readers including medical doctors, scientists, etc.

$1,000 per day

$4,000 exclusive

Banquet (1 available)

$6,000

Terms of Agreement

  1. Sponsorship will be awarded on a first-come, first-serve basis. Sponsorship will not be reserved until full payment is received.
  2. The sponsor is responsible for all materials, printing, customization and shipping-related costs associated with supplying the logo materials to FFC

Our Partners/Sponsors:

Regenera Logo

Generation 100 Logo

Technology Networks Logo

Functional Food Center Logo

The Academic Society of Functional Foods and Bioactive Compounds


Main Conference Topics/Sessions

Session: Functional Food Definition and the Status of Functional Foods in Japan, USA and other Countries

  • The regulations, policy, and labeling of functional foods in Japan
  • Weaknesses and strong points of FOSHU/Food for Special Health Usage
  • What is the status of Functional Foods in the USA? Expert opinions from NIH, USDA, and FDA
  • How the new definition of Functional Foods can help to improve the status of functional foods word wide

Session: Health Claims: Nutraceutical, Functional and Medical Food Regulations

  • Regulatory issues and barriers
  • Legislation on health claims: healthy, functional and medical foods
  • Regulations, policy, and labeling of regular, functional and medical food products
  • Domestic and international regulations of health claims
  • The activities dealing with the proper labeling of foods
  • Science review of health claims
  • Authorized and Qualified health claims
  • Health Claims: How they will apply to your products and marketing campaigns

Session: Dietitians Position Regarding Functional Foods and Nutraceuticals

  • Nutritionists and dietitians perspective on functional foods
  • Clinical use of functional and medical foods
  • Clinical use and benefits of herbs/botanicals

Session: ASFFBC Scholarship Recipient

Session: Young scientists including full time students and postdoc fellows selected by the organizing committee will present their research

Session: Safety of the Bioactive Compounds and Functional Foods
Food-Drug Interactions

  • Safety of bioactive compounds at efficacious levels
  • Safety of functional foods at efficacious levelsRegulatory issues and health claims

Session: Functional Food Ingredients: Sources and Potential Benefits in Public Health

Session: Functional Foods and Chronic Diseases

  • Epidemiology of Chronic Diseases
  • The modern mechanisms of chronic diseases
  • Biomarkers of chronic diseases
  • The effects of functional food and bioactive compounds on chronic diseases
  • Medical foods for chronic diseases

A: Functional Foods and Obesity

B: Functional Foods and Diabetes

C: Functional Foods and Neurological Diseases

D: Functional Foods and Cardiovascular Diseases

E: Functional Foods and Cancer

F: Prevention and Management of Non-communicable Diseases

Session: Allometric Scaling from Rodents to Humans: Session Chair: Jay Whelan, PhD, Professor and Head, Department of Nutrition, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN, USA, and Robert Ward PhD (Session co-chair) Associate Professor. Department of Food Sciences, Utah State University, Logan, UT, USA

  • Standardizing terminology, units, how the data should be extrapolated in a standard way
  • The principles of dose extrapolation
  • The dose-by-factor approach: Conversion of animal doses to human-equivalent doses by using FDA guidelines
  • Deriving the first-in-human dose
  • Dosing in experimental studies
  • Dosing in children, adults and the elderly

Session: Functional Foods, Bioactive Compounds and Microbiome. Session Chair: David Sela, PhD, Assistant Professor, Department of Food Science, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA, USA

  • Definition of a ‘healthy’ gut microbiome
  • Diet and the intestinal microbiome
  • Breast milk bioactives and their influence on the infant microbiome
  • Impact of polyphenols on a gut model microbiome
  • Probiotics and intestinal immunomodulation
  • Modification of the intestinal microbiota by the application of bioactive compounds and functionall foods

Session: Dietary Exosomes and their Cargos. Session Chair: Janos Zempleni, PhD, Willa Cather Professor of Molecular Nutrition, Director of the Nebraska Center for the Prevention of Obesity Diseases through Dietary Molecules, Director of the Nebraska Gateway to Nutrigenomics, Department of Nutrition and Health Sciences, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE, USA

  • DietaryRNAs and non-coding RNAs
  • Dietary exosomes
  • MicroRNAs from foods
  • MicroRNAs are bioactive compounds
  • Bioavailability of MicroRNAs

Session: Immunomodulation by Functional Foods: Promising Concept for Chronic Disease and Healthy Aging. Session Chair: Gabriela Riscuta, MD, CNS, Program Director, Nutritional Science Research Group, Division of Cancer Prevention, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda MD, USA

  • The immune system: a target for functional food products
  • Modulation of the gut microbiota by diet
  • Relationships between the gut microbiota, chronic disease and aging
  • The effects of gut microbiota to human physiology including nutrient absorption and immune function
  • Probiotics and prebiotics: their influence on health and disease
  • Opportunities to target the ageing through functional food products

Special Session: Functional Foods for Chronic Inflammation: Science and Practice. Session Co-chair:

  • Food ingredients and nutraceuticals for chronic inflammation
  • Functional and medical foods in the management of chronic inflammation
  • Bioactive compounds (vitamins, minerals, etc.) and chronic inflammation
  • Bioactive compounds and foods in prevention of chronic inflammation; Role in tissue regeneration and disease prevention
  • The effects of bioactive compounds on biomarkers of chronic inflammation

Special Session: Application of Modern Technologies for Functional Foods. Session Chair:

  • New technologies in food industry: application for functional foods
  • Nutritional analyses of functional foods
  • Development of new formulations, labels, and recipes
  • Breaking news updates and opinions in food technology
  • NIH dietary supplement label database

Session: Current Marketing Strategies of Functional Foods

  • Risks in marketing healthy food products
  • Limitation of existing nutrition and health claims
  • Opportunities in marketing the healthy and functional foods
  • Market and consumer trends of functional foods and nutritional supplements
  • Pre- and post- market strategy for functional foods
  • Marketing functional foods in Europe, USA, Japan, and other countries

Special Session: Functional Foods in Sports Nutrition

  • How to create new functional foods for athletes
  • Bioactive ingredients for sport nutrition
  • Functional beverages for replenishment of water and electrolytes
  • Functional foods to aid in muscle recovery

Special Session: Current Research and Development of New Functional Food Products. Session chair:

  • Incentives for functional food research and development
  • Consumer acceptance of functional food products
  • Functional food composition and dietary intake databases
  • Food vehicles for delivery bioactive compounds
  • Research, development and marketing of new functional food products

Venue and Accommodation

The conference will take place at the San Diego Convention Center on March 25-26, 2017. Please continue reading to learn more information regarding the venue, hotels, attractions and places to visit during your stay in San Diego!

Convention Center

San Diego Convention Center

Venue

The conference will be held at the San Diego Convention Center (111 W. Harbor Drive, San Diego, CA 92101). The conference center is located downtown across from the San Diego Bay and lies adjacent to the San Diego Padres' PETCO Park and the Gaslamp Quarter, San Diego’s premier shopping, entertainment, and dining neighborhood. Please refer to the map for directions. If you have any general questions about the conference center, location, directions, parking, etc., please email us at ffc@functionalfoodcenter.com.

Click here for a map of downtown San Diego.

Click here for the San Diego Attendee Guide!


-Hotels-

Hotel

Distance from Convention Center

The Marriott Marquis San Diego Marina

0.1 miles

Hard Rock Hotel San Diego

0.1 miles

San Diego Marriott Gaslamp Quarter

0.2 miles

Omni San Diego Hotel

0.2 miles

Hilton San Diego Bayfront Hotel

0.3 miles

Hotel Z-A Piece of Pineapple Hospitality

0.3 miles

The Westin San Diego Gaslamp Quarter

0.5 miles

Embassy Suites by Hilton San Diego Bay Downtown

0.6 miles

For a complete list of hotels and hostels, please click here.

The Marriott Marquis San Diego Marina

This hotel has breathtaking views of the San Diego Bay and is a short drive to many attractions, such as the San Diego Zoo, SeaWorld, Seaport Village, as well as the San Diego Conference Center. It also has a resort-style pool with cabanas, a bar, spa and fitness center. You will be greatly taken care of if you decide to stay here.

Marriott Marquis

For reservations and bookings at the Marriott Marquis San Diego Marina:

https://aws.passkey.com/e/16382534

In order to access special block rates to ensure you book within the block, please call:

Reservations Toll Free: 1-877-622-3056, Reservations Local Phone: 619-234-1500


-Attractions and Places to Visit-

Gas LampDowntown Gaslamp Quarter

Unconditional Surrender
"Unconditional Surrender" Statue, near USS Midway

San Diego Zoo

SeaWorld Theme Park

Seaport Village - 50+ shops, 17 diverse restaurants, and outdoor entertainment

Epicurean San Diego - Food, Farm, & Libation Tours

San Diego Museum of Man

San Diego Museum of Art

Museum of Photographic Arts

San Diego Natural History Museum

USS Midway Museum

Hotel del Coronado - San Diego landmark and icon on Coronado Island

Old Town - Hispanic culture, shops, restaurants and entertainment

Gaslamp Quarter - Downtown shops, restaurants and nightlife

Balboa Park - Museums, gardens, performing arts and recreation

Coronado Hotel
The beautiful, iconic Hotel del Coronado

For a coupon book to save money on dining, attractions, activities and more, click here!


-Transportation-

If you are arriving by plane, the conference center is located 3 miles (just 10 minutes!) from the San Diego International Airport.

San Diego Metropolitan Transit System

The famous San Diego Trolley and bus are great ways to get around the city. The San Diego Trolley has two stops directly in front of the convention center at Harbor Drive/First Avenue and Harbor Drive/Fifth Avenue. For public transportation schedules and more information please click here.

Click here for a trolley map.

San Diego Free Ride

Once downtown, try the new environmentally-friendly electric shuttle service, which is free for everyone. Just wave down one of the San Diego Free Ride electric vehicles or text (619) 821-0520! San Diego Free Ride runs seven days a week, 12- 9pm (PST).

Car Rentals

Cars can be rented near the airport from different companies such as Alamo, Avis, Budget, Dollar, Enterprise, E-Z, and Hertz at the new Rental Car Center. Free shuttle busses will run continually between airport terminals and the Rental Car Center.

For driving directions, please visit the San Diego Convention Center website or click here.

Parking

On-site parking is available at the parking garage located below the convention center. The daily rate is $15 (can range up to $35 for special events). Parking questions? Call ACE Parking at 619-237-0399. Off-site parking is available at various nearby parking lots and garages in downtown San Diego, which many are within walking distance of the convention center. Metered street parking is also available in some areas.


-Explore San Diego-

Our San Diego Harbor Cruise and Tour that we had set up for San Diego Conference participants on March 24th will no longer happen. On the 24th, the last tour of the day is at 3pm, so many participants cannot attend, as they will not be in San Diego yet.

HOWEVER, on March 25th at 18:00, we will leave for a networking dinner on the beautiful Coronado Island. We will take a 15 minute ferry ride from the Convention Center to Coronado Island. You will be able to walk around many shops and restaurants, sightsee, and view the San Diego skyline across the bay. We will then come together for dinner near the harbor.

Afterwards, we will ferry back to the San Diego Convention Center, where you may take a ten minute walk to Seaport Village. This is an iconic village in downtown San Diego that has many local shops and views. As this is downtown, it will be near most participants’ hotels to end the night.

We believe that this event will offer our participants a greater networking opportunity, as we will have more participation. Each participant will pay their $50 fee, and this will include both of the ferry rides and the dinner.

Click on these links to learn more about each place:

Coronado Ferry Landing

Seaport Village

Coronado Island

Email us to let us know you are interested. If you have signed up for the harbor cruise, your payment will be transferred over for this event. If not, please submit your payment here. You may add the ticket to your cart and proceed checkout.

Cruise